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Diseases » Addiction » Glossary
 

Glossary for Addiction

  • Absenteeism: Loss of days or absence from school or work as a symptom
  • Addiction conditions: Medical conditions related to addiction of any kind, including substances or behavioral addictions.
  • Addiction symptoms: Symptoms related to addiction (physical or mental addiction)
  • Adhesive abuse: Adhesive abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Adhesives include household glues, rubber cement and model aeroplane glue. These adhesives can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Adhesive addiction: Adhesive addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse adhesives (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Adhesives includes household glue, rubber cement and model airplane glue.
  • Aerosol abuse: Aerosol abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Aerosols include air fresheners, hair spray, spray pain and deodorants. These aerosols can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Aerosol addiction: Aerosol addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse aerosol (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Aerosols includes spray pain, air freshener, deodorants and hair sprays.
  • Alcoholism: Alcoholism is the compulsive urge to drink alcohol despite knowing the negative impact on one's health.
  • Anxiety: A feeling of apprehension, and fear without apparent stimulus that is associated sometime with somatic responses
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Behavioral disorder with hyperactivity and/or inattention.
  • Behavioral disorders: Disorders affecting behavior and emotional wellbeing
  • Bipolar disorder: Cycles of mania and depression; commonly called "manic-depression".
  • Bonnemann-Meinecke-Reich syndrome: A rare disorder characterized mainly by growth problems, vision problems and brain disease.
  • Borderline Personality Disorder: Mental condition with behavioral and emotional problems.
  • Caffeine addiction: Caffeine addiction is the uncontrollable craving for caffeine products such as coffee. Other caffeinated products include diet pills, chocolate, pain killers, cold remedies and soft drinks. Cessation causes withdrawal symptoms which can vary in nature and severity.
  • Cannabis dependence: Addiction to the illicit drug cannabis.
  • Chat room addiction: Chat room addiction refers to the excessive amounts of time spent on computer chat rooms. When the person attempts to reduce the amount of time spent on the activity they suffer withdrawal symptoms such as irritability and anxiety. The preoccupation can cause problems with relationships and even with work performance.
  • Clobazam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Clobazam (an anxiolytic and anticonvulsant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cocaine addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use cocaine on a regular basis. Chronic cocaine use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Computer addiction: Computer addiction refers to the excessive amounts of time spent on the computer. The preoccupation can cause problems with relationships and even with work performance. The time spent on the computer does not refer to work-related activities.
  • Crack addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use crack on a regular basis. Chronic crack use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Crack is a form of cocaine - powdered cocaine is heated with ammonia or sodium bicarbonate to make rocks of crack. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Cravings: Desires for unusual foods.
  • Crystal meth addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use crystal meth on a regular basis. Crystal meth is a powerful stimulant used illegally for its effects. It is highly addictive and known by street names such as ice, speed, glass, crank and chalk. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Depression: Various syndromes with excessive anxiety, phobias, or fear.
  • Drug abuse: Addiction to any of various illicit drugs.
  • Ecstasy addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use ecstasy on a regular basis. Chronic ecstasy use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Ecstasy is a synthetic psychoactive drug often used as a recreational drug. Street names for the drug includes: XTC, Adam, Clarity, Lover's Speed, Hug, Beans and Love Drug. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Exercise: The use of the human muscles to improve ones health
  • Eye symptoms: Symptoms affecting the eye
  • Food addiction: Food addiction refers to compulsive eating that is unrelated to actual hunger. The person feels compelled to eat even when they aren't hungry. Although it is not considered a recognised addiction it can have a significant impact on a person's life and health. Food addicts often have underlying emotional problems.
  • Frisium -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Frisium (an anxiolytic and anticonvulsant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Gambling addiction: Addiction to gambling activities.
  • Gaming addiction: Gaming addiction refers to the excessive amounts of time spent on online computer games. When the person attempts to reduce the amount of time spent on the activity they suffer withdrawal symptoms such as irritability and anxiety. The preoccupation can cause problems with relationships and even with work performance.
  • Heroin dependence: The physical and psychological dependence to the recreational drug heroin
  • Inhalant abuse: Inhalant abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Inhalants include gasoline, adhesives, solvents, and aerosols. These inhalants can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Inhalant addiction: Inhalant addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse inhalants (e.g. inhaling them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Inhalants are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Inhalants includes glues, shoe polish, household cleaners, room deodorizers and nail polish removers.
  • LSD addiction: LSD addiction is the uncontrollable craving for LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide) which is a hallucinogenic drug which is derived from a type of fungus. Although the drug is not technically classified as addictive as it doesn't cause drug-seeking behaviours but increasing tolerance to the drug means that increasing doses of the drug are required to achieve the desired effects. It causes a psychological addiction rather than a physical addiction.
  • Lorazepam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lorazepam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Marijuana addiction: Marijuana addiction is the uncontrollable desire to use marijuana on a regular basis. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Mental health conditions: Medical conditions related to mental health, emotions, behavior, personality, psychology, psychiatry, and so on.
  • Narcotic addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use narcotics on a regular basis. The drug may be used as a therapeutic medication for various conditions but it's use is also frequently abused. Examples of narcotic drugs include heroin, morphine, Demerol and codeine. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Nasal congestion: The congestion of the nasal passages.
