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Glossary for Arthritis-like conditions

  • Acute gout: An acute condition which is caused by a disorder of purine or pyrimidine metabolism resulting in inflammatory arthritis
  • Adult onset Still's disease: A form of Still's disease that has a later onset and involves arthralgia or arthritis and a characteristic rash that often appears during periods of temperature increase.
  • Ankle Arthritis: Inflammation of the ankle joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Ankle Osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the ankle joint as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Ankylosing spondylarthritis: Inflammation of one or more spine joints. The spine becomes progressively painful and stiff and the spine joints may eventually fuse and cause disability. The condition may vary from mild to severe. Inflammation can affect other joints and tissues.
  • Antithyroid arthritis syndrome: Arthritis caused by using antithyroid drugs to treat hyperthyroidism.
  • Arthralgia similar to that in rheumatoid arthritis: Pain in the joints similar to that of rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Arthritis: General name for any type of joint inflammation, but often means age-related osteoarthritis.
  • Arthritis -- short stature -- deafness: A very rare syndrome characterized by arthritis, short stature, deafness and numerous other abnormalities.
  • Arthritis pain: Arthritis is inflammation of one or more joints, which results in pain, swelling, stiffness, and limited movement.
  • Arthritis, Gouty: Joint pain and inflammation (arthritis) caused by gout (buildup of urate crystals). The big toe is most commonly affected but other joints may also be affected e.g. foot, ankle, elbow, wrist, knee and fingers. Usually only one joint is affected at a time. The condition is most often seen in older men.
  • Arthritis-related enthesitis: Inflammation of the entheses due to arthritis. The enthuses is the site at which the tendon or ligament attaches to the bone.
  • Arthropathy, Neurogenic: Joint destruction caused by damage to the nervous system which prevents the patient feeling sensations in the joint. Due to the nerve damage, pain and damage to the joint often goes unnoticed as the joint deteriorates even further. The knee and ankle are the most common joints affected. The condition is usually caused by an underlying diseases which affects the nerves e.g. diabetic neuropathy, syringomyelia, spinal cord injury and pernicious anemia.
  • Arthropathy, progressive pseudorheumatoid, of childhood: A form of progressive rheumatoid arthritis that affects children.
  • Arthrosis: A joint
  • Avascular necrosis: Bone death from lack of circulation.
  • Avascular necrosis of femoral head, familial form: A familial hip joint disorder where bone growth abnormalities caused by an interrupted blood supply to the head of the femoral bone results in it's degeneration and deformity. When the body creates a new blood supply, new healthy bone can be formed.
  • Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome: An illness that sometimes occurs in people with gastrointestinal diseases. It is believed to be caused by a build up of bacteria in a pouch in the bowel which triggers the immune system into action.
  • Bursitis: Inflammation of one or more bursae (small sacs) of synovial fluid in the body.
  • Castellani syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by fever, arthritis and enlarged kidney and liver. The fever may fluctuate or come and go. It is most often seen in middle aged males.
  • Chondrocalcinosis 1: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by progressive osteoarthritis which starts relatively early and is progressive. Joint damage is caused by deposits of crystals containing calcium.
  • Chondrocalcinosis 2: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by progressive osteoarthritis. Joint damage is caused by deposits of crystals containing calcium.
  • Chondrocalcinosis familial articular: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by osteoarthritis which starts relatively early and is progressive. Joint damage is caused by deposits of crystals containing calcium.
  • Chronic Joint pain: It is inflammation and infection of one or more joints, which results in pain, swelling, stiffness, and limited movement..
  • Cranio osteoarthropathy: A very rare syndrome characterized by large fontanelles, joint problems and finger clubbing.
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis: A form of degenerative arthritis characterized by calcification on the sides of the spine vertebrae as well as inflammation and calcification of tendons where they attach to bone which often results in bone spurs.
  • Digital arthropathy-brachydactyly, familial: A rare familial disorder characterized by progressive joint disease causing shortening of the end two bones of the fingers and toes. The hands tend to be more affected than the feet.
  • Elbow Arthritis: Inflammation of the elbow joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Elbow Osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the elbow joint as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Finger Arthritis: Inflammation of the finger joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Finger osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the finger joints as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Gout: Painful joints, most commonly the big toe.
  • Granulomatous arthritis of childhood: A rare chronic inflammatory condition that starts during early childhood and is characterized by arthritic joints, uveitis and a skin rash that forms on the trunk and limbs.
  • Hallux limitus: The early stages of toe stiffness due to degenerative arthritis of the base of the big toe. As the condition progresses and the toe becomes totally immobile and the condition is then called hallux rigidus.
  • Hemophilic arthropathy: Joint destruction associated with hemophilia. The knees, ankles, elbows, hip and shoulders are the most common joints involved. Symptoms are progressive and often surgical intervention is required to prevent total loss of joint function.
  • Hip Arthritis: Inflammation of the hip joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Hip dysplasia, Beukes type: A very rare inherited disease characterized by premature degeneration of the hip joints.
