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Diseases » Anemia » Summary
 

What is Anemia?

What is Anemia?

Anemia is a general term for the most common blood disorder in the U.S. Anemia occurs when there are too few red blood cells in the blood. ...more »

  • Anemia: Reduced ability of blood to carry oxygen from various possible causes.
  • Anemia: A reduction in the number of red blood cells per cu mm, the amount of hemoglobin in 100 ml of blood, and the volume of packed red blood cells per 100 ml of blood. Clinically, anemia represents a reduction in the oxygen-transporting capacity of a designated volume of blood, resulting from an imbalance between blood loss (through hemorrhage or hemolysis) and blood production. Signs and symptoms of anemia may include pallor of the skin and mucous membranes, shortness of breath, palpitations of the heart, soft systolic murmurs, lethargy, and fatigability. --2004
    Source - Diseases Database
  • Anemia: a deficiency of red blood cells.
    Source - WordNet 2.1

Anemia: Introduction

Types of Anemia:

Types of Anemia:

Broader types of Anemia:

How many people get Anemia?

Prevalance of Anemia: 3.5 million (NHLBI)
Prevalance Rate of Anemia: approx 1 in 77 or 1.29% or 3.5 million people in USA [about data]

Who gets Anemia?

Gender Profile for Anemia: More common in females

How serious is Anemia?

Complications of Anemia: see complications of Anemia
Deaths for Anemia: 4,503 deaths reported in USA 1999 (NVSR Sep 2001)

What causes Anemia?

Causes of Anemia: see causes of Anemia
Risk factors for Anemia: see risk factors for Anemia

What are the symptoms of Anemia?

Symptoms of Anemia: see symptoms of Anemia

Complications of Anemia: see complications of Anemia

Anemia: Testing

Diagnostic testing: see tests for Anemia.

Misdiagnosis: see misdiagnosis and Anemia.

How is it treated?

Treatments for Anemia: see treatments for Anemia
Alternative treatments for Anemia: see alternative treatments for Anemia
Research for Anemia: see research for Anemia

Society issues for Anemia

Costs of Anemia: $6.4 billion with $4.9b direct, $0.6b morbidity, $0.9b mortality (NHLBI 2002)
Hospitalizations for Anemia: 232,000 (NHLBI 1999)

Hospitalization statistics for Anemia: The following are statistics from various sources about hospitalizations and Anemia:

  • 1.04% (132,660) of hospital episodes were for anaemia in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 84% of hospital consultations for anaemia required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 42% of hospital episodes for anaemia were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 58% of hospital episodes for anaemia were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 31% of hospital admissions for anaemia required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 7.2 days was the mean length of stay in hospitals for anaemia in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • more statistics...»


Physician office visits for Anemia: 2,233 (NHLBI 1999)

Organs Affected by Anemia:

Organs and body systems related to Anemia include:

Name and Aliases of Anemia

Main name of condition: Anemia

Other names or spellings for Anemia:

anaemia

Anaemia, Haemoglobin levels low (peripheral blood), Hemoglobin low Source - Diseases Database

Anemia, Anaemia
Source - WordNet 2.1

Anemia: Related Conditions

Research the causes of these diseases that are similar to, or related to, Anemia:

 

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