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Diseases » Abdominal Pain » Glossary
 

Glossary for Abdominal Pain

  • Abdominal Cancer: Growth of abnormal cells (tumour) affecting the organs in the abdominal cavity; may be due to primary growth of a tumour or spread from another tumour (metastases, secondary tumour)
  • Abdominal Hernia: A protrusion of the intraabdominal contents through a defect in the abdominal wall
  • Abdominal Injuries: Any injury involving the abdomen. Injuries may penetrating or caused by a fall or blow to the abdomen. Symptoms are variable depending on the nature of the injury.
  • Abdominal Neoplasms: A tumor that occurs in the abdomen.
  • Abdominal abscess: An abscess that occurs anywhere in the abdomen.
  • Abdominal aortic aneurysm: A weakness and bulging of a section of an abdominal blood vessel called the abdominal aorta. It is usually associated with severe atherosclerosis in the blood vessel.
  • Abdominal chemodectomas with cutaneous angiolipomas: A rare genetic condition involving the growth of a tumor-like mass of lymphatic tissue in the abdomen.
  • Abdominal conditions: Medical conditions affecting the abdominal region.
  • Abdominal cystic lymphangioma: A rare form of benign tumor that occurs in infants. It is essentially a malformation of one of the abdominal lymph vessels where a portion is dilated and form a lymph fluid-filled cyst. Symptoms may vary depending on the exact location and size of the cyst.
  • Abruptio Placentae: Placental bleeding usually late in a pregnancy.
  • Acanthocytosis: A rare disorder where most of the red blood cells are abnormal with spiny projections due to lipid abnormalities. The blood abnormality is seen in conditions such as abetalipoproteinemia, severe liver disease and severe malnutrition. Symptoms and prognosis depend on the underlying disorder.
  • Accutane -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that the use of Accutane during pregnancy may cause a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Acetaminophen poisoning: Excessive ingestion of a drug called acetaminophen.
  • Acorn poisoning: Acorns contain tannic acid which affects the metabolism of proteins and causing serious symptoms if large amounts are consumed. The amount of tannin in the acorn varies amongst species - higher tannin content results in a more bitter tasting acorn.
  • Acquired angioedema: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative or autoimmune disorders which result in the dysfunction of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Actinomycotic appendicitis: Chronic suppurative appendicitis resulting from infection by Actinomyces israelii. . It is extremely rare, but it is important to diagnose it, since failure to treat it adequately may result in protracted illness with extensive local spread.
  • Acute Angle Closure Glaucoma: Primary angle closure is defined as an occludable drainage angle and features indicating that trabecular obstruction by the peripheral iris has occurred (ie, peripheral anterior synechiae, increased IOP, lens opacities, excessive trabecular pigmentation deposits).
  • Acute Appendicitis: Infection of the appendix
  • Acute Cholecystitis: Acute inflammation of the gall bladder, usually due to obstruction by a gall stone
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute cholinergic dysautonomia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal red blood cells in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute erythroleukemia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal blood cells (erythroblastic precursors) in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute fatty liver of pregnancy: A rare complication of pregnancy that can occur in the second half of the pregnancy. It is characterized by excessive fatty deposits in the liver which can be fatal without prompt diagnosis and treatment which involves delivering the baby as soon as possible.
  • Acute intermittent porphyria: A rare metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency in the porphobilinogen deaminase enzyme which results in a build-up of porphyrins or its precursors in the body. Using certain drugs or eating certain foods can trigger the symptoms of the condition.
  • Acute leukaemia of ambiguous lineage: A term used to describe a type of leukemia (a blood cancer) where the leukemic cells cannot be determined as myeloid or lymphoid or where both types of cells are present.
  • Acute megacaryoblastic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. More specifically, it involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 1: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of immature blood cells (blast cells).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 2: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 3: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 3 involves the proliferation of promyelocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 4: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 4 involves the rapid proliferation of myelocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 5: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 5 involves the rapid proliferation of monoblasts (immature precursors of monocytes) in particular.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 6: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 6 involves the proliferation of the immature precursors of red blood cells called erythroblasts.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 7: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 7 involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes) in particular.
  • Acute myelocytic leukemia: A cancer of the blood-forming tissues of the bone marrow involving the proliferation of cells that normally develop into infection-fighting cells such as eosinophils, monocytes, basophils and neutrophils. The cancerous cells replace the normal bone marrow cells. Acute leukemia involves a more rapid proliferation of cancer cells compared to chronic forms of leukemia.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to alkylating agent: The use of alkylating agents to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to topoisomerase type II inhibitor: The use of topoisomerase type II inhibitors to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, therapy related: Certain cancer therapies can result in the development of leukemia in some patients. These therapies includes topoisomerase type II inhibitors and alkylating agents.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia, adult: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute non lymphoblastic leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets. It is one of the most common forms of leukemia in adults but can occur in children.
  • Acute prostatitis: An acute condition which affects the prostate which is the result of infammation
  • Acute rheumatic fever: Bacterial joint infection with risk of heart complications.
  • Acute urinary retention: The acute retention of urine in the bladder, not being able to void
  • Addison's Disease: A rare progressive hormonal disorder characterized by insufficient production of certain hormones called adrenal corticosteroids.
  • Addisonian crisis: Severe adrenal gland complication from Addison's disease.
  • Adenocarcinoid tumor: A rare type of tumor that occurs in the gastrointestinal tract and tends to metastasize. The symptoms are determined by the location of the tumors.
  • Adenoma, Islet Cell: A pancreatic tumor which may be benign or malignant. Symptoms may vary depending on the location and size of the tumor as well as whether the tumor secretes hormones or not. For example, the tumor may block the biliary duct.
  • Adenosine triphosphatase deficiency, anaemia due to: Deficiency of a chemical (adenosine triphosphate) resulting in anemia.
  • Adnexal and Skin Appendage Neoplasms: A type of tumour that develops on particular organs - eyes, skin and uterus. The tumors are usually benign but some may become malignant. The symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor and whether it is benign or malignant. These type of tumors tend to be most common in middle-aged women.
  • Adrenal crisis: A condition which is characterized by insufficient amounts of the adrenocortical hormones that results in vomiting, nausea, hypotension and electrolyte abnormalities
  • Adrenal disorders: Disorders affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal hyperplasia, congenital type 3: A group of disorders that occur when a deficiency of 21-hydroxylase impairs the normal process of making adrenal corticosteroids. The severity of the condition is variable depending on the degree of deficiency.
  • Adrenal insufficiency: Where there is insufficient secretion of hormones secreted from the adrenal glands
  • Adult Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is an inherited condition characterized by the production of thick sticky mucus by the mucus glands in the lungs, intestines, liver and pancreas. The condition is most often diagnosed in children or young adults but occasionally, relatively mild symptoms may lead to frequent misdiagnosis or no diagnosis at all unless the symptoms become worse. The condition may be misdiagnosed as emphysema, asthma or chronic bronchitis. It is usually females with a mild form of the disease who tend to be diagnosed at a later age.
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- 1,2-Dibromo-3-Chloropropane: 1,2-Dibromo-3-Chloropropane is a chemical used in soil fumigants and as a nematocide for various field crops. Commercial examples include Fumagon, Nemagon, Fumazone, Nemapax, Nemafume. Some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the route of exposure.
  • Aflatoxicosis: Poisoning from ingestion of aflatoxins.
  • Al Murrah-induced lead poisoning: Al Murrah is a folk remedy used mainly by Saudi Arabian people to treat problems such as stomach pain, diarrhea and colic. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Alarcon-induced lead poisoning: Alarcon is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albayaidle-induced lead poisoning: Albayaidle is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albayalde-induced lead poisoning: Albayalde is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Alcoholic liver disease: Alcoholic liver disease is the major cause of liver disease in Western countries, (in Asian countries, viral hepatitis is the major cause). It arises from the excessive ingestion of alcohol.