  • Nicotine addiction: Nicotine addiction is the uncontrollable desire to continue smoking. Smoking products contain nicotine which is a chemical that can lead to addiction if used over a period of time. Cessation causes withdrawal symptoms which can vary in nature and severity.
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder: Behavioral disorder with obsessive thoughts and compulsive acts.
  • Online gambling addiction: Online gambling addiction refers to the excessive amounts of time and money spent on online gambling. When the person attempts to reduce the amount of time and money spent on the activity they suffer withdrawal symptoms such as irritability and anxiety. The preoccupation can cause problems with finances, relationships and even with work performance.
  • Online shopping addiction: Online shopping addiction refers to the excessive amounts of time and money spent on online shopping, often buying things which are neither wanted or used. When the person attempts to reduce the amount of time and money spent on the activity they suffer withdrawal symptoms such as irritability and anxiety. The preoccupation can cause problems with finances, relationships and even with work performance.
  • Opioid addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use opioids on a regular basis. Opioids may may be prescribed by a physician for the purpose of pain relief but patients may become physically dependent on the drug and continue to obsessively use it even after the condition it was prescribed for has resolved. In other cases, opioid addiction results from the illicit use of the drug for recreational purposes. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling. Examples of opioids includes morphine, heroin, oxycodone and fentanyl.
  • Opium addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use opium on a regular basis. Opium may may be prescribed by a physician for the purpose of pain relief but patients may become physically dependent on the drug and continue to obsessively use it even after the condition it was prescribed for has resolved. In other cases, opium addiction results from the illicit use of the drug for recreational purposes. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Oppositional Defiant Disorder: A behavioral problem that occurs in children and involves persistent disobedience, defiance and hostility towards authority figures. The behavioral problem is greater than the normal pattern of child misbehaviors. The severity of the problem affects the child's ability to perform satisfactorily in home, school and community environments.
  • Oxycontin addiction: Oxycontin is a commonly prescribed pain killer which is recognized as carrying a high risk of addiction. Initial use of the drug may be to control chronic pain but patients may find themselves increasingly dependent on the drug and unable to stop its use. Other cases of addiction may occur when people deliberately and illegally misuse Oxycontin as a recreational drug.
  • Pain killer addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use pain-relieving medication on a regular basis. Pain killers are often prescribed for the treatment of sleeping problems but chronic use can lead to dependence on the drug. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Parkinson's Disease: Degenerative brain condition characterised by tremor.
  • Physical addiction: Physical addiction refers to the compulsive need for a drug or substance in order to prevent the withdrawal symptoms (physical and/or psychological) or due to increased tolerance to the effects of the substance.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Oxazepam: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Oxazepam (a pharmaceutical drug) has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder: Stress following a traumatic event.
  • Prescribed medication addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use prescribed medication in a manner or frequency not prescribed. Drugs such as painkillers are prescribed to treat such things as pain but patients may become physically dependent on the drug and continue to obsessively use it even after the condition it was prescribed for has resolved. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Psychiatric disorders: Any condition that affects ones mind
  • Psychological addiction: Psychological addiction refers to the lack of willpower in fighting against a compulsive need for something i.e. a mental dependence rather than a physical dependence. The addiction stems from psychological or emotional factors. Psychological addictions may involve addictions to drugs, sex, shopping and just about anything else. A person finds themselves unable to resist the source of their addiction.
  • Psychological disorders: Any condition that affects ones mind
  • Psychosis: Mental loss of connection with reality
  • Schizophrenia: A psychiatric disorder characterized by hallucinations and delusional beliefs where a person is unable to distinguish between reality and imagination. The condition tends to have a chronic nature and can be severely debilitating if treatment isn't sought.
  • Sedative dependence: The psychological or physical dependence on sedative medication
  • Sleeping pill addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use sleeping pills on a regular basis. Sleeping pills are often prescribed for the treatment of sleeping problems but chronic use can lead to dependence on the drug. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Social problems: Difficulty relating to other people
  • Society problems: Difficulty interacting in society.
  • Solvent abuse: Solvent abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Solvents include nail polish removers, paint thinners, gasoline, typing correction fluid and toxic markers. These solvents can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Solvent addiction: Solvent addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse solvents (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Solvents are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Solvents includes paint thinner, toxic markers, gasoline, cigarette lighter fluid, typing correction fluid and nail polish removers.
  • Tranquilizer addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use tranquilizers on a regular basis. Tranquilizers are often prescribed for the treatment of anxiety and sleeping problems but chronic use can lead to dependence on the drug. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Valium -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Valium during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Work addiction: Work addiction refers to the excessive amounts of time spent at work. The person feels unable to reduce the amount of time spent at work as it becomes a sole source of fulfilment for them. Family and social relationships often suffer as a consequence. Although it is not considered a recognised addiction it can have a significant impact on a person's life. Workaholics often have underlying emotional problems.

 

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