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Diseases » Arthritis » Glossary
 

Glossary for Arthritis

  • Ackerman Dermatitis Syndrome: A rare condition characterized by the association of skin and joint symptoms. It is characterized by arthritis preceded by a skin rash (interstitial granulomatous dermatitis) which can vary in appearance from person to person. The condition tends to go through periods of flares and remission.
  • Acrodysostosis: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short hands, small nose, mental deficiency and hand and foot deformities.
  • Acromegaly: A hormonal disorder involving excess growth hormone production by the pituitary gland.
  • Acute rheumatic fever: Bacterial joint infection with risk of heart complications.
  • Adult onset Still's disease: A form of Still's disease that has a later onset and involves arthralgia or arthritis and a characteristic rash that often appears during periods of temperature increase.
  • Alkaptonuria: A rare disorder where the abnormal accumulation of a particular acid (homogentisic acid) in the body causes connective tissue and bone damage. This damage gives tissues a dark or bluish discoloration.
  • Amyloidosis: A rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage and is potentially fatal. Symptoms depend on the organs involved. There are numerous forms of the condition: primary amyloidosis, secondary amyloidosis, hemodialysis-associated amyloidosis and familial amyloidosis.
  • Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma: A form of cancer which tends to be systemic in nature and thus cancer cells can be found in various parts of the body such as the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, skin and bone marrow.
  • Ankle conditions: Conditions that affect the ankle
  • Ankylosing Spondylitis: Inflammation of spinal joints similar to rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Arbovirosis: An infectious disease caused by an arbovirus. The virus is transmitted by arthropods such as insects and ticks. Examples of arboviruses include Yellow Fever, Japanese encephalitis and tick-borne encephalitis. The symptoms may vary depending on the type of virus involved. The infection can lead to life-threatening brain inflammation.
  • Arthralgia: Pain in the joints, often a symptom of arthritis.
  • Arthritis -- short stature -- deafness: A very rare syndrome characterized by arthritis, short stature, deafness and numerous other abnormalities.
  • Arthritis-like conditions: Medical conditions highly related to or similar to arthritis.
  • Arthropathy, progressive pseudorheumatoid, of childhood: A form of progressive rheumatoid arthritis that affects children.
  • Asian Dendorlimus pini caterpillar poisoning: A chronic illness caused by contact with certain a poisonous caterpillar called Dendorlimus pini. Contact with the cocoon can also cause symptoms. These caterpillars can be found in Asia, north Africa and eastern Europe.
  • Autoimmune Vasculitis: A inflammation of the blood vessels caused by an autoimmune reaction
  • Behcet's Disease: Recurring inflammation of small blood vessels affecting various areas.
  • Benazepril Hydrochloride -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on rats indicate that the use of Benazepril Hydrochloride during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • Besnier-Boeck-Schaumann disease: A rare disease where inflammatory granular nodules form in various organs.
  • Biliary cirrhosis: Biliary cirrhosis is a condition where the bile ducts are unable to transport bile effectively due to blockage, inflammation, scarring or some other damage to the bile ducts. The condition may result from such things as congenital defect of the bile ducts (e.g. biliary atresia), cystic fibrosis, gallstones or a variety of other secondary conditions. The cause of primary biliary cirrhosis is not fully understood.
  • Bismuth -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on sheep indicate that the use of Bismuth during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • Bone cancer: Malignancy that occurs in the bone
  • Brachydactylous dwarfism, Mseleni type: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by progressive joint disease, short stature and short fingers and toes. The joint disease affects mainly the hips, knees, ankles and spine. The condition can eventually lead to disability and hip and/or knee replacements in serious cases.
  • Brachydactyly -- tibial hypoplasia: A rare syndrome characterized by short digits and an underdeveloped or absent shin bone.
  • Bumetanide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Bumetanide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • CRMO, juvenile: A rare chronic inflammatory bone disease that occurs in children. The symptoms go into periods of remission only to return. The most common sites for the inflammation are the shinbone, thighbone and collarbone with usually several sites being affected at once.