  • Alendronate -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on rats and rabbits indicate that the use of Alendronate during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • Allergenic cross-reactivity: Studies have indicated that a significant number of people with certain allergies will also have allergic responses to other allergens which have a similar protein. For example patients allergic to birch pollen will often have allergies to plant foods such as apples and peaches. Symptoms can range from mild response to severe allergic reactions. Cross-reactivity tends to have mainly oral allergy symptoms with breathing problems and anaphylactic reactions being extremely rare. Food allergies related to cross-reactivity tend to be less severe than those not related to cross-reactivity.
  • Allergic Disorders: A group of disorders that a caused by an allergic response to allergens
  • Allergies: Immune system over-reaction to various substances.
  • Alveolar echinococcosis: A rare parasitic infection caused by the larva of a miniscule tapeworm called Echinococcus multilocularis. Transmission occurs through contact with foxes, coyotes, dogs and cats. The condition results in the development of parasitic tumors in the liver (sometimes other organs such as brain and lungs) but it generally causes no symptom for 5 to 15 years after infection.
  • Amanita polypyramis poisoning: Amanita polypyramis is a type of large-capped mushroom often found growing in the wild in the US. The mushroom tends to give off a chlorine-like odor. It is poisonous and death can result if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Amaryllis poisoning: The Amaryllis plant is a bulbous, flowering herb which originated from South America. The bulb contains alkaloids such as lycorine which are toxic but a large quantity would need to be eaten to cause poisoning.
  • Amebiasis: An intestinal infection caused by a parasitic amebic organism. It is usually associated with poor sanitation.
  • American mountain fever: A viral disease transmitted through the bite of ticks (Rocky Mountain wood tick and American dog tick) who are infected with the virus. Because the virus infects blood cells including erythrocytes, transmission can also occur through transfusion with infected blood but this is uncommon. Infection is most common in Canada and parts of western US. The incubation period usually lasts between 3 and 6 days but can be as long as a few weeks. The virus tends to cause to periods of fever each lasting for a few days.
  • Amyloidosis AL: A disease involving the abnormal deposit of amyloid fibrils in virtually any part of the body - the heart, liver, kidney and peripheral and autonomic nerves are most commonly affected. The abnormal amyloid fibrils are produced abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow. In some cases, the excess growth of abnormal plasma cells can result in a cancerous condition called myeloma resulting in bone pain and infections. A patient with myeloma may develop amyloidosis but it is rare for a patient with AL amyloidosis to go on to develop myeloma.
  • Anal Cancer: Cancer (malignant) that develops in the tissues of the anus.
  • Anal conditions: Conditions that affect the anus
  • Anchovy poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some anchovies contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the anchovy does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The anchovies are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Anemic -- hematuria syndrome: An epidemic disease in Argentina which has a prolonged recovery time but usually there are no complications. Symptoms vary between seasons so that affected patients suffer anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea and dehydration in summer but suffer reduced urination, excess blood, albumin and renal casts in the urine. Other symptoms occur irrespective of the season.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anesthetic agents. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Chloroform: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called chloroform. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Cyclopropane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called cyclopropane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Ether: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called ether. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Halothane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called halothane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Methoxyflurane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called methoxyflurane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Nitrous Oxide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called nitrous oxide. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Angiofollicular ganglionic hyperplasia: A rare disorder characterized by a localized overgrowth of lymph node tissue which can form a benign tumor-like growth. The symptoms are determined by the location and number of growths. There are two types of the disease: hyaline-vascular type or the plasma cell type which tends to have more severe symptoms.
  • Angiofollicular ganglionic hyperplasia -- hyaline-vascular type: A rare disorder characterized by a localized overgrowth of lymph node tissue which can form a benign tumor-like growth. There are two types of the disease: hyaline-vascular type or the plasma cell type which tends to have more severe symptoms. The hyaline-vascular type is usually asymptomatic but symptoms can be determined by the location and number of growths and the effect it can have on nearby tissue by pushing against it - e.g. squashing blood vessels.
  • Angiomyolipoma: A rare, benign growth that usually occurs in the kidney. It is usually asymptomatic unless it becomes large or starts bleeding. It is usually associated with tuberous sclerosis.
  • Angioneurotic Edema: Recurring periods of noninflammatory swelling involving the skin, intestinal organs, brain and mucous membranes. In severe cases, respiratory swelling can result in compromised breathing.
  • Angiostrongyliasis: Infection by a parasitic worm (Angiostrongylus). Infection can occur through eating contaminated raw animals such as snails, slugs, prawns or crabs which act as hosts to these parasites.
  • Anguillulosis: A infectious disease caused by an intestinal parasite called Strongyloides stercoralis (round worm). Infestation can occur directly through broken skin or through ingestion. Symptoms can take decades to develop in some cases. In rare cases, reinfection occurs and the parasites travel to other parts of the body such as the liver and lungs which can cause serious symptoms. The condition is highly deadly in immunocompromised patients.
  • Anisakiasis: Intestinal infection by a parasitic worm (Anisakidae). Infection usually occurs by eating seafood infected with the larvae.
  • Anorectal disorders: Conditions that affect the anorectum
  • Anthrax: A serious infectious bacterial disease that can be fatal.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by taking certain antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Cephalosporin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Cephalosporin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Chloramphenicol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antibiotic called Chloramphenicol. Chloramphenicol a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Clindamycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Clindamycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Erythromycin Ethyl succinate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Erythromycin Ethyl succinate antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Erythromycin estolate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure Erythromycin estolate antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Nitrofuran: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Nitrofuran antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Novobiocin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Novobiocin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Penicillin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Penicillin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Quinolone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Quinolone antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Rifampicin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Rifampicin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Spectinomycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Spectinomycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Sulfones: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to sulfone antiboitics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Telithromycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Telithromycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Tetracycline: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tetracycline antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anticonvulsives. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Mephenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called mephenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Phenobarbital: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called phenobarbital. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Phenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called Phenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Valproic Acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called valproic acid. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antifungal agents. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- 5-Fluorocytosine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called 5-Fluorocytosine. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Amphotericin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Amphotericin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Griseofulvin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Griseofulvin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Ketoconazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Ketoconazole. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Saramycetin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Saramycetin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Antimetazoal agents. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage -- Amodiaquine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antimetazoal agent called amodiaquine. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage -- Hycanthone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called hycanthone. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiprotozoal agents. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- 8-Hydroxyquinolone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called 8-Hydroxyquinolone. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Carbarsone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called carbarsone. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Emetine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called emetine. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Mepacrine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called mepacrine. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Metronidazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called Metronidazole. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Thiabendazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called Thiabendazole. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antituberculous agents. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Cycloserine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called cycloserine. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Ethionamide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called ethionamide. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Isoniazid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called isoniazid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Rifampicin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called rifampicin. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- p-aminosalicylic acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called p-aminosalicylic acid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiviral agents. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- Cytarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called cytarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- Vidarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called vidarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- idoxuridine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called idoxuridine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- xenylamine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called xenylamine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Aorta conditions: Conditions that affect the aorta
  • Aortic aneurysm: A localised dilatation of the aorta which results in a 50% increase in its diameter
  • Aortic aneurysm, familial abdominal 1: A rare familial disorder where the abdominal aorta has a weak, bulging portion. The condition is asymptomatic but can result in death if it bursts. Type 1 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 19q13.
  • Aortic aneurysm, familial abdominal 2: A rare familial disorder where the abdominal aorta has a weak, bulging portion. The condition is asymptomatic but can result in death if it bursts. Type 2 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 4q31.
