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Diseases » Absence seizure » Glossary
 

Glossary for Absence seizure

  • Automatisms: Mechanical, seemingly aimless behavior characteristic of various mental disorders
  • Brain conditions: Medical conditions that affect the brain
  • Dravet syndrome: A rare, severe form of generalized infant epilepsy that starts after a fever. Initial infant development is normal but once the seizures start, psychomotor development slows and mental decline occurs. The seizures usually occur every month or two to start with.
  • Epilepsy: Brain condition causing seizures or spasms.
  • Epilepsy juvenile absence: A rare form of epilepsy that occurs around the time of puberty. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures occur when waking up and myoclonic seizures can also occur.
  • Epilepsy with myoclonic absences: A epileptic disorder which involves uncontrollable, rhythmic jerks of the limb.
  • Epilepsy with myoclonic-astatic crisis: A form of childhood epilepsy which is associated with a sudden loss of muscle tone which often results in the sufferer falling over and possibly injuring themselves.
  • Epilepsy, generalized -- paroxysmal dyskinesia: An epileptic disorder characterized by generalized epilepsy and sudden episodes of involuntary abnormal movements. The abnormal movements may be triggered by fatigue, stress or alcohol. Patients may suffer only the seizures or only the dyskinesia or both.
  • Eye blinking symptoms: Problems with the ability to blink or excessive blinking
  • Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus: An inherited seizure disorder characterized by febrile seizures during early childhood and persisting seizures after early childhood which may or may not involve fever. The range and severity of symptoms is variable and may include febrile seizures, partial seizures and generalized seizures. The seizure disorder persists after the age of six which differentiates it from the similarly names seizure disorder called generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures. There are five (perhaps more) subtypes of the condition, each originating from a different genetic defect.
  • Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus, type 1: Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus is an inherited seizure disorder characterized by febrile seizures during early childhood and persisting seizures after early childhood which may or may not involve fever. The range and severity of symptoms is variable and may include febrile seizures, partial seizures and generalized seizures. The seizure disorder persists after the age of six which differentiates it from the similarly names seizure disorder called generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures. There are five (perhaps more) subtypes of the condition, each originating from a different genetic defect. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome 19q13.
  • Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus, type 2: Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus is an inherited seizure disorder characterized by febrile seizures during early childhood and persisting seizures after early childhood which may or may not involve fever. The range and severity of symptoms is variable and may include febrile seizures, partial seizures and generalized seizures. The seizure disorder persists after the age of six which differentiates it from the similarly names seizure disorder called generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures. There are five (perhaps more) subtypes of the condition, each originating from a different genetic defect. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2q24.
  • Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus, type 3: Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus is an inherited seizure disorder characterized by febrile seizures during early childhood and persisting seizures after early childhood which may or may not involve fever. The range and severity of symptoms is variable and may include febrile seizures, partial seizures and generalized seizures. The seizure disorder persists after the age of six which differentiates it from the similarly names seizure disorder called generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures. There are five (perhaps more) subtypes of the condition, each originating from a different genetic defect. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 15q31.1-q33.1.
  • Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus, type 5: Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus is an inherited seizure disorder characterized by febrile seizures during early childhood and persisting seizures after early childhood which may or may not involve fever. The range and severity of symptoms is variable and may include febrile seizures, partial seizures and generalized seizures. The seizure disorder persists after the age of six which differentiates it from the similarly names seizure disorder called generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures. There are five (perhaps more) subtypes of the condition, each originating from a different genetic defect. Type 5 is caused by a defect on the GABRD gene.
  • Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus, type 6: Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus is an inherited seizure disorder characterized by febrile seizures during early childhood and persisting seizures after early childhood which may or may not involve fever. The range and severity of symptoms is variable and may include febrile seizures, partial seizures and generalized seizures. The seizure disorder persists after the age of six which differentiates it from the similarly names seizure disorder called generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures. There are five (perhaps more) subtypes of the condition, each originating from a different genetic defect. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 8p23-p21.
  • Nervous system conditions: Diseases affecting the nerves and the nervous system.
  • Petit mal epilepsy: A condition which is characterized by absence seizures

 

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