  • Campylobacter food poisoning: Common bacterial infection usually from chicken.
  • Caplan's syndrome: Scarring and inflammation of lungs in people with rheumatoid arthritis who have also had exposure to coal dust. Also called rheumatoid pneumoconiosis.
  • Carbimazole -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Carbimazole during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Carcinoid syndrome: Carcinoid heart disease is a rare, metastatic disease that occurs predominantly in the right heart. The tricuspid and pulmonic valves are affected, leading to right heart failure, which results in increased morbidity and mortality.
  • Carnevale-Canun-Mendoza syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by loss of bone tissue in the wrists and ankles as well as kidney problems.
  • Cauda equina syndrome: Is a neurological syndrome which occurs when a vertebral disc protrudes and compresses the spinal cord.
  • Chromosome 22q deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where the long arm of chromosome 22 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chronic Illness: Any form of continuing chronic illness.
  • Chronic Pain Syndromes: Any of a variety of disorders that can cause chronic pain of different types.
  • Ciprofloxacin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ciprofloxacin (a fluoroquinolone antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Connective tissue disorders: Any condition affecting connective tissues.
  • Crohn's disease: Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. The disease can affect any area from the mouth to the anus. It often affects the lower part of the small intestine called the ileum.
  • Crystal deposit disease: A group of diseases characterized by the deposit of crystals in body tissues. Some examples of such disorders includes scleroderma, dermatomyositis, arthritis and kidney disease. The severity and type of symptoms depend on the nature and location of the crystals deposited.
  • Decompression sickness: Condition from overly rapid decompression, especially when diving.
  • Dendrolimiasis: A chronic illness caused by contact with certain poisonous caterpillar spines or urticating hairs.
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis: A form of degenerative arthritis characterized by calcification on the sides of the spine vertebrae as well as inflammation and calcification of tendons where they attach to bone which often results in bone spurs.
  • Dressler syndrome: A group of symptoms that can occur days, weeks or months after a heart attack or heart surgery. The symptoms may be due to such things as autoimmune processes, virus or bleeding around the heart which can result in inflammation of the membrane surrounding the heart.
  • Dwarfism -- stiff joint -- ocular abnormalities: A very rare form of dwarfism characterized by short stature as well as stiff joints and eye abnormalities.
  • E-coli food poisoning: Type of bacterial food poisoning
  • Endocarditis: Inflammation of the inner lining of the heart
  • Eng Strom syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by short stature and episodes of locked finger joints.
  • Epiglotitis: Inflamation of the epiglottis in the throat
  • Erythema elevatum diutinum: A rare chronic skin disorder characterized by skin nodules and plaques near joints and on the back of the hands and feet.
  • Falls: When a person losses balance and falls over
  • Familial Granulomatosis, Blau type: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Familial, Systemic, Juvenile Granulomatosis: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Farber's disease: A rare inherited biochemical disorder involving the deficiency of an enzyme called ceramidase resulting in the harmful accumulation of certain chemicals in the body which causes damage and inflammation.
  • Felty Syndrome: A rare complication of long-term rheumatoid arthritis which involves an enlarged spleen and blood abnormalities.
  • Fibromyalgia: A difficult to diagnose condition affecting the muscles and/or joints
  • Flat feet: Lowered arch of the foot
  • Fluorosis: Excessive fluoride in the body
  • Food poisoning: Poisoning from a substance or microbe in food.
  • Gout: Painful joints, most commonly the big toe.
  • Graft-versus-host disease: A disease characterised by an immune response as a result of a transplantation or transfusion resulting in a widespread systemic inflammatory response
  • Hemochromatosis: Excess of iron leading to problems with joints, liver, heart and pancreas.
  • Hemochromatosis type 1: A genetic disorder where too much iron is absorbed from food and it is stored in various parts of the body which can cause damage. Type 1 is the most common form of the disorder, has an adult onset and is inherited recessively.
  • Hemochromatosis type 2: A rare genetic disorder where too much iron is absorbed from food and it is stored in various parts of the body which can cause damage. Type 2 is a more severe type, has a juvenile onset and is inherited recessively.