  • Aortic aneurysm, familial abdominal 3: A rare familial disorder where the abdominal aorta has a weak, bulging portion. The condition is asymptomatic but can result in death if it bursts. Type 3 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 9p21.
  • Apolipoprotein C 2I deficiency: A rare inherited condition where a deficiency of apolipoprotein C-II impairs lipoprotein metabolism and results in a build up of chylomicrons and VLDL.
  • Appendiceal tumor: A tumor of the appendix. The condition is often misdiagnosed as acute appendicitis. The cancer usually metastasizes from other sites and rarely starts in the appendix.
  • Appendix cancer: Cancer of the appendix. The cancer usually metastasizes from other sites and rarely starts in the appendix.
  • Appendix disorders: Disorders that affect the appendix
  • Apricot seed poisoning: Apricot seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the pit remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Most parts of the apricot plant contain the toxic chemical with the highest concentration in young leaves. Different species of apricots have different levels of toxic chemical. Severe symptoms or even death can occur if children consume more than ten kernels or adults consume more than forty kernels. Theories exist that apricot kernels may help cancer sufferers but there has been no scientific studies that have proven this.
  • Aralia poisoning: Aralia is an evergreen shrub which produces clusters of small white flowers. The plant originated in Asia and Africa. The plant contains a toxic chemical called saponic glycoside and can cause skin irritation if skin contact occurs or other symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low toxicity.
  • Arcobacter butzleri infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Arcobacter genus. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms but may also cause blood infections. The bacteria tends to originate in pigs, cattle, sheep and water.
  • Arcobacter cryaerophilus infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Arcobacter genus. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms but may also cause blood infections. The bacteria tends to originate in pigs, cattle, sheep and water.
  • Arcobacter infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Arcobacter genus. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms but may also cause blood infections. The bacteria tends to originate in pigs, cattle, sheep and water.
  • Arctic bearded seal poisoning: The Arctic Bearded seal is often used as a food source by the arctic inhabitants. Eating the liver and kidneys of the arctic bearded seal can result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases. It is believed that eating more than 100-250 grams of the seal liver can result in human death.
  • Arenavirus: A genus of viruses of the family Arenaviridae
  • Arenaviruses: Rare viral infection usually caught from rodents.
  • Ascariasis: Large intestinal roundworm from 6 to 13 inches.
  • Ascaris lumbricoides: Common roundworm infecting human intestines. Causing restlessness, fever, diarrhea.
  • Aseptic abscesses syndrome: A rare syndrome involving the development of deep, sterile lesions containing neutrophils. The lesions don't respond to antibiotics but do respond to corticosteroid therapy. The abscesses usually occur in the abdomen and are often associated with conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease and polychondritis. Although the abscesses respond to corticosteroids, more than half of the cases relapse.
  • Asherman Syndrome: Amenorrhoea due to intrauterine adhesions often secondary to curette.
  • Asherman's syndrome: Scarring and adhesions that develop in the uterus and can result in menstrual and fertility problems.
  • Asiatic porpoise poisoning: The Asiatic porpoise is eaten mainly in China. Eating the liver, internal organs and muscle tissue of the Asiatic porpoise can cause poisoning symptoms in humans if sufficient quantities are consumed. The nature of the toxin is unknown but it is believed that some cases result from very high levels of vitamin A in the liver.
  • Astrovirus: An RNA virus that may affect the gastrointestinal system
  • Astroviruses:
  • Australian Sea Lion poisoning: The Australian Sea Lion is sometimes used as a food source and is found in the South-Southwest waters of Australia. Eating the liver of the Australian Sea Lion can result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases.
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease associated Celiac Disease: Patients with autoimmune thyroid disease are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Autumn crocus poisoning: The Autumn crocus is a perennial herb which bears purplish-pink flowers. The plant is often used as an ornamental indoor or outdoor plant. The plant contains a chemical called colchicine which can be very poisonous if eaten. The plant is considered to be very toxic if eaten. Boiling the leaves before eating them appears to increase their toxicity. Most cases of poisoning are through accidental ingestion. The plant is sometimes mistaken for wild garlic.
  • Azarcon-induced lead poisoning: Azarcon is a lead-containing tetraoxide salt used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Azithromycin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Azithromycin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Ba Bow Sen-induced lead poisoning: Ba Bow Sen is a folk remedy used mainly by Chinese people to treat childhood hyperactivity and to alleviate nightmares. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Baber's syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by the association of congenital liver cirrhosis with Fanconi syndrome.
  • Babesiosis: A parastic infection by a particular protozoa (Babesia) which is transmitted through tick bites. The disease produces symptoms similar to malaria.
  • Back tumour: The presence of tumour growth in the vertebra, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast.
  • Bacterial appendicitis: Appendicitis is inflammation of the inner lining of the vermiform appendix that spreads to its other parts. Appendicitis may occur for several reasons, such as an infection of the appendix, but the most important step is the obstruction of the appendiceal lumen.
  • Bacterial digestive infections: Bacterial infections affecting the gastrointestinal
  • Bacterial septicemia: Sepsis of the bloodstream caused by bacteraemia.
  • Balantidiasis: Intestinal infection with a parasitic protozoa (Balantidium coli) resulting in intestinal inflammation. It is usually transmitted through direct or indirect contact with pig fecal matter.
  • Bali goli-induced lead poisoning: Bali goli (flat black bean) is a folk remedy used mainly by Indian and Asian people to treat intestinal problems. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Balsam apple poisoning: The Balsam apple is a climbing vine which produces yellowish fruit. The fruit contains toxins - resin, saponic glycoside and alkaloids - which can cause various symptoms if eaten. Large amounts of the fruit or seeds to be consumed to cause toxicity. The leaves of the plant may be cooked, drained and eaten safely.
  • Balsam pear poisoning: The Balsam pear is a climbing vine which produces yellowish fruit. The fruit contains toxins - resin, saponic glycoside and alkaloids - which can cause various symptoms if eaten. Large amounts of the fruit or seeds to be consumed to cause toxicity. The leaves of the plant may be cooked, drained and eaten safely.
  • Banti Syndrome: A rare conditions where chronic congestive spleen enlargement causes it to destroy red blood cells too early. The spleen becomes enlarged due to an obstruction of blood flow in the organ and the resulting increase in blood pressure.
  • Banti's syndrome: A rare condition where chronic congestive spleen enlargement causes it to destroy red blood cells too early. The spleen becomes enlarged due to an obstruction of blood flow in the organ and the resulting increase in blood pressure.
  • Bartonella infections: Infection with bacteria from the Bartonella genus of bacteria. Specific bacteria from within this group are Bartonella bacilliforms (Oroya fever), Bartonella Heneslae (Cat-scratch disease). Other conditions caused by this bacteria are endocarditis, bacteremia and angiomatosis. Symptoms vary depending on the type of bacteria involved and the severity of the infection - immunocompromised patients face greater risk of severe infection.
  • Beeswax poisoning: Beeswax can cause a gastrointestinal blockage if excessive quantities are eaten.
  • Benign peptic ulcer: Benign ulcer is erosion in the lining of the stomach.
  • Bernard syndrome: A familial condition characterized by acute anemia, jaundice, hemoglobinuria and destruction of red blood cells. Acute symptoms may follow an episode of fever, abdominal pain, vomiting, malaise and joint pain.
  • Biaxin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Biaxin (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Bicarbonate deficit: A condition caused by excessive organic or inorganic acids in the body. The excess may be due to abnormally high acid production such as occurs during fever and starvation or may occur as a result of excessive acid intake, acid retention or loss of bases.
