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Deaths from Accidental injury

Accidental injury: Deaths

Deaths from Accidental injury: 101,537 deaths in USA 2001 (CDC); 97,860 deaths (NVSR Sep 2001)

Deaths from types of Accidental injury: for details see deaths from types of Accidental injury analysis; summary of available deaths by type data:

  • Accidental death: 97,860 annual deaths in 1999 (NVSR Sep 2001)
  • Drowning: 3,529 deaths reported in USA 1999 (NVSR Sep 2001); 1.8 per 100,000 in Canada 19971
  • Falls: 15,019 deaths in USA 2001 (CDC); 13,162 deaths reported in USA 1999 (NVSR Sep 2001); 5.0 per 100,000 in Canada 19971
  • Machinery accidents: 0.2 per 100,000 people died from machinery injury in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • Suffocation: 10,376 annual cases in USA 1995 (IOM); 6.1 per 100,000 in Canada 19971
  • Occupational Injuries: about 5,840 deaths annually based on 16 per day (CDC-OC)

Death Rate Extrapolation

Death rate extrapolations for USA for Accidental injury: 101,536 per year, 8,461 per month, 1,952 per week, 278 per day, 11 per hour, 0 per minute, 0 per second. Note: this automatic extrapolation calculation uses the deaths statistic: 101,537 deaths in USA 2001 (CDC); 97,860 deaths (NVSR Sep 2001)

Accidental injury: Life Years Lost

Average life years lost from Accidental injury: 32.0 years (SEER)2; 26.5 in North Carolina3; 26.6 average YPLL/person for unintentional injuries in Michigan4.

Death statistics for Accidental injury

The following are statistics from various sources about deaths and Accidental injury:

  • 35.7 per 100,000 people died from unintentional injury in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 63,817 male deaths in the USA 2000 (American Heart Association, 2002)
  • Caused 4% of all deaths in Australia 1988 (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2002)
  • Caused 4,820 deaths in Australia in 1988 (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2002)
  • Caused 3,168 male deaths in Australia in 1988 (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2002)
  • Caused 1,652 female deaths in Australia in 1988 (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2002)
  • 3.8% of all deaths in Australia in 1988 (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2002)
  • 22.5 per 100,000 women died from unintention injury/accidents in USA 2001 (NCHS, 2003)
  • 30.7 per 100,000 Hispanic/Latino people died from unintention injury/accidents in USA 2001 (NCHS, 2003)
  • 35.7 per 100,000 men died from unintention injury/accidents in USA 2001 (NCHS, 2003)
  • 35.7 per 100,000 people died from unintention injury/accidents in USA 2001 (NCHS, 2003)
  • 36.0 per 100,000 white people died from unintention injury/accidents in USA 2001 (NCHS, 2003)
  • 37.6 per 100,000 black people died from unintention injury/accidents in USA 2001 (NCHS, 2003)
  • 51.3 per 100,000 American Indian or Alaska Native people died from unintention injury/accidents in USA 2001 (NCHS, 2003)
  • 8.1 per 100,000 Asian/Pacific Islander people died from unintention injury/accidents in USA 2001 (NCHS, 2003)
  • 42.6 per 100,000 with 12,791 cases of "injury mortality" in Canada 19971
  • 39 people per 100,000 population die from injury and poisoning in Australia 2002 (Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • Death statistics for accidents by age in the USA:
    • accidents caused 4.1% of deaths for any age in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
    • accidents caused 3.0% of deaths less than 1 year old in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
    • accidents caused 8.1% of deaths for non-neonate infants in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
    • accidents caused 36.2% of deaths for age 1-4 years in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
    • accidents caused 42.0% of deaths for age 5-9 years in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
    • accidents caused 39.6% of deaths for age 10-14 years in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
    • accidents caused 48.5% of deaths for age 15-19 years in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
    • accidents caused 41.3% of deaths for age 20-24 years in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
    • accidents caused 29.0% of deaths for age 25-34 years in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
    • accidents caused 17.1% of deaths for age 35-44 years in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
    • accidents caused 7.6% of deaths for age 45-54 years in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
    • accidents caused 3.0% of deaths for age 55-64 years in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
    • accidents caused 1.8% of deaths for age 65 and over years in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
    • accidents caused 1.8% of deaths for age 65-74 years in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
    • accidents caused 1.8% of deaths for age 75-84 years in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
    • accidents caused 1.8% of deaths for age 85 and over in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
  • 1.8 per 100,000 males died from accidental drowning and submersion in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 0.5 per 100,000 females died from accidental drowning and submersion in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 7 per 100,000 males died from accidental poisoning and exposure to noxious substances in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 2.9 per 100,000 females died from accidental poisoning and exposure to noxious substances in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 1.5 per 100,000 males died from accidental exposure to smoke, fire and flames in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 0.9 per 100,000 females died from accidental exposure to smoke, fire and flames in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 0.l5 per 100,000 males died from accidental discharge of firearms in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 0.1 per 100,000 females died from accidental discharge of firearms in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 7.2 per 100,000 males died from fall Injury in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 3.9 per 100,000 females died from fall Injury in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 4 per 100,000 people died from unintentional suffocation in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 14.9 per 100,000 people died from a motor vehicle traffic injury in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 6.8 per 100,000 vehicle occupants died in a traffic motor vehicle accident from in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 1 per 100,000 motorcyclists died from injury in traffic motor vehicle accident in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 0.2 per 100,000 cyclists died from injury in traffic motor vehicle accident in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 1.7 per 100,000 pedestrians died from injuries in motor vehicle accident in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 17.5 per 100,000 people died from transport injury in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 16.4 per 100,000 people died from unintentional transport injury in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 0.0 per 100,000 people died from a suicidal transport injury in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 1.1 per 100,000 people died from homicidal transport injury in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 0.2 per 100,000 people died from machinery injury in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 0.3 per 100,000 people died from unintentional firearm injury in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 0.1 per 100,000 people died from a firearm injury during war or legal intervention in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 1.2 per 100,000 people died from unintentional fire/flame injury in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 1.3 per 100,000 people died from fire or hot object/substance injury in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 1.2 per 100,000 people died from unintentional fire or hot object/substance injury in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 5.5 per 100,000 people died from a fall injury in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 5.3 per 100,000 people died from an unintentional fall injury in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 0.2 per 100,000 people died from a suicidal fall injury in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 1.2 per 100,000 people died from unintentional drowning in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 0.9 per 100,000 people died from a cutting or piercing injury in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 0 per 100,000 people died from unintentional cutting or piercing injury in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • 0.5 per 100,000 people died from natural or environmental injuries in the US 2001 (National Vital Statistics Report, CDC, 2003)
  • Estimated 130 people die each year from non-fire carbon monoxide poisoning in the US 2001 ((US Consumer Product Safety Commission, National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, 2003)
  • Estimated 58% (75) people die each year from non-fire carbon monoxide poisoning caused by heating systems in the US 2001 (US Consumer Product Safety)
  • Estimated 36.4% (28) people die each year from non-fire carbon monoxide poisoning caused by natural gas heating systems in the US 2001 (US Consumer Product Safety)
  • Estimated 20% (26) people die each year from non-fire carbon monoxide poisoning caused by LP gas heating systems in the US 2001 (US Consumer Product Safety)
  • Estimated 13% (10) people die each year from non-fire carbon monoxide poisoning caused by gas ranges or ovens in the US 2001 (US Consumer Product Safety)
  • Estimated 35% (45) people who die each year from non-fire carbon monoxide poisoning are aged 45-64 in the US 2001 (US Consumer Product Safety)
  • Estimated 25% (33) people who die each year from non-fire carbon monoxide poisoning are aged over 65 in the US 2001 (US Consumer Product Safety)
  • Estimated 18% (23) people who die each year from non-fire carbon monoxide poisoning are aged 25-44 in the US 2001 (US Consumer Product Safety)
  • Estimated 70% (90) of deaths each year from non-fire carbon monoxide poisoning occur in homes in the US 2001 (US Consumer Product Safety)
  • 411 people died from electrocutions in the US 2001 (US Consumer Product Safety)
  • 0.63 per million people died from electrocutions in the US 2001 (US Consumer Product Safety)
  • Large appliance were responsible for 19% of electrocution deaths in the US 2001 (US Consumer Product Safety)
  • Installed household wiring was responsible for 11% of electrocution deaths in the US 2001 (US Consumer Product Safety)
  • 920 poisoning deaths were reported to poison control centers in the US 2000 (American Journal of Emergency Medicine, CDC, 2001)
  • 19,741 poisoning deaths were reported to national vital statistics in the US 1999 (WISQARS, CDC, 2001)

Deaths from Accidental injury: medical news summaries

The following medical news items are relevant to death from Accidental injury:

Accidental injury: Hospitalization Statistics

The following are statistics from various sources about hospitalizations and Accidental injury:

  • 1,007,025 patient days spent in private hospitals for injuries and poisoning in Australia 2001-02 (AIHW National Hospital Morbidity Database, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • 1,407,612 patient days spent in public hospitals for injuries and poisoning in Australia 2001-02 (AIHW National Hospital Morbidity Database, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • 32.6% of hospitalisations for injuries and poisoning in public hospitals are single day in Australia 2001-02 (AIHW National Hospital Morbidity Database, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • 87.0% of hospitalisations for injuries and poisoning in private hospitals are single day in Australia 2001-02 (AIHW National Hospital Morbidity Database, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • more stats »

Premium articles about Death:

This section lists our premium articles on topics related to death. These are original authored articles on topics of great interest:



Footnotes:
1. Canadian Injury Data, Statistics Canada, 1996-1997
2. SEER Cancer Statistics Review 1975-2000, National Cancer Institute (NCI)
3. Years of Potential Life Lost in North Carolina, NCMJ March/April 2002, Volume 63, Number 2
4. Division for Vital Records and Health Statistics, MDCH, Michigan, USA

 

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