  • Hemochromatosis type 3: A rare genetic disorder where too much iron is absorbed from food and it is stored in various parts of the body which can cause damage. Type 3 has an onset that is between type 1 and type 2 and is inherited recessively.
  • Hemochromatosis type 4: A rare genetic disorder where too much iron is absorbed from food and it is stored in various parts of the body which can cause damage. Type 4 has an adult onset but is inherited dominantly.
  • Hemochromatosis-related diabetes: A single-gene disease that causes iron accumulation in the tissues of the body. Diabetes is a primary complication if hemochromatosis goes untreated. Hemochromatosis is sometimes referred to as "bronze diabetes."
  • Hemophilia: Blood disease usually genetic causing failure to clot.
  • Hemophilus influenzae B: Bacterial respiratory infection with dangerous complications.
  • Hepatitis A: Contagious viral infection of the liver
  • Hereditary Hemochromatosis: A genetic disorder where too much iron is absorbed from food and it is stored in various parts of the body which can cause damage. There are 4 types of hemochromatosis and they are distinguished by age of onset, genetic cause and type of inheritance. Some sufferers may be asymptomatic.
  • Hip conditions: Any condition that affects the hip
  • Human adjuvant disease: This is a connective tissue disease that affects some people after the injection of synthetic material for cosmetic surgery
  • Human parvovirus B19 infection: An infectious disease caused by parovirus B19 which causes fifth disease and erythema infectiosum.
  • Hypersecretion of growth hormone: increased production of growth hormone from the pituitary gland
  • Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis: A rare condition characterized by the presence of recurring urticarial vasculitis, arthralgia or arthritis and hypocomplementemia. Hypocomplementemia involves a reduction or absence of blood complement which is a part of the body's immune system which destroying invading bacteria or other pathogens.
  • IgA nephropathy: A rare disorder where kidney inflammation leads to a build up of the antibody (IgA) in the kidney which results in the characteristic symptom of blood in the urine.
  • Immunodeficiency due to interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 deficiency: Susceptibility to infection as a result of a genetic defect which affects immunity. Infections tend to be severe and can be life-threatening.
  • Infantile multisystem inflammatory disease: A rare autoinflammatory disease characterized by fever, rash, arthritic changes, eye problems and chronic meningitis.
  • Infection: Infections as a symptom.
  • Infectious arthritis: A rare condition where arthritis occurs as a result of joint infection by a bacteria, virus or fungus. Symptoms vary according to the infection type.
  • Inflammatory bowel disease: Inflammatory bowel disease refers to digestive symptoms resulting from chronic bowel inflammation. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are two of the main subtypes of the disease. Scientists have discovered an array of genetic mutations which can result in an increased susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease. Not all people with the genetic anomaly will develop the condition but it can increase the risk especially if other environmental factors are also present. The severity of the disease that develops is variable.
  • Injury: Any damage inflicted in the body
  • Interstitial nephritis: A condition which is characterized by disease of the renal interstitial tissue
  • Invasive candidiasis: Severe fungal infection usually in immunocompromised persons
  • Irritable bowel syndrome: Spasms in the colon wall
  • Isotretinoin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Isotretinoin (an acne treatment drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Jacobs syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by heart inflammation (pericardium), joint disease and permanent finger flexion. The number of joints affected is variable.
  • Jaffe-Lichtenstein-Sutro syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by pain and limited movement in one or more large joints such as the knee.
  • Joint pain: Pain affecting the joints
  • Joint swelling: One or more swollen joints
  • Joint symptoms: Symptoms affecting the joints.
  • Joint tenderness: Diverse processes that affect the joint, including inflammation, cartilage degeneration, crystal deposition, infection, and trauma, can be a cause of the pain.
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A group of chronic inflammatory joint disorders that affects children. The condition generally involves periods of time where the condition is active followed by periods of abatement of symptoms. In some cases, the condition can be systemic and can cause symptoms such as fever and rash with organ involvement. There are three main types of juvenile idiopathic arthritis - oligoarticular, polyarticular and systemic (Still's disease).