  • Bile Duct Cancer: A malignancy arising in the bile ducts of the liver
  • Bile Duct Conditions: An inflammatory bacterial infection that affects the meninges
  • Bile duct cancer, extrahepatic: A rare cancer that develops in the part of the common bile duct that is outside the liver. The common bile duct channels bile from the gall bladder (which stores bile) and the liver (which makes bile) to the small intestine to assist digestion.
  • Bile duct cysts: The formation of a cyst (dilation or swelling) in the bile duct which can obstruct the flow of bile and result in jaundice.
  • Biliary Atresia: A rare condition that can affect newborns where the bile duct that carries the bile from the liver to the small intestine is blocked or missing.
  • Biliary colic: Colicky pain as a result of gallstones blocking the gallbladder.
  • Biliary disorder: Any condition affecting the bile ducts
  • Biliary tract cancer: Cancer that develops in the gallbladder or bile ducts.
  • Bint Al Zahab-induced lead poisoning: Bint Al Zahab is a folk remedy used by various ethnic groups (e.g. Indians, Saudi Arabians) to treat infant colic and to facilitate the passage of meconium in newborns. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Bird cherry seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Bitter almond seed poisoning: Bitter almond seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Bitter almond plants grow mainly in Northern America. Various processes can be used to leach the toxic chemical out of the bitter almonds.
  • Black henbane poisoning: Black henbane is a herb which has hairy stems and bears flowers and fruit. All parts of the plant contain tropane alkaloids which is toxic enough to cause death if eaten. Black henbane is often used for medicinal purposes to treat a variety of health conditions.
  • Black jetbead poisoning: The Black jetbead is a deciduous shrub which bears single white flowers and small groups of shiny black fruit. The fruit contains amygdalin which is very toxic and can cause severe poisoning or even death if eaten.
  • Black locust poisoning: The black locust is a large deciduous tree which has long clusters of scented flowers and flat fruit pods. The young leaves, seeds and inner bark contain various chemicals (robin, robinine and robitin) which can be toxic if large quantities are eaten. The flowers are considered edible if handled correctly.
  • Black nightshade poisoning: The Black Nightshade is a herb which bears small white or purple flowers and dull black berries. The plant originated in South America. The berries contain solanine alkaloid which can be toxic if eaten in large quantities. The leaves and unripe berries are considered toxic whereas the ripe fruit is possibly edible.
  • Black widow spider envenomation: The black widow spider bite is toxic to the nerves and can cause serious symptoms. The black widow spider is most commonly found in North America.
  • Bladder Cancer: Bladder cancer refers to any of several types of malignant growths of the urinary bladder. It is a disease in which abnormal cells multiply without control in the bladder.
  • Blastocystis hominis: Common parasitic condition often causing digestive symptoms.
  • Blood cancer: Malignancy of one or several of the different types of cells in the blood
  • Bog rosemary poisoning: Bog rosemary is a type of heath found in bogs and cold peat areas of the more northern parts of the world. It is a small shrub with tall thin stems. The flowers are whit or pink. The plant contains a chemical called grayanotoxin which can cause various symptoms if eaten. The plant is only considered poisonous if large amounts are eaten.
  • Bokhoor-induced lead poisoning: Bokhoor is a traditional used mainly by Saudi Arabian people to calm infants - it involves burning wood and lead sulphide and inhaling the fumes that are produced. This practice has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to the relatively high exposure to lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Bonefish poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some bonefish contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the bonefish does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The bonefish are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Bornholm disease: Contagious viral infection
  • Bothriocephalosis: Infection with an intestinal parasite. The parasite is a fish tapeworm called Diphyllobothrium latum. Human infection is caused by eating undercooked contaminated fish.
  • Botulism food poisoning: Extremely dangerous food poisoning requiring medical attention, but not always recognized because of its non-abdominal symptoms.
  • Bowel conditions: Medical conditions that affect the bowels
  • Bowel strangulation: Twisting of the bowel often around fibrous bands, causing decreased blood supply and death of bowel tissue.
  • Box thorn poisoning: The leaves of the Box thorn plant contain a toxic chemical called atropine and possibly other toxic compounds. The box thorn plant is a spiny-stemmed shrub which originated in Europe. Symptoms can be quite serious depending on the quantity of the plant ingested.
  • Brennemann syndrome: A condition that can occur in young children after a respiratory tract infection. It primarily involves inflammation and swelling of the lymph glands in the abdomen, fever, vomiting and nausea.
  • Breynia officinalis poisoning: Ingestion of the Breynia officinalis plant can cause irritation to mucosal linings and liver problems. The plant is often used as a herbal drug (Chi R Yun) to treat such things as poor growth, heart failure and venereal disease.
  • Bright's Disease: A condition where the parts of the kidneys that are responsible for filtering become inflamed and results in blood and proteins accidentally leaking into the urine. The condition can occur after certain infections and serious kidney dysfunction can result in severe or chronic complications.
  • Brinton disease: Thickening and hardening of the stomach wall usually associated with diffuse stomach cancer or damage due to the consumption of caustic soda.
  • Briquet syndrome: A rare, chronic mental disorder characterized mainly by often claiming to have constant physical illness when none is able to be detected. It most often occurs in young females.
  • Broad bean poisoning: The broad bean is a vine which produces pea-like flowers and long, seed-filled pods. The seeds can be very toxic and can result in death if eaten. This toxic reaction only occurs to certain susceptible people who are unable to process certain chemicals in the plant. The resulting condition is called favism and is most common in people of Mediterranean descent.
  • Budd-Chiari syndrome: Budd-Chiari syndrome is the clinical picture caused by occlusion of the hepatic veins. It presents with the classical triad of abdominal pain, ascites and hepatomegaly.
  • Bulimia nervosa: Eating disorder with binging (overeating) and purging (vomiting).
  • Bumetanide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Bumetanide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Burkholderia pseudomallei: Gram negative, aerobic, motile rod shaped bacterium.
  • Burnett's milk drinker's syndrome: Burnett's milk drinker's syndrome is a condition where the body is too alkaline and the blood contains too much calcium which results in impaired kidney function. It can be caused by drinking large quantities of milk or using too many alkaline antacid remedies. High vitamin D intake can make the condition worse. The people most at risk of this condition tend to be older people (especially women) who are taking calcium supplements as well as calcium carbonate containing remedies to treat dyspepsia.
  • Burnett's syndrome: Burnett's syndrome is a condition where the body is too alkaline and the blood contains too much calcium which results in impaired kidney function. It can be caused by drinking large quantities of milk or using too many alkaline antacid remedies. High vitamin D intake can make the condition worse. The people most at risk of this condition tend to be older people (especially women) who are taking calcium supplements as well as calcium carbonate containing remedies to treat dyspepsia.
  • Burning bush poisoning: The burning bush is a shrub that has bright red leaves in autumn and bears red berries. The plant contains toxic chemicals such as lobelamine and lobeline which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities.
  • Bushmaster poisoning: The Bushmaster is a poisonous snake found in America.
  • C1esterase deficiency: C1esterase deficiency is a condition characterized by swelling under the skin or mucosal tissue - the skin, respiratory tract or gastrointestinal tract may be affected. The condition may be inherited or acquired. Symptoms tend to develop over a few days and then abate after two to five days. Swelling attacks may occur fairly regularly e.g. weekly or sporadically e.g. once or twice a year.
  • Calla lily poisoning: A bulb plant which bears large colored or white flower-like structure on long leafless stems. It is often grown in gardens or used in flower arrangements. The plant contains chemicals including calcium oxalate crystals which are highly toxic if eaten. Death can result if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Callistin shellfish poisoning: The Callistin shellfish (Japanese Callista) is found primarily in Japan. Eating the whole shellfish can cause poisoning symptoms in humans. It is believed that the ovaries contain high levels of choline during spawning season which makes them toxic to humans. The symptoms that manifest are similar to a severe allergic reaction. Avoiding eating the ovaries is the best way to prevent poisoning - cooking does not destroy the toxin.