  • Hip osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the hip joint as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Infantile multisystem inflammatory disease: A rare autoinflammatory disease characterized by fever, rash, arthritic changes, eye problems and chronic meningitis.
  • Infectious arthritis: A rare condition where arthritis occurs as a result of joint infection by a bacteria, virus or fungus. Symptoms vary according to the infection type.
  • Ischiogluteal Bursitis: Ischiogluteal bursitis refers to damage and inflammation to the bursa (small fluid filled sac) between the hamstring tendon and the pelvic bone. The main symptoms is pain and it can occur from excessive force, repetitive actions or prolonged pressure during activities such as sitting, running, kicking, climbing and jumping.
  • Joint pain: Pain affecting the joints
  • Joint swelling: One or more swollen joints
  • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis: Chronic arthritis affecting children and teens
  • Juvenile gout: Gout that occurs in children as a result of kidney disease caused by a genetic defect.
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A group of chronic inflammatory joint disorders that affects children. The condition generally involves periods of time where the condition is active followed by periods of abatement of symptoms. In some cases, the condition can be systemic and can cause symptoms such as fever and rash with organ involvement. There are three main types of juvenile idiopathic arthritis - oligoarticular, polyarticular and systemic (Still's disease).
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis, unclassified: A chronic inflammatory joint condition affecting children. This particular subtype is defined as unclassified as it doesn't fit into any of the other classifications.
  • Knee arthritis: Inflammation of the knee joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Knee osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the knee joint as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Legg-Calve-Perthes disease: Femur/hip bone disease mostly in children
  • Legg-Calve-Perthes syndrome: A hip joint disorder where bone growth abnormalities caused by an interrupted blood supply to the head of the femoral bone results in it's degeneration and deformity. When the body creates a new blood supply, new healthy bone can be formed.
  • Leukoencephalopathy, arthritis, colitis and hypogammaglobulinemia: A rare syndrome characterized by brain disease, arthritis, colitis and immune system problems.
  • Leukoencephalopathy, arthritis, colitis, and hypogammaglobulinema: A rare condition characterized by the association of arthritis, colitis, low blood gammaglobulin levels and brain anomalies.
  • Multicentric osteolysis -- nodulosis -- arthropathy: A rare syndrome characterized by joint disease, loss of bone mineral density and nodulosis.
  • Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis: A rare condition characterized by the proliferation of histiocytes (immune cells) which causes destructive arthritis and skin nodules.
  • Neck Arthritis: Degenerative arthritic changes in the neck causing pain and loss of function; may be due to age-related degenerative change (osteoarthritis) or due to autoimmune disease (rheumatoid arthritis)
  • Negative rheumatoid factor polyarthritis: A form of rheumatoid arthritis which doesn't involves the presence of rheumatoid factor in the blood. More than one joint is involved.
  • Nodulosis-arthropathy-osteolysis syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by joint disease, loss of bone mineral density and nodulosis.
  • Osteoarthritis: Osteoarthritis is a chronic condition characterised by mechanical disrturbances due to degradation of joints. It is the most common form of arthritis, and the leading cause of chronic disability.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 1: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 21q21-q33 and tends to primarily affect the hip joints.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 2: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2p24-p23 and tends to primarily affect the hand joints.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 3: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 9q21.3-q22 and tends to primarily affect the knee and hip joints.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 4: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q33.3.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 5: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20q11.2 and tends to primarily affect the hip joints.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 6: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 3p24.3 and tends to primarily affect the knee joints.
  • Osteoarthritis, Hip: A common degenerative hip joint disorder that tends to affect older people. The main symptom is pain.
  • Osteoarthropathy of fingers, familial: A rare disorder where a disrupted blood supply to the finger bones which results in bone pain and destruction.
  • Pauciarticular chronic arthritis: A rare condition characterized by chronic arthritis that occurs in several joints.
  • Pediatric granulomatous arthritis: A rare chronic inflammatory condition that starts during early childhood and is characterized by arthritic joints, uveitis and a skin rash that forms on the trunk and limbs.
  • Polyarthritis, rheumatic factor-negative: A form of rheumatoid arthritis which doesn't involves the presence of rheumatoid factor in the blood. More than one joint is involved.
  • Polyarthritis, systemic: A chronic inflammatory disease (usually autoimmune) that causes inflammation in multiple parts of the body and causes arthritis in five or more joints.
  • Polymyalgia rheumatica: A condition characterized by muscle pain and stiffness, fatigue and fever. It is often associated with giant-cell arteritis which is a related but more serious condition.
  • Positive rheumatoid factor polyarthritis: A form of rheumatoid arthritis which involves the presence of rheumatoid factor in the blood. More than one joint is involved.
  • Pseudogout: A condition which is characterized by an acute inflammatory arthropathy caused by calcium pyrophosphate crystals
  • Psoriasis arthropathica: Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic disease characterized by inflammation of the skin (psoriasis) and joints (arthritis). Psoriatic arthritis is said to be a seronegative spondyloarthropathy and therefore occurs more commonly in patients with tissue type HLA-B27 Syndrome in which psoriasis is associated with arthritis, often involving inflammation in terminal interphalangeal joints. A rheumatoid factor is not usually present in the sera of affected individuals.