  • Kawasaki disease: A childhood illness that generally affects the skin, mouth and lymph nodes.
  • Knee conditions: Any condition that affects the knee
  • Leukocytoclastic angiitis -- systemic: Inflammation of small blood vessels. Usually the small blood vessels in the skin are involved but sometimes small blood vessels in other organs such as joints, kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract may be involved. Symptoms become more serious once there is systemic (organ) involvement and death may result in some severe cases.
  • Leukoencephalopathy, arthritis, colitis and hypogammaglobulinemia: A rare syndrome characterized by brain disease, arthritis, colitis and immune system problems.
  • Leukoencephalopathy, arthritis, colitis, and hypogammaglobulinema: A rare condition characterized by the association of arthritis, colitis, low blood gammaglobulin levels and brain anomalies.
  • Lissencephaly -- immunodeficiency: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal brain development and a poor immune system.
  • Lockwood-Feingold syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized mainly by arthritis, skeletal abnormalities and a lack of subcutaneous fat.
  • Lupus: Autoimmune disease with numerous effects on various organs and linings.
  • Lyme disease: Lyme disease is an emerging infectious disease caused by at least three species of bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia.
  • Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis: Rodent-borne viral disease often causing meningitis or encephalitis
  • Mansonelliasis: Infection with a nematode (worm-like parasite) called Mansonella. Transmission usually occurs through the bite of a midge.
  • McCune-Albright Syndrome: A rare genetic multisystem disorder characterized by abnormal skin pigmentation and endocrine gland dysfunction and replacement of parts of bone tissue with fibrous material.
  • Meningococcemia: A rare infectious disease whose main symptoms are upper respiratory tract infection, fever, rash and eye and ear problems.
  • Methimazole -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Methimazole during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Mixed connective tissue disease: A rare disorder of the connective tissue which affects a range of body tissues and organs.
  • Mucolipidosis III: A rare metabolic disorder where deficiency of a particular enzyme leads to the buildup of mucopolysaccharides and mucolipids in the body which is harmful to the body and leads to premature death.
  • Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis: A rare condition characterized by the proliferation of histiocytes (immune cells) which causes destructive arthritis and skin nodules.
  • Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short stature and limb, joint and hip abnormalities which become evident from two to 10 years.
  • Musculoskeletal conditions: Medical conditions affecting the musculoskeletal system of bones, muscles and related structures.
  • Mycoplasma pneumoniae: Bacterial respiratory infection
  • Myhre Syndrome: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by retarded growth, mental retardation, bone abnormalities and distinctive facial features.
  • Nalidixic Acid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Nalidixic Acid during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Non-Specific Urethritis: Urethral infection usually sexually transmitted
  • Non-pathogenic inflammatory conditions: Medical disorders that cause inflammation, but are not due to any infectious pathogen.
  • Norfloxacin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Norfloxacin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Obesity: An increase in the body weight greater than that required for normal function that is characterised by the accumulation of excessive fat
  • Osteoarthritis: Osteoarthritis is a chronic condition characterised by mechanical disrturbances due to degradation of joints. It is the most common form of arthritis, and the leading cause of chronic disability.
  • Osteochondritis Dissecans: A rare condition caused by an interruption of the blood supply to section of bone in a joint which can result in a piece of bone breaking off and causing pain. The knee is most often affected but it can occur in ankles and elbows.
  • Otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia: A rare genetic disorder where abnormal bone growth causes hearing loss, skeletal abnormalities and characteristic facial features.
  • Paget's disease of bone: A chronic, slowly progressing bone disorder where the bone is destroyed rapidly and replaced by abnormal bone which is dense and fragile.
  • Pain conditions: Diseases characterized by pain and pain-like symptoms.
  • Palindromic rheumatism: A rare disorder involving periodic inflammation in and around joints. Eventually, rheumatoid arthritis may develop if the condition persists.