  • Campylobacter fetus infection: Campylobacter fetus is a food borne bacterial infection which may vary in severity from mild to severe. The bacteria are opportunistic and mainly affect debilitated patients but can also occur in healthy patients. Abortion due to blood infection in the fetus can occur in pregnant women who become infected. The infection is less likely to cause gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea than other Campylobacter infections but is prone to causing infection in other parts of the body such as the appendix, abdominal cavity, central nervous system (meningitis), gallbladder, urinary tract and blood stream. Cattle and sheep are the main source of this bacteria.
  • Campylobacter food poisoning: Common bacterial infection usually from chicken.
  • Campylobacter hylointestinalis infection: Campylobacter hyloinstesinalis is a food borne bacterial infection which may cause mild to severe gastroenteritis. Cattle, pigs, hamsters and deer are the main source of this bacteria.
  • Campylobacter jejuni: Rod shaped bacteria causing diarrhea.
  • Campylobacter jejuni infection: Campylobacter jejuni infection is a common food borne bacterial infection which may vary in severity from mild to severe. Death can occur in severe cases but tends to occur in patients with other existing illnesses such as HIV, cancer or liver disease. The infection can in rare cause infection in other parts of the body such as the appendix, abdominal cavity, central nervous system (meningitis), gallbladder, urinary tract and blood stream. Undercooked chicken is the main source of infection.
  • Campylobacter jejuni subspecies doylei infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Campylobacter family. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Campylobacter laridis infection: Campylobacter laridis is a food borne bacterial infection which may cause mild to severe gastroenteritis in healthy individuals and blood infection in immunocompromised patients.
  • Candelabra cactus poisoning: The Candelabra cactus is a spiny cactus with a milky sap. The sap contains a chemical called diterpene ester which is mildly toxic if eaten and can cause minor skin irritation upon skin contact.
  • Candle poisoning: Candles can cause a gastrointestinal blockage if excessive quantities are eaten.
  • Caper spruge poisoning: The caper spruge is a herb which has a milky sap and bears flowers and fruit. The plant originated in Europe and tends to grow in mountainous areas. The plant sap contains diterpene esters which is mildly toxic if eaten and can cause minor skin irritation if skin contact occurs.
  • Capillaria philippiensis infection: A fish borne parasite that can infect humans. Transmission most often occurs through ingestion of contaminated fish. Severity of symptoms tend to increase as the number of worms multiply in the intestines. Death can occur if the condition is left untreated.
  • Capillary leak syndrome with monoclonal gammopathy: A rare condition characterized by leaky blood vessels and an increased level of certain blood proteins (monoclonal gammopathy). Monoclonal gammopathy itself does not cause any symptoms unless it develops into plasma cell leukemia. The condition may vary from mild to severe enough to cause death.
  • Captopril -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Captopril during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Carbenicillin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Carbenicillin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Carcinoid crisis: Carcinoid crisis can occur spontaneously or as a response to stress, such as anesthesia or chemotherapy.
  • Carcinoid of Gastrointestinal Tract: Carcinoid tumor in the digestive tract.
  • Carcinoid syndrome: Carcinoid heart disease is a rare, metastatic disease that occurs predominantly in the right heart. The tricuspid and pulmonic valves are affected, leading to right heart failure, which results in increased morbidity and mortality.
  • Carnation poisoning: The carnation is a perennial flowering herb with narrow grayish leaves. The plant originated in Eurasia and is often grown in gardens and used in flower arrangements. The leaves contain triterpenoid saponins which can cause symptoms if sufficient quantities are eaten. Skin irritation can also occur upon skin exposure. The plant is considered to have a low level of toxicity and large quantities would need to be eaten to cause any symptoms.
  • Caroli Disease: A rare disorder where the bile ducts inside the liver become enlarged resulting in infection, irritation and gallstone formation.
  • Carukia barnesi sting: The Irukandji jellyfish is a very small type of box jellyfish found mainly in the northern tropical waters of Australia. Their sting is not particularly painful by the ensuing symptoms can be severe and life-threatening.
  • Cat scratch disease: An infectious disease transmitted through a cat's bite, scratch or lick and resulting primarily in lymph node pain and swelling. The condition can be mild or severe.
  • Cebagin-induced lead poisoning: Cebagin is a folk remedy used mainly by Middle Eastern people to treat teething. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Cefaclor -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cefaclor (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cefadroxil -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cefadroxil (a broad spectrum antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Celiac Disease: Digestive intolerance to gluten in the diet.
  • Celiac artery stenosis from compression by median arcuate ligament of diaphragm: A rare birth defect where a ligament (median arcuate) is located too low and compresses an artery (celiac artery). When the artery is compressed, blood flow is affected and abdominal pain and other symptoms may occur. The disorder is most common in thin females. Many people may have the anomaly but only in some cases is the compression severe enough to cause symptoms.
  • Cephalexin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cephalexin (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Chagas disease: A parasitic infection caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by insect bites or blood transfusions. The disease primarily involves the heart and gastrointestinal system.
  • Chemical poisoning: Morbid condition caused by chemical.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 1,4-Dioxane: 1,4-Dioxane is a chemical used mainly as a reagent in laboratries and as a solvent in chemical processing. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 1-Amino-2-propanol: 1-Amino-2-propanol is a chemical used mainly in the synthesis of various pharmaceuticals such as methadone and opioid. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2,4-Dichlorophenol: 2,4-Dichlorophenol is a chemical used in the production of antiseptics, bactericides, disinfectants and fungicides. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2-Amino-2-methylpropanol: 2-Amino-2-methylpropanol is a chemical used mainly in industrial applications. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2-Butoxyethanol: 2-Butoxyethanol is a chemical used mainly in dry cleaning, textile dyeing, protective coatings, glass cleaners, solvents, cleaning agents and paint thinners. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2-Hexanone: 2-Hexanone is a chemical used mainly in paints, solvents and coated fabrics. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2-Methyl-4-Chlorophenoxyacetic Acid: 2-Methyl-4-Chlorophenoxyacetic Acid is a chemical mainly used as a herbicide for field crops and turf. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 4,4-Methylenebis: 4,4-Methylenebis is a chemical used in the manufacture of epoxy resins, belt drives, gun mounts, shoe laces and various other manufactured goods. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetonitrile: Acetonitrile is a chemical used as a solvent mainly in nail removing agents. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetylene Tetrabromide: Acetylene Tetrabromide is a chemical used mainly in mineral separation and as a solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetylsalicylic Acid: Acetylsalicylic Acid is also known as aspirin and is primarily used to relieve pain, fever and inflammation. Excessive exposure to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylamide: Acrylamide is a chemical used mainly in the treatment of waste water, grout agent, paper strengthening agent and adhesive agents. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylic acid: Acrylic acid is a chemical used mainly in the production of resins and acrylic acids which are usually used in adhesives and coatings. It is also used in water treatment and in the production of plastics and detergents. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylonitrile: Acrylonitrile is a chemical used mainly in the production of acrylic and modacrylic fibers but also in the production of certain plastics, nylon dyes, drugs and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Adiponitrile: Adiponitrile is a chemical used mainly in the production of hexamethylene diamine which in turn is used mainly to produce nylon. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aftershave: Aftershave contains chemicals (ethyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol) which can cause symptoms if ingested in sufficient quantities. Death from ingesting aftershave is considered unlikely. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Alanycarb: Alanycarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and nematicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aldicarb: Aldicarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aldoxycarb: Aldoxycarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Alkaline dry cell batteries: Alkaline dry cell batteries contain toxic chemicals and eating the batteries can cause various symptoms if the chemical is released from the battery. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Allyl alcohol: Allyl alcohol is a chemical used mainly as a weed killers and as a material in the production of other chemical compounds. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Allyl chloride: Allyl chloride is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of epichlorohydrin and glycerin but is also used in the production of products such as polyester, varnish plastic adhesive, insecticides, perfumes and pharmaceuticals. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Allyxycarb: Allyxycarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aluminum Phosphide: Aluminum Phosphide is a chemical used mainly as a rodenticide and fumigant for grains. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aminocarb: Aminocarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonium Bifluoride: Ammonium Bifluoride is a chemical used wheel cleaners, herbicides and in the manufacture of magnesium. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonium Nitrate: Ammonium Nitrate is a chemical used mainly in explosives, fireworks and fertilizers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Anti-rust products: Anti-rust products contain various chemicals which are toxic if ingested. The ingested chemicals can continue to cause damage to the organs and gastrointestinal lining for weeks after the ingestion and severe cases can result in death. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Antimony: Antimony is a chemical often used as an alloy with other metals such as lead. It is used in solder, ammunition, pewter, sheet metal, pipe metal and cable sheaths. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Antu: Antu is used as a rodenticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Asphalt: Asphalt is the substance used in road surfacing and is also used in electrical adhesive and paints. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Automatic dishwashing detergent: Automatic dishwashing detergents contain chemicals which can cause severe symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the dishwashing detergent cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Barium: Barium is an element used in fireworks, glassmaking, contrast X-rays and in the electronics industry . The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bendiocarb: Bendiocarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly in . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benfuracarb: Benfuracarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Borates: Borate is a chemical used in a wide variety of products - herbicides, paints, insecticides, rodenticides and various personal products such as skin creams, toothpastes and powders. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromates: Bromate is a chemical used mainly in perming solution neutralizers and in small amounts as a bread preservative. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromide: Bromide is a chemical used for many applications - flame retardant, industrial uses, pesticides, sanitary products, fumigants, medicines, dyes, photographic solutions and water purification. Bromides act as central nervous system depressants and the ingestion of excessive quantities can cause serious symptoms. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromophos: Bromophos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bubble Bath soap: The ingestion of bubble bath soap can cause gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bufencarb: Bufencarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Butacarb: Butacarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Butocarboxim: Butocarboxim is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Butoxcarboxim: Butoxcarboxim is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Button batteries: Button batteries are small round, button-shaped batteries used in various products such as watches and calculators. Generally, swallowing the batteries will cause no problems unless it becomes stuck in the gastrointestinal tract. The batteries may also be shoved up the nose by children which can cause respiratory problems depending on how far the battery is pushed and how long it remains undetected. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Butylamines: Butylamines are chemicals used in a variety of manufacturing processes such as in the production of pesticides, pharmaceuticals, plastics, dyes, textiles and in leather tanning and photography. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cadmium: Cadmium is a chemical used mainly in batteries, solder, amalgams, cigarettes, PVC pigments and phosphate fertilizer production. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Calcium Oxide: Calcium oxide is a chemical used mainly in sewage treatment, dry cement and in the manufacture of products such as aluminum, glass and steel. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Calcium hypochlorite: Calcium hypochlorite is a chemical used mainly in bleaching products, fungicides, algicides, disinfectants and deodorants. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Camphor: Camphor is a chemical used mainly in moth repellents, pharmaceuticals (preservative) cosmetics, explosives, varnishes and various therapeutic applications. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Captan: Captan is a chemical used as a fungicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical is considered to carry a low risk of poisoning through ingestion.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbanolate: Carbanolate is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbaryl: Carbaryl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbofuran: Carbofuran is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbon Disulfide: Carbon Disulfide is a chemical used mainly in corrosion inhibitors, cold and nickel plating, photography applications and as a solvent in gums and resins. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbosulfan: Carbosulfan is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and nematicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Caulking products: Caulking products (e.g. silicon, acrylic, neoprene) are used to seal gaps and the chemicals in them can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlordane: Chlordane is a poison use to control termites - is banned in the US and many other countries due to its harmful effects. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorfenvinphos: Chlorfenvinphos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorobenzene: Chlorobenzene is a chemical used mainly as a solvent and in the production of various other chemicals. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorodiphenyl: Chlorodiphenyl is a chemical used mainly in electrical cables and wires, electric condensers, lubricants and foundry coating and in the manufacture of paper, resins, rubbers, textiles, wood preservatives, electrical components, lacquers, herbicides and plasticizers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chloropicrin: Chloropicrin is a chemical used mainly in fumigants for grain storage. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorpyrifos: Chlorpyrifos is a chemical used mainly in as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Clinitest tablet: Clinitest tablet are used to test sugar levels in urine. The tablets contain various chemicals (copper sulfate, sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate) and eating them can cause serious symptoms. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cloethocarb: Cloethocarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and nematicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cloth Dyes: Cloth dyes contain chemicals which are considered not toxic but the ingestion of large amounts cay cause symptoms. Some dyes contain corrosive ingredients which can cause severe gastrointestinal damage and even death in severe cases. Most household cloth dyes don't contain corrosive chemicals. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cologne: Colognes contain chemicals such as ethanol and isopropanol which can cause symptoms if ingested or inhaled in excessive quantities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Coumaphos: Coumaphos is used as a pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cresols: Cresols are a group of chemicals that occur naturally in mammals and various plants. It is also manufactured and used in the production of disinfectants, deodorizers and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cresylic acid: Cresylic acids are a group of chemicals that are used as solvents and in the manufacture of various products such as deodorants, disinfectants, pesticides, glues, paints, herbicides, pharmaceuticals as well as others. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cuticle remover: Cuticle removers contain chemicals such as sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide which can cause serious symptoms if swallowed or inhaled in excessive quantities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cyclohexanol: Cyclohexanol is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent and used in the manufacture of products such as plastic, nylon, soap, varnish, paint, lacquer, degreasers, detergent and insecticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cyclohexanone: Cyclohexanone is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent, in processes involving oxidative reactions and in the manufacture of certain resins, nylons, insecticides, herbicides, paints, varnish, polishes, degreasers and pharmaceuticals. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cypermethrin: Cypermethrin is a widely used insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Decarbofuran: Decarbofuran is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Demeton-S-methyl: Demeton-S-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Deoderant: Deoderants contain various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Depilatories: Depilatories are used to remove hair from parts of the body. They contain various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are ingested. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diazinon: Diazinon is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dichlorvos: Dichlorvos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dicresyl: Dicresyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dicrotophos: Dicrotophos is a toxic insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diesel oil: Diesel oil is a commonly used fuel. Ingestion is unlikely due to the foul taste and smell. Accidental or purposeful ingestion can result in internal burns and various other symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diethyl Phthalate: Diethyl Phthalate is a chemical used mainly in cosmetic and as a plasticizer in the production of various plastic products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diethylene Glycol: Diethylene Glycol is a chemical used mainly in coolants, manufacture of plastic products and resins as well as other uses. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimetan: Dimetan is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimethyl Phthalate: Dimethyl Phthalate is a chemical used mainly as an insect repellant . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimethylnitrosamine: Dimethylnitrosamine is a chemical used mainly as a solving in the manufacture of plastics, rubbers, lubricants and rocket fuel. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimetilan: Dimetilan is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dinitrocresol: Dinitrocresol is a chemical used mainly as a herbicide and fungicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dioxacarb: Dioxacarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dioxathion: Dioxathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diquat Dibromide: Diquat Dibromide is a chemical used mainly in herbicides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Disulfiram: Disulfiram is a drug used mainly to manage alcoholism. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Disulfoton: Disulfoton is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Drain Cleaners: Drain cleaners contain chemicals which can cause severe symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the drain cleaners cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Drainpipe Cleaners: Drainpipe Cleaners contain chemicals which can cause severe symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the drainpipe cleaners cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dye remover: Dye removers can contain chemicals which are corrosive and can cause severe gastrointestinal damage and even death in severe cases. The damage may continue for a few weeks after ingestion so death can occur weeks after the incident. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- EMPC: EMPC is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Emulsion paints: Emulsion paints (latex or water-based) contain various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Epichlorohydrin: Epichlorohydrin is a chemical used for a variety of applications - epoxy production, insecticides, solvent and agricultural chemical. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethiofencarb: Ethiofencarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethion: Ethion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethyl Methacrylate: Ethyl Methacrylate is a chemical used mainly in . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylene Dichloride: Ethylene Dichloride is a chemical used mainly in fat solvents and as a fumigant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylene Glycol: Ethylene Glycol is a chemical used mainly in antifreeze, coolants and as a solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. Symptoms tend to occur in three phases: the first 12 hours involves inebriation, seizuresand brain swelling; the second and third day involves deterioration of lung and heart function and the third stage involves kidney damage and possibly failure. Death can occur during any of the stages.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylene Glycol Dinitrate: Ethylene Glycol Dinitrate is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of commercial dynamite and blasting gelatin. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylenediamine: Ethylenediamine is a chemical used mainly as a solvent in the manufacturing process for the production of things such as fungicides, waxes, gasoline additives and pharmaceuticals. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Face Powder: Face powder contains various chemicals that can cause symptoms if ingested although this is rare. Eye and inhalation exposure can also cause symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenethacarb: Fenethacarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenobucarb: Fenobucarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fensulfothion: Fensulfothion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenthion: Fenthion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and avicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fluoridated toothpaste: Fluoridated toothpaste contains fluoride and various other chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. As little as half a tube of children's paste can cause death in a 2 year old child and a whole tube can cause death in a 9 year old child. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Furathiocarb: Furathiocarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Furfural: Furfural is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent and in the manufacture of fuels, foods and ant poisons. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Furniture polish: Furniture polish contains chemicals (hydrocarbons) which can cause serious symptoms if ingested. The ingested chemicals can continue to cause damage to the organs and gastrointestinal lining for weeks after the ingestion and severe cases can result in death. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glaze: Glazes are used to put a shiny finish on various surfaces such as pottery. Glazes contain chemicals such as lead and zinc oxide which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are eaten. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glutaraldehyde: Glutaraldehyde is a chemical used mainly in sterilizing agents, herbicides, pesticides and disinfectants. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hair Bleach: Hair bleach contain chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the hair bleach can continue to cause gastrointestinal damage for weeks after ingestion. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hair Dye: Hair dyes contain chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the hair dye can continue to cause damage for weeks after ingestion. Some dyes contain lead or mercury which can cause neurological problems even if low level exposure occurs over an extended period of time. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hexachlorobutadiene: Hexachlorobutadiene is a chemical used mainly in fumigants and as a solvent in the manufacture of products such as lubricants and rubber. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hexachlorocyclopentadiene: Hexachlorocyclopentadiene is a chemical used mainly in the production of chlorinated pesticides, flame retardants, dyes and certain resins. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hexane: Hexane is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of products such as glue, paint, shoes and furniture. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hydrogen Fluoride: Hydrogen Fluoride is a chemical used mainly in car cleaning products and in the production of integrated circuits. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hyquincarb: Hyquincarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Imazapyr: Imazapyr is a chemical used mainly in herbicides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Incense: Drinking liquid incense or inhaling incense fumes can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Isoprocarb: Isoprocarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Isopropyl Alcohol: Isopropyl Alcohol is a chemical used mainly as a rubbing alcohol and also in perfumes, paint thinners, disinfectants, cleaners and fuels. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Jewelry cleaner: Jewelry cleaner contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested or other types of exposure occurs. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lacquer: Lacquer contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested or other types of exposure occurs. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lead-containing Paint: Lead pain contains lead as well as other harmful chemicals. The lead in the pain is toxic (especially to young children) and ingesting fresh or old paint can cause serious symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lighter fluid: Lighter fluid contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested or other types of exposure occurs. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Malathion: Malathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Manganese: Manganese is a chemical used mainly in fertilizers, welding rods, matches, electrical coils, ceramics and animal food additives. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metal cleaner: Metal cleaner contains various chemicals which can cause severe symptoms if ingested or other forms of exposure occur. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metal polish: Metal polish contains various chemicals which can cause severe symptoms if ingested or other forms of exposure occur. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metaldehyde: Metaldehyde is a chemical used mainly as a molluscicide, in heating fuel and in fire lighters. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methacrylate: Methacrylate is a chemical used mainly in plastics, adhesives and bone cements. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methidathion: Methidathion is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methiocarb: Methiocarb is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methomyl: Methomyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methyl Bromide: Methyl Bromide is a chemical used mainly in insecticides, fire extinguishers, wool degreasers and oil extraction. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methyl Isocyanate: Methyl Isocyanate is a chemical used mainly in herbicides and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether: Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether is a chemical used mainly in automotive gasoline but is also used as a solvent and chemical reagent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methylene Chloride: Methylene Chloride is a chemical used mainly in paint removers, nail polish remover, fumigants and fire extinguishers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methylene Diisocyanate: Methylene Diisocyanate is a chemical used mainly in the production of hard plastics and polyurethane foams. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metolcarb: Metolcarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mexacarbate: Mexacarbate is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mineral oil: Mineral oil can cause gastrointestinal symptoms if ingested.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Morpholine: Morpholine is a chemical used in a variety of applications: rubber industry, corrosion inhibitor, pharmaceuticals, dyes, crop pesticides and as a solvent in various manufacturing processes. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mould remover: Mould removers contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if swallowed, inhaled or skin and eye exposure occurs. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mouth Wash: Mouth wash contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Naphthalene: Naphthalene is a chemical used mainly as a moth repellant, toilet deodorizer and the manufacture of other chemicals. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitric Acid: Nitric Acid is a chemical used mainly as a cleaning agent for food and dairy equipment, in explosives, metal etching, in liquid fuel rockets and as a laboratory reagent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrilacarb: Nitrilacarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrites: Nitrite is a chemical used in many applications: manufacture of dyes, fabric manufacture, corrosive inhibitors, photography and cyanide antidote kits. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitroethane: Nitroethane is a chemical used mainly as in industrial solvent, fuel additive, propellant, manufacture of pharmaceutical products and in artificial nail removers . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrofen: Nitrofen is a used as a herbicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitroglycerin: Nitroglycerin is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of explosives, dynamite, rocket propellant and smokeless powders. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrophenol: Nitrophenol is a chemical used mainly in the production of dyes and pigments and also in fungicides and laboratory chemicals. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrophenol Urea: Nitrophenol Urea is a pesticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Oil-based paint: Oil-based paint contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed or if other types of exposure occurs. These paint contain toxic hydrocarbons as well as various other heavy metals depending on the type of paint. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Oven Cleaners: Oven cleaners contain toxic chemicals which can cause serious symptoms on exposure. Severe gastrointestinal burns can be caused by ingesting oven cleaner. The burns can lead to perforation which involves a high risk of death. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Oxamyl: Oxamyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, acaricie and nematicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Paraphenylenediamine: Paraphenylenediamine is a chemical used mainly in photographic developing solutions, hair dye, photocopying and printing ink, black rubber, grease, temporary tattoos and car cosmetics. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Parathion: Parathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pentachlorophenol: Pentachlorophenol is a chemical used mainly in fungicides, herbicides, insecticides, molluscicides, algicides and bactericides. It is commonly used as a wood preservative. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phenol: Phenol is a chemical used mainly in the production of fertilizer, explosives, rubber, paint, paint remover, perfumes, asbestos products, wood preservatives, resins, textiles, pharmaceuticals and drugs. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phosdrin: Phosdrin is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phosphine: Phosphine is a chemical used mainly in pesticides and rodenticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phthalthrin: Phthalthrin is an insecticide - it is used mainly for indoor purposes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Generally, large amounts need to be involved to cause serious symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pine Oil: Pine Oil is a chemical used mainly as a disinfectant or cleaning agent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pirimicarb: Pirimicarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Polychlorinated Dibenzofurans: Polychlorinated Dibenzofurans are a group of chemicals that are usually formed as a byproduct of various industrial processes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pool Cleaners: Pool Cleaners contain various chemicals (mainly chlorine) which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The chemicals are very damaging to the mucosal linings in the body. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Potassium Permanganate: Potassium Permanganate is a chemical used in various applications: topical antibacterial, photography, laboratory chemical, wood dye, water purification and bleaching processes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Profenofos: Profenofos is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Promacyl: Promacyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Promecarb: Promecarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Propoxur: Propoxur is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pyridine: Pyridine is a chemical used mainly in the production of herbicides, pesticides, antihistamine steroids, sulfa antibiotics, water repellents, dyes, paints and rubber. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Rotenone: Rotenone is a naturally occurring chemical found in certain plants (Derris and Lonchocarpus sp.). It gives the plant insecticidal and pesticidal properties and is hence utilized commercially as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Inhalation tends to cause more severe symptoms than ingestion. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Selenium Dioxide: Selenium Dioxide is a chemical used mainly in gun bluing solutions. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Silver: Silver is a chemical used mainly in electric products and photography. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Sodium Azide: Sodium Azide is a chemical used mainly in nematocides, herbicides, explosives detonators and in vehicle air bags. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Sodium Hypochlorite: Sodium Hypochlorite is a chemical used mainly in disinfectants, bleach, deodorizers and as a water purifier. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Solder: Solder contains various chemicals and heavy metals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Stoddard Solvent: Stoddard Solvent is a solvent used in dry cleaning, ink printing, adhesives, paint thinners, liquid photocopier toners. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Sulfur Trioxide: Sulfur Trioxide is a chemical used mainly in the production of sulfuric acid and explosives. Sulfur trioxide is also a significant air pollutant which can mix with moisture in the air to produce "acid rain". Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tar remover: Tar remover contains various chemicals (mainly hydrocarbons) which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tazimcarb: Tazimcarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Terbufos: Terbufos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetrachloroethane: Tetrachloroethane is a chemical used mainly as a dry cleaning solvent but is also used as a degreaser and in paint strippers and spot removers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetrachloroethylene: Tetrachloroethylene is a chemical used mainly as a fabric dry cleaner, degreaser, worming treatment for animals and in the manufacture of freons. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetraethyl Pyrophosphate: Tetraethyl Pyrophosphate is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetramethrin: Tetramethrin is an insecticide - it is used mainly for indoor purposes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Generally, large amounts need to be involved to cause serious symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetryl: Tetryl is a chemical used mainly as a military explosive. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thallium: Thallium is an element used for such things as electronic devices, selenium rectifiers, gamma radiation detection apparatus, transmission equipment and infrared radiation detection. It is also used as a catalyst in various manufacturing processes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thiocarboxime: Thiocarboxime is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thiodicarb: Thiodicarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thiofanox: Thiofanox is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tin: Tin is an element used mainly in steel can coatings, copper wire coating and solder, bronze and pewter. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Titanium: Titanium is an element used mainly in alloys. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Toluene Diisocyanate: Toluene Diisocyanate is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of elastomers and polyurethane foams. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Trichlorfon: Trichlorfon is an insecticide used mostly in crops. It is considered motderately toxic to humans. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Trichloroethane: Trichloroethane is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent but also in inks and lubricants. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Trimethacarb: Trimethacarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, bird repellent, molluscicide and mamal repellent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Turpentine Oil: Turpentine Oil is a chemical used mainly as a solvent, paint thinner and various other applications such as deodorizing fragrances and antiseptics. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Vanadium: Vanadium is an element used mainly in steel alloys but is also used in glass coatings, electric fuel cells and other applications. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- White Phosphorus: White Phosphorus is a chemical used mainly in fertilizers, water treatment, rodenticides and insecticides (for cockroaches). Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Window cleaner: Window cleaner contains various chemicals (usually alcohols and ammonia) which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- XMC: XMC is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Xylene: Xylene is a chemical used mainly in pesticides and in the manufacture of glue, paint, paper, rubber, pharmaceuticals and polymers. It is also used as a solvent and clarifier for microscopic tissue examinations in laboratories. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Xylylcarb: Xylylcarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Zinc Phosphide: Zinc Phosphide is a chemical used mainly as a rodenticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- acetic acid: Acetic acid is a chemical used for medicinal purposes such as superficial ear infections, jellyfish stings and bladder irrigation. Acetic acid is a also a component of vinegar which is used as a cooking ingredient. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chenile plant poisoning: The chenille plant is a shrub which bears a long thin stem of red flowers. The plant originated in Australia and New Guinea and is often utilized as a houseplant or ornamental garden plant. The sap from the plant contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if eaten or if skin contact occurs. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity if eaten.
  • Cherry laurel seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Wild cherry plants grow mainly in eastern Europe, Western Asia and Britain.
  • Cherry seed poisoning: Cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually only occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Chest pain: Pain in the chest area.
  • Chiari-Frommel syndrome: A rare condition where galactorrhea and amenorrhea continues for an abnormal length of time (generally longer than 6 months) after giving birth.
  • Chilaiditi syndrome: A rare disorder where a part of the colon, or sometimes intestine, is abnormally positioned between the liver and the diaphragm. The defect may occur in people who have chronic lung disease or abdominal ascites but may also occur in healthy individuals without causing symptoms.
  • Childhood liver cancer, primary: Cancer that develops in the tissue of the liver in children.
  • Chlorzoxazone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Chlorzoxazone (a muscle relaxant and pain reliever) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Chokecherry seed poisoning: Chokecherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Chokecherry plants grow mainly in Northern America.
  • Cholangitis: bile duct inflammation (cholangitis)
  • Cholecystitis: Inflammation of the gallbladder which concentrates and stores bile. The condition may occur suddenly (acute) or persist over a longer period of time (chronic).
  • Cholelithiasis: Is the presence of gallstones in the gallbladder
  • Cholestyramine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cholestyramine (cholesterol-lowering drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cholybar -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cholybar (cholesterol-lowering drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Christmas Cherry poisoning: The Christmas Cherry is a small reddish-orange fruit. The plant contains a compound called solanocapsine which can cause symptoms if excessive amounts are consumed. The compound is found in all parts of the plant - especially the leaves and unripe fruit. Very large amounts would need to be consumed to cause symptoms due to the low toxicity of the compound.
  • Christmas Rose poisoning: The Christmas Rose plant contains proteoanemonin which can cause blisters and saponins which can cause irritation. The plant is found mainly in Europe. All parts of the plant are poisonous.
  • Chronic Infectious Diarrhoea: It may be defined as diarrhea caused by an infection of the digestive system by a bacterium, virus, or parasite that results in frequent bowel motions producing excessive amounts of liquidy feces.
  • Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia: A rare form of leukemia characterized by excessive levels of mature neutrophils.
  • Chronic Pancreatitis: Chronic ongoing inflammation of the pancreas causing digestive complaints.
  • Chronic erosive gastritis: A rare disorder where inflamed lesions form on the stomach lining. The ulcers may occur over a long period of time or quickly.
  • Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of certain blood cells - myelocytes and monocytes. The proliferation is slower than in acute forms of the disease.

 

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