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Symptoms of Anxiety

Symptoms of Anxiety: Introduction

The symptoms of anxiety are due to the body's reaction to stress called the fright, fight or flight response. This reaction developed in early human evolution as a means to increase alertness and readiness to react to dangerous stressors, such as the threat of a man-eating predator. When confronted with a stressor, the body's nervous system reacts by releasing the chemical epinephrine, also known as adrenalin. Epinephrine produces effects that make the body better able to physically "fight or take flight" from a stressor. Effects include increased alertness and a more rapid breathing and heart rate, which prepares the muscles with extra oxygen and energy they need to work hard.

In today's world people most often experience stressors that cannot be addressed effectively by fighting or running away. However, epinephrine still circulates through the body in response to modern stressors, such as balancing finances on a tight budget, cramming for a test, going through a divorce, or being late for an important appointment. This results in symptoms that can include shortness of breath, palpitations, chest pain, sweating, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, muscle tension, and insomnia.

Typical symptoms of excessive anxiety can include trouble with concentration, feeling tense, irritable, and restless.

One characteristic of an anxiety disorder is that anxiety is so extreme that instead of helping a person to deal with stress, anxiety begins to impact the ability to cope and live a normal life. For example, driving slowly and cautiously on a snowy day is a normal reaction to the stress a slippery road presents. On the other hand, being so anxious about snow that a person is completely unable to come out of the house on a snowy day is an excessive reaction that will eventually negatively impact a person's life....more about Anxiety »

Anxiety symptoms: Symptoms of anxiety run the gamut from almost unnoticeable, such as a mild elevation in heart rate, to so extreme that they can interfere with the activities of daily living. This can include having anxiety about closed in spaces that is so excessive that a person refuses to use an elevator. The symptoms of anxiety are related to a physiological human reaction called the fright, fight or flight response. This reaction developed in early human evolution as a means to increase alertness and readiness to react to dangerous stressors, such as the threat of a man-eating predator. When confronted with stress, such as danger, the body's nervous system reacts by releasing the chemical epinephrine, also known as adrenalin. Epinephrine produces effects that make our body's better able to physically "fight or take flight" from a danger. These include increasing the breathing and heart rate so the muscles get the extra oxygen and energy they need to work hard.

In today's world people most often experience stressors that cannot be addressed effectively by fighting or running away, such as balancing finances on a tight budget, cramming for a test, going through a divorce, or running late for an important appointment. However, epinephrine still circulates through the body in response to these types of stressors. Large amounts of epinephrine can result in symptoms, such as heart palpitations, shortness of breath, and chest pain. When physical symptoms such as these are experienced, it is very important not to assume they are due to anxiety. Seek professional medical care immediately....more about Anxiety »

Symptoms of Anxiety

The list of signs and symptoms mentioned in various sources for Anxiety includes the 40 symptoms listed below:

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Anxiety: Symptom Checkers

Review the available symptom checkers for these symptoms of Anxiety:

Anxiety: Symptom Assessment Questionnaires

Review the available Assessment Questionnaires for the symptoms of Anxiety:

Anxiety: Complications

Read information about complications of Anxiety.

Research More About Anxiety

Do I have Anxiety?

Anxiety: Medical Mistakes

Anxiety: Undiagnosed Conditions

Diseases that may be commonly undiagnosed in related medical areas:

Home Diagnostic Testing

Home medical tests related to Anxiety:

Wrongly Diagnosed with Anxiety?

The list of other diseases or medical conditions that may be on the differential diagnosis list of alternative diagnoses for Anxiety includes:

Anxiety: Research Doctors & Specialists

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More about symptoms of Anxiety:

More information about symptoms of Anxiety and related conditions:

Other Possible Causes of these Symptoms

Click on any of the symptoms below to see a full list of other causes including diseases, medical conditions, toxins, drug interactions, or drug side effect causes of that symptom.

Anxiety as a symptom:

For a more detailed analysis of Anxiety as a symptom, including causes, drug side effect causes, and drug interaction causes, please see our Symptom Center information for Anxiety.

Medical articles and books on symptoms:

These general reference articles may be of interest in relation to medical signs and symptoms of disease in general:

About signs and symptoms of Anxiety:

The symptom information on this page attempts to provide a list of some possible signs and symptoms of Anxiety. This signs and symptoms information for Anxiety has been gathered from various sources, may not be fully accurate, and may not be the full list of Anxiety signs or Anxiety symptoms. Furthermore, signs and symptoms of Anxiety may vary on an individual basis for each patient. Only your doctor can provide adequate diagnosis of any signs or symptoms and whether they are indeed Anxiety symptoms.

 

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