  • Polyarteritis nodosa: A serious blood vessel disease where small and medium-sized arteries become swollen and damaged and are unable to adequately supply oxygenated blood to various tissues in the body. The disease can occur in a mild form or a serious, rapidly fatal form.
  • Polyarthritis, systemic: A chronic inflammatory disease (usually autoimmune) that causes inflammation in multiple parts of the body and causes arthritis in five or more joints.
  • Polychondritis: A serious, progressive, episodic condition characterized by inflammation and degeneration of cartilage in the body. The duration and severity of the episodes can vary.
  • Polymyalgia rheumatica: A condition characterized by muscle pain and stiffness, fatigue and fever. It is often associated with giant-cell arteritis which is a related but more serious condition.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Propylthiouracil: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Propylthiouracil has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure. Propylthiouracil is a pharmaceutical drug used to treat hyperthyroidism.
  • Post-infectious reactive arthropathy: Joint disease that occurs up to a month following an infection in some other part of the body.
  • Primary Biliary Cirrhosis 1: Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic condition involving progressive destruction of the bile ducts in the liver. This results in an abnormal buildup of bile in the liver which eventually progresses to liver failure. Primary biliary cirrhosis 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 3p12-q13.2.
  • Primary Biliary Cirrhosis 2: Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic condition involving progressive destruction of the bile ducts in the liver. This results in an abnormal buildup of bile in the liver which eventually progresses to liver failure. Primary biliary cirrhosis 2 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Primary Biliary Cirrhosis 3: Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic condition involving progressive destruction of the bile ducts in the liver. This results in an abnormal buildup of bile in the liver which eventually progresses to liver failure. Primary biliary cirrhosis 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1p31.2.
  • Primary biliary cirrhosis: Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic and progressive cholestatic disease of the liver.
  • Pseudoachondroplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by bone growth and development abnormalities.
  • Pseudogout: A condition which is characterized by an acute inflammatory arthropathy caused by calcium pyrophosphate crystals
  • Psoriasis: Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin condition where the defective immune system causes skin cells to grow rapidly. It affects a significant number of people. Arthritis, which can be severe, is associated with the psoriasis in up to a third of cases. Not all patients who are susceptible to the condition will develop it - roughly 10% of those susceptible will actually develop the condition. There are various environmental factors which can trigger the onset of the disease e.g. strep throat (common trigger), some medication, stress and cold weather. Once the disease develops, it may resolve on its own or with treatment or may become a persistent chronic condition. The severity and duration of symptoms is variable.
  • Psoriatic Arthritis: Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic disease characterized by inflammation of the skin (psoriasis) and joints (arthritis). Psoriatic arthritis is said to be a seronegative spondyloarthropathy and therefore occurs more commonly in patients with tissue type HLA-B27.
  • Psoriatic Arthritis, susceptibility to: An inflammatory condition where the defective immune system causes joint inflammation as well as skin cells to grow rapidly causing psoriasis. Not all patients who are susceptible to the condition will develop it. There are various environmental factors which can trigger the onset of the disease e.g. strep throat (common trigger), some medication, stress and cold weather. Once the disease develops, it may resolve on its own or with treatment or may become a persistent chronic condition. The severity and duration of symptoms is variable.
  • Psoriatic arthritis, juvenile form: A type of arthritis associated with psoriasis in children. Psoriasis and arthritis are both inflammatory conditions with one affecting the skin and the other affecting the joints. The arthritis tends to precede the psoriasis.
  • Pyoderma Gangrenosum: A rare inflammatory skin disorder characterized by small red bumps or blisters which eventually become ulcerated.
  • Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne: A very rare autoinflammatory disorder involving the joints and skin. Sufferers develop arthritis, skin lesions and severe acne during adolescence. Usually only one joint is affected during episodes and various joints can be affected - especially the elbows, knees and ankles.
  • Rat-bite fever: An infectious diseases where a bite from a rate transmits a bacterial or fungal infection. The symptoms depend on the infecting organism.
