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Diseases » Angina » Glossary
 

Glossary for Angina

  • Abdominal obesity metabolic syndrome: A syndrome characterized by a group of conditions that are considered major risk factors for diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease.
  • Acid reflux / heartburn:
  • Albuterol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Albuterol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Alcohol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Alcohol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amyloid cardiopathy: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage and is potentially fatal. The cardiac form involves deposits of amyloid in the heart muscle which affects its function. The electrical conduction system of the heart is impaired.
  • Anemia: Reduced ability of blood to carry oxygen from various possible causes.
  • Angina Pectoris: Variant of Angina Pectoris, where episodic chest pain occurs without exertion or provocation, due to a transient spasm of a coronary artery; more common in women
  • Aorta conditions: Conditions that affect the aorta
  • Aortic valve disease: Disease of the heart's aortic valve
  • Aortic valve stenosis: A congenital condition involving a malformation of the valve that controls the blood flow of the main heart vessel (aorta). The valve doesn't open enough to allow sufficient blood to flow through the aorta which reduces the supply of oxygenated blood to the body.
  • Atheroma: A region of plaque occurring in atherosclerosis
  • Atherosclerosis: Atherosclerosis is a syndrome affecting arterial blood vessels. It is a chronic inflammatory response in the walls of arteries, in large part due to the accumulation of macrophage white blood cells and promoted by low density (especially small particle) lipoproteins (plasma proteins that carry cholesterol and triglycerides) without adequate removal of fats and cholesterol from the macrophages by functional high density lipoproteins (HDL). It is commonly referred to as a hardening or furring of the arteries. It is caused by the formation of multiple plaques within the arteries.
  • Carbon disulfide-induced cardiovascular disease: Chronic exposure to certain chemicals can cause cardiovascular disease. For example, exposure to Carbon disulfide can lead to heart disease and carries a risk of premature death as a result. Chronic exposure to these sort of chemicals is most likely to occur in a work environment. Carbon disulfide is used mainly in viscose rayon manufacturing but is also used as a solvent and in other process. Exposure usually occurs through inhalation of vapours but skin absorption can also occur. Reported cases haf cardiovascular disease has occurred among workers exposed to carbon disulfide concentrations of 20-60 ppm.
  • Cardiovascular Disease: Diseases of the heart or blood vessels including cerebrovascular diseases such as stroke.
  • Cerebrotendinous Xanthomatosus: A rare syndrome where a genetic mutation results in a metabolic disorders caused by a deficiency of sterol 27-hydroxylase deficiency. The condition causes progressive neurological dysfunction, cataracts and premature atherosclerosis. Deposits of cholesterol and cholestanol can be found in any part of the body including the brain. The rate of progression and severity of symptoms varying amongst patients. The degree of neurological involvement is also variable.
  • Chemical-induced cardiovascular disease: Chronic exposure to certain chemicals can cause cardiovascular disease. For example, exposure to Carbon disulfide can lead to heart disease and carries a risk of premature death as a result. Chronic exposure to these sort of chemicals is most likely to occur in a work environment.
  • Chest conditions: Any condition affecting the chest
  • Chest discomfort: The sensation of discomfort that is located in the chest
  • Chest pain: Pain in the chest area.
  • Chest tightness: The sensation of tightness located in the chest
  • Choking: Sensation of blockage or inability to breathe.
  • Cigarette Smoking -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that cigarette smoking during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Circulatory system conditions: Medical conditions affecting the heart and the circulatory system.
  • Climbing stairs: difficulty in climbing stairs is seen in certain disorders
  • Coronary heart disease: Disease affecting the heart's arteries (narrowed arteries)
  • Dissecting aortic aneurysm: aortic dissection is a potentially life-threatening condition in which there is bleeding into and along the wall of the aorta, the major artery leaving the heart
  • Duodenal ulcer: A peptic ulcer is erosion in the lining of the stomach or duodenum (the first part of the small intestine). The word "peptic" refers to pepsin, a stomach enzyme that breaks down proteins. If a peptic ulcer is located in the stomach it is called a gastric ulcer.
  • Eisenmenger Syndrome: Increased lung blood pressure that can result from conditions such as a hole in the wall between the two heart chambers.
  • Emotional stress: A condition which occurs when a person is under stress affecting their emotions
  • Exercise: The use of the human muscles to improve ones health
  • Fabry's Disease: Genetic fat storage disorder
  • Familial Hypercholesterolemia: A genetic abnormality which causes patients to have abnormally high cholesterol levels (low-density lipoproteins). The condition usually leads to early cardiovascular disease.
  • Familial hyperlipoproteinemia: A group of genetic disorder characterized by abnormal breakdown of lipoproteins which causes abnormal lipoprotein and lipid levels in the blood. There are various types of this condition: hyperlipoproteinemia type I, II, III, IV and V. The type and severity of symptoms vary between types. The disorder tends to run in families (familial).
  • Heart attack: Serious and often fatal acute heart condition
  • Heart cancer: A malignancy that is located in the heart
  • Heart conditions: Any condition that affects the heart
  • Heart damage: Any damage that occurs to the heart
  • Heart disease: Any of various heart conditions.
  • Heart muscle conditions: Medical conditions affecting the muscle of the heart.
  • Heartburn: Pain from stomach acid coming back up the esophagus
  • High Blood Pressure/Hypertension:
  • High Cholesterol: High levels of blood cholesterol, triglycerides, or other lipids.
  • Hyperlipoproteinemia type 3: A rare genetic disorder characterized by the body's impaired ability to break down certain lipids (triglycerides) which results in their buildup in the blood.