  • Psoriatic Arthritis: Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic disease characterized by inflammation of the skin (psoriasis) and joints (arthritis). Psoriatic arthritis is said to be a seronegative spondyloarthropathy and therefore occurs more commonly in patients with tissue type HLA-B27.
  • Psoriatic Arthritis, susceptibility to: An inflammatory condition where the defective immune system causes joint inflammation as well as skin cells to grow rapidly causing psoriasis. Not all patients who are susceptible to the condition will develop it. There are various environmental factors which can trigger the onset of the disease e.g. strep throat (common trigger), some medication, stress and cold weather. Once the disease develops, it may resolve on its own or with treatment or may become a persistent chronic condition. The severity and duration of symptoms is variable.
  • Psoriatic arthritis, juvenile form: A type of arthritis associated with psoriasis in children. Psoriasis and arthritis are both inflammatory conditions with one affecting the skin and the other affecting the joints. The arthritis tends to precede the psoriasis.
  • Pyogenic arthritis -- pyoderma gangrenosum -- acne: A very rare autoinflammatory disorder involving the joints and skin. Sufferers develop arthritis, skin lesions and severe acne during adolescence. Usually only one joint is affected during episodes and various joints can be affected - especially the elbows, knees and ankles.
  • Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne: A very rare autoinflammatory disorder involving the joints and skin. Sufferers develop arthritis, skin lesions and severe acne during adolescence. Usually only one joint is affected during episodes and various joints can be affected - especially the elbows, knees and ankles.
  • Reactive arthritis: The inflammation of a joint
  • Reiterís syndrome: A form of reactive arthritis characterized by arthritis, urethritis, conjunctivitis and skin lesions.
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis Associated with Thymus Hyperplasia: An enlarged thymus gland may be associated with rheumatoid arthritis. The thymus gland is located beneath the breastbone and above the windpipe and heart. It is made up of lymphatic tissue and is believed to be responsible for supporting the development of the immune system from the fetal stage through to puberty. After puberty, the thymus gland tends to shrink.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: Autoimmune form of arthritis usually in teens or young adults.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis related fibromyalgia: Rheumatoid arthritis related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory form of arthritis and is an autoimmune disease.
  • Rhizomelic pseudopolyarthritis: A rare condition which tends to cause muscle pain and stiffness in the neck, shoulder and hip area.
  • Sciatica as seen in rheumatoid arthritis: Neuralgia along the course of the sciatic nerve. It can also occur in chronic inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Septic arthritis like stiff back: Pathology in the back which leads to restriction of movement of the back.
  • Seronegative Arthritis: Classification given to the group of joint conditions with similar features to rheumatoid arthritis, but affecting different joints and lacking the specific autoantibodies used to identify rheumatoid arthritis
  • Seronegative spondyloarthropathy: Spondyloarthropathy that is negative to rheumatoid facotr
  • Shoulder Osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the shoulder joint as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Shoulder arthritis: Inflammation of the shoulder joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Shoulder bursitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the bursa of the shoulder
  • Small, unstable nodules as seen in osteoarthritis: In case of osteoarthritis the smaller joints, such as at the fingers, hard bony enlargements, called Heberden's nodes (on the distal interphalangeal joints) and/or Bouchard's nodes (on the proximal interphalangeal joints), may form, and though they are not necessarily painful, they do limit the movement of the fingers significantly.
  • Spinal Arthritis: Inflammation of the spine joints. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Spine osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the spine as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Spondylarthritis: Inflammation of one or more spine joints.
  • Spondylarthropathy: Refers to a family of related inflammatory disorders that affect the sacroiliac joints, the spine and, less commonly, peripheral joints.
  • Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda progressive arthropathy: A rare genetic disorder where abnormal bone development primarily involves the spine and epiphyses (end of long bones where growth occurs). Progressive arthropathy (joint disease) also affects most joints.
  • Spondylosis: Spinal degeneration of the discs or spinal joints
  • Stiff joints: Reduced mobility or movement of the joints
  • Still's Disease, Adult-Onset: A form of arthritic inflammation characterized by fever, rash and joint pain that occurs in adults. The cause is unknown.
  • Subacromial bursitis: Inflammation of a pouch of synovial fluid which is located in the shoulder. It is most often caused by some sort of trauma or overuse of the shoulder. It is difficult to distinguish between subacromial bursitis and rotator cuff injury.
  • Systemic Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis: Onset of JRA with fevers and systemic symptoms
  • Toe Arthritis: Inflammation of the toe joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Toe Osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the toe joints as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Trochanteric bursitis: Inflammation of the trochanteric bursa which is a pouch of synovial fluid which is located in the hip. The inflammation is most often due to overuse and excessive pressure but may also result from injury or rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Wrist Arthritis: Inflammation of the wrist joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Wrist osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the wrist joint as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.

 

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