  • Reactive arthritis: The inflammation of a joint
  • Reiterís syndrome: A form of reactive arthritis characterized by arthritis, urethritis, conjunctivitis and skin lesions.
  • Rheumatic conditions: Any condition that affects ones joints
  • Rheumatic fever: An inflammatory disorder that can occur as a complication of untreated streptococcal bacterial infection such as strep throat or scarlet fever. The condition may affect the brain, skin, heart and joints.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: Autoimmune form of arthritis usually in teens or young adults.
  • Rhizomelic pseudopolyarthritis: A rare condition which tends to cause muscle pain and stiffness in the neck, shoulder and hip area.
  • Ross River virus: Mosquito-borne virus in parts of Australia and other countries
  • Rubella: A contagious viral infection caused by the Rubella virus which produces a rash and lymph node swelling. It can have serious implication in pregnant women as the virus can be transmitted through the placenta and cause serious fetal defects or even fetal death.
  • SAPHO syndrome: A rare disorder involving skin (acne, pustulosis), bone (hyperostosis, osteitis) and joint problems.
  • Salmonella food poisoning: Common type of food poisoning.
  • Sarcoidosis: Rare autoimmune disease usually affecting the lungs.
  • Scarlet fever: A complication of infection from strep bacteria such as strep throat.
  • Scheie syndrome:
  • Schnitzler syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of chronic urticaria as well as a blood abnormality called macroglobulinemia.
  • Scleroderma: A rare, progressive connective tissue disorder involving thickening and hardening of the skin and connective tissue. There are a number of forms of scleroderma with some forms being systemic (involving internal organs).
  • Scleroderma, systemic: A rare autoimmune connective tissue disease where the body attacks parts of the body and causes scarring and thickness of the tissue. In the systemic form, the skin and organs are involved.
  • Secondary Biliary Cirrhosis: Secondary biliary cirrhosis is a condition where the bile ducts are unable to transport bile effectively due to a secondary cause which results in blockage, inflammation, scarring or some other damage to the bile ducts. The condition may result from such things as congenital defect of the bile ducts (e.g. biliary atresia), cystic fibrosis, gallstones or a variety of other secondary conditions.
  • Secondary syphilis: A condition which is characterized by fever, multiform skin eruptions, iritis, alopecia, mucous patches and severe pain in the head and joints
  • Senior health conditions: Medical conditions affecting seniors, male or female.
  • Serum sickness: Type of allergic reaction to certain medications or serums
  • Severe combined immunodeficiency, T- B+ due to JAK3 deficiency: A recessively inherited immunodeficiency disorder characterized by a lack of circulating T and Natural Killer Cells and a normal level of B cells. The disorder is caused by a defect on the JAK3 gene. Infants may display symptoms such as pancytopenia, skin rash and abnormal liver function due to a graft-versus-host reaction to the mother's T cells via the placenta. If the condition is not treated, death occurs.
  • Short stature locking fingers: A rare syndrome characterized by short stature and episodes of locked finger joints.
  • Shoulder conditions: Any condition that affects the shoulder
  • Sickle Cell Anemia: Sickle cell anemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by red blood cells which are crescent-shaped rather than the normal doughnut shape. These abnormally shaped red blood cells are unable to function normally and tend to undergo premature destruction which leads to anemia. If the genetic defect which causes the condition is inherited from both parents the condition can be quite severe whereas if it is inherited from only one parent, often there are no symptoms. The abnormally shaped red blood cells can cause problems when they clump together and block blood vessels.
  • Sitosterolemia: A very rare inherited disorder of lipid metabolism where excessive amounts of sterols are absorbed and not removed from the body resulting in a build up in the blood.
  • Sjogren syndrome, secondary: An autoimmune disease where the body's immune system attacks parts of the body that produce moisture such as the eyes, mouth and gastrointestinal tract. Sjogren syndrome can occur on its own (primary) or with another connective tissue disease (secondary) such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus, systemic sclerosis and polymyositis/dermatomyositis. The condition can be mild or severe.
  • Sjogren's Syndrome: Autoimmune disease damaging the eye tear ducts and other glands.