  • Hypertension: High blood pressure
  • Indigestion: Various eating symptoms of indigestion (dyspepsia)
  • Iron deficiency anemia: Iron-deficiency anemia is a blood condition characterized by low levels of iron in the body which leads to a reduction in the number of red blood cells.
  • Keratosis palmoplantaris -- adenocarcinoma of the colon: A rare disorder characterized by cancer of the secretory lining of the colon as well as thickening of the skin on the palms and soles. The colon cancer tends to grow slowly.
  • Lipoproteinemia: A disorder in which the proteins that carry fat around the body are defective.
  • Long QT syndrome type 10: A genetic heart disorder characterized by an abnormal heart rhythm (long Q-T interval) where the heart takes longer than normal to recharge between beats. The severity of the condition can vary. Type 10 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect (SCN4B gene on chromosome 11q23).
  • Long QT syndrome type 11: A genetic heart disorder characterized by an abnormal heart rhythm (long Q-T interval) where the heart takes longer than normal to recharge between beats. The severity of the condition can vary. Type 11 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect (chromosome 7q21-q22).
  • Long QT syndrome type 2: A genetic heart disorder characterized by an abnormal heart rhythm (long Q-T interval) where the heart takes longer than normal to recharge between beats. The severity of the condition can vary. Type 3 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect (chromosome 7).
  • Long QT syndrome type 3: A genetic heart disorder characterized by an abnormal heart rhythm (long Q-T interval) where the heart takes longer than normal to recharge between beats. The severity of the condition can vary. Type 3 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect (chromosome 3p21).
  • Long QT syndrome type 4: A very rare genetic heart disorder characterized by an abnormal heart rhythm (long Q-T interval) where the heart takes longer than normal to recharge between beats. The severity of the condition can vary. Type 4 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect (gene for Ankyrin B on chromosome 4q25-q27).
  • Long QT syndrome type 5: A genetic heart disorder characterized by an abnormal heart rhythm (long Q-T interval) where the heart takes longer than normal to recharge between beats. The severity of the condition can vary. Type 5 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect (KCNE1 gene on chromosome 21q22.1-q22.2).
  • Long QT syndrome type 6: A genetic heart disorder characterized by an abnormal heart rhythm (long Q-T interval) where the heart takes longer than normal to recharge between beats. The severity of the condition can vary. Type 6 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect (KCNE2 gene on chromosome 21q22.1).
  • Long QT syndrome type 9: A genetic heart disorder characterized by an abnormal heart rhythm (long Q-T interval) where the heart takes longer than normal to recharge between beats. The severity of the condition can vary. Type 9 is distinguished from other types by the origin of the genetic defect (caveolin 3 gene on chromosome 3p25).
  • Lyme disease: Lyme disease is an emerging infectious disease caused by at least three species of bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia.
  • Methylphenidate -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Methylphenidate during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Microvascular angina: A condition which is characterized by angina like chest pain which is caused by microvascular disease
  • Myocarditis: Inflammation of the myocardium (muscle walls of the heart)
  • Pain: A feeling of suffering, agony, distress caused by the stimulation of pain fibres in the nervous system
  • Pain conditions: Diseases characterized by pain and pain-like symptoms.
  • Pericarditis: Inflammation of the membrane surrounding the heart
  • Pheochromocytoma: Pheochromocytoma is a neuroendocrine tumor of the medulla of the adrenal glands (originating in the chromaffin cells), or extra-adrenal chromaffin tissue that failed to involute after birth and secretes excessive amounts of catecholamines, usually epinephrine and norepinephrine.
  • Primary pulmonary hypertension: Primary pulmonary hypertension refers to high blood pressure in the arteries that carry blood to the lungs for no apparent reason. Blood pressure in other parts of the body is normal or sometimes even low.
  • Pseudoxanthoma elasticum, forme fruste: An inherited systemic disease of connective tissue involving progressive calcification and degeneration of elastic fibers throughout the body, including the skin, eyes and cardiovascular system.
  • Pulmonary valve stenosis: Often a congenital defect but may be caused by such things as rheumatic fever or bacterial endocarditis. Severity depends on the degree of narrowing of the pulmonary valve.
  • Reflux: Rising stomach acid up the esophagus
  • Respiratory infections: Any infection that occurs to the respiratory system
  • Romano-Ward syndrome: A genetic heart disorder characterized by an abnormal heart rhythm (long Q-T interval) where the heart takes longer than normal to recharge between beats. The severity of the condition can vary.
  • Senior health conditions: Medical conditions affecting seniors, male or female.
  • Shingles: Infectious viral infection occuring years after chickenpox infection.
  • Shortness of breath: The feeling of being short of breath
  • Sphingolipidosis: A group of diseases involving the abnormal metabolism and storage of a substance called sphingolipid. Symptoms will vary depending on the disease. Examples of diseases from this group include gangliosidosis, Gaucher's disease and Niemann-Pick disease.
  • Sudden Arrhythmia Death Syndrome: A genetic heart disorder characterized by an abnormal heart rhythm which can result in sudden death in otherwise healthy people. It is caused by a genetic defect which affects the hearts electrical activity. Examples of disorders that can cause lethal heart rhythm abnormalities are Long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, certain drugs, idiopathic ventricular fibrillation and sodium channel disease.
  • Sumatriptan -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Sumatriptan during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Terbutaline -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Terbutaline during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Unstable angina: A condition which is characterized by chest pain of heart origin that occurs without stimuli

 

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