  • Society problems: Difficulty interacting in society.
  • Spinal conditions: Any condition that affects the spine
  • Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia with combined immunodeficiency: A rare syndrome characterized by skeletal abnormalities as well as a poor immune system.
  • Stickler Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by joint problems, distinctive facial characteristics and eye and ear abnormalities.
  • Stickler Syndrome, type I: A rare genetic disorder characterized by joint problems, distinctive facial characteristics and eye and ear abnormalities. Type 1 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 12q13.11-q13.2
  • Stickler Syndrome, type II: A rare genetic disorder characterized by joint problems, distinctive facial characteristics and eye and ear abnormalities. Type 2 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 1p21
  • Stickler Syndrome, type III: A rare genetic disorder characterized by joint problems, distinctive facial characteristics and ear abnormalities. Type 3 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 6q21.3. Type 3 doesn't involve any of the eye problems that occur in type 1 and 2.
  • Stiff joints: Reduced mobility or movement of the joints
  • Streptococcal Infections: Various "strep" bacterial infections.
  • Sweet Syndrome:
  • Synovitis granulomatous with uveitis and cranial neuropathies: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with Hemolytic Anemia, Susceptibility to, 1: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE and hemolytic anemia - the anemia often occurs months or even years before symptoms of SLE develop. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q14.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with Nephritis, Susceptibility to, 1: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE and nephritis. More than half of SLE patients will develop nephritis. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q22.3.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with Vitiligo, Susceptibility to, 1: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE and vitiligo. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 17p13.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 1: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q41.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 10: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 10 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7q32.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 11: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 11 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q32.2-q32.3.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 12: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 12 is linked to a defect on chromosome 8p23.1.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 13: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 13 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p23.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 2: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q37.3.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 3: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 4p16-p15.2.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 4: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 12q24.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 5: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 13q32.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 6: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 16p11.2.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 7: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 7 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20p12.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 8: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 8 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20q13.1.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 9: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 9 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q32.
  • The Hemophilias: A group of hereditary hemorrhagic diathesis due to a deficiency of a blood coagulation factor
  • The clap: A sexually transmitted infection by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae.
  • Tropical Spastic Paraparesis: A form of spastic partial paralysis of the lower limbs which occurs in the tropics
  • Ulcerative colitis: Ulcerative colitis (Colitis ulcerosa, UC) is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Ulcerative colitis is a form of colitis, a disease of the intestine, specifically the large intestine or colon, that includes characteristic ulcers, or open sores, in the colon.
  • Varicose veins: Enlarged blue veins, usually in the legs.
  • Vasculitis hypersensitivity: A condition which is characterised by a reaction that results in the inflammation of the blood vessels
  • Viral Hepatitis: hepatitis describes inflammation of the liver. Hepatitis may be caused by alcohol, drugs, autoimmune diseases, metabolic diseases, and viruses. Viral infection accounts for more than half the cases of acute hepatitis.
  • Weber-Christian disease: A rare skin disorder characterized by recurring inflammation of the fatty layer of the skin and the development of nodules.
  • Wegener's granulomatosis: A rare disease involving blood vessel inflammation which can affect the blood flow to various tissues and organs and hence cause damage. The respiratory system and the kidneys are the main systems affected.
  • West Nile fever: Mosquito-borne infectious virus.
  • Whipple's Disease: Rare malabsorption disease from bacterial digestive infection
  • Wilson's Disease: Wilson disease, or hepatolenticular degeneration, is a neurodegenerative disease of copper metabolism.
  • Winchester Syndrome: A very rare condition involving destruction of bone in the ankle, wrists and elbows as well as eye, teeth and joint abnormalities.
  • Wolcott-Rallison syndrome: A very rare genetic condition characterized primarily by the onset of diabetes mellitus during infancy and epiphyseal dysplasia (abnormal joint development).
  • Wyburn Mason's syndrome: A rare genetic condition mainly involving enlarged brain blood vessels and skin and eye abnormalities.

 

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