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Treatments for Asthma

Treatments for Asthma:

Asthma is a chronic disease that is not curable, but with regular medical care and consistent patient compliance with treatments, asthma attacks can successfully be minimized in occurrence, length and severity. The treatment goal for asthma patients is to control symptoms to a degree that allows them to live normal, active lives and to sleep comfortably.

The most effect asthma treatment plans include a multifaceted approach. This includes preventive care, which is vital in minimizing asthma attacks. Because people with asthma often have allergies as well, their lungs can be extremely sensitive to allergens, substances that trigger allergies. In these people, exposure to allergens can result in an exacerbation of asthma symptoms that can become life threatening if not addressed promptly. Prevention includes reducing exposure to specific allergens, such as animal fur and dander, pollen, and dust.

Asthma is also treated with medications. Medications include long-term agents that control and prevent symptoms. Long-term medications must taken daily in a consistent manner to effectively control and prevent symptoms. They generally work by reducing airway inflammation.

One type of long-term medication is inhaled corticosteroids. Corticosteroids can be very effective, although they do have some side effects, such as an increased risk of infection. However, for many patients the benefits of reducing airway inflammation are greater than the risks of side effects.

Other long-term medications can be taken orally or through an inhaler. They work by reducing airway inflammation or helping to open airways and include inhaled long-acting beta2-agonists, leukotriene modifiers, cromolyn, nedocromil, and theophylline.

Medications also include "rescue" or quick-relief medications that treat acute symptoms. Rescue medications are inhaled through a device called an inhaler, and are used on-the-spot when needed when a person feels the sudden onset of asthma symptoms. Rescue medications include short-acting beta2-agonists.

Although people with asthma should carry their rescue medications with them at all times, the medications are not meant to be used frequently or regularly. Generally, if rescue medications are being used more than twice a week, the physician or health care professional should be notified. He or she will evaluate the long-term asthma treatment plan and make adjustments to minimize the need for rescue medication.

Asthma treatment: There is no cure for asthma. With regular medical care and consistent patient compliance with treatments, asthma attacks, also known as exacerbations of asthma, can successfully be minimized in occurrence, length and severity. The treatment goal for asthma patients is to control symptoms to a degree that allows them to live normal active lives and to sleep comfortably. This includes minimizing the use of rescue medications and getting a jump on symptoms before they develop into severe execrations that result in emergency room visits and hospitalizations. To achieve this people with asthma need to be consistently "on top of" their disease and not let preventive care and treatments fall to the wayside when they are feeling good or have not had an exacerbation in a long time. This includes keeping a log or record of asthma symptoms, such as the types of symptoms, when they occurred, what seemed to trigger them, how long they lasted, how severe they were, and what treatment was needed to resolve symptoms.

In conjunction with your professional health care provider, you will develop an individualized treatment plan that best fits your type and severity of asthma and your life style. The most effect treatment plans include a multifaceted approach. This includes preventive care, which is vital in minimizing the symptoms and execrations of asthma. Because people with asthma often have allergies as well, their lungs can be extremely sensitive to allergens, substances that trigger allergies. In these people, exposure to allergens can result in an exacerbation of asthma symptoms that can even become life threatening if not addressed promptly. Prevention includes reducing exposure to allergens, such as animal fur and dander, pollen, and dust.

Asthma is also treated with medications. After a complete evaluation, your health care provider will decide what medication or combination of medications will work best for you. Medications include long-term agents that control and prevent symptoms. Long-term medications must taken daily in a consistent manner to effectively control and prevent symptoms. They generally work by reducing airway inflammation and include inhaled corticosteroids. Corticosteroids can be very effective, although they do have some side effects, such as an increased risk of infection. However, for many patients the benefits of reducing airway inflammation are greater than the risks of side effects. Other long-term, preventative medications can be taken orally or through an inhaler. They work by reducing airway inflammation or helping to open airways and include inhaled long-acting beta2-agonists, leukotriene modifiers, cromolyn, nedocromil, and theophylline.

Other medications include "rescue" or quick-relief medications that treat acute symptoms. Rescue medication are inhaled through a device called an inhaler, and are used on-the-spot when needed when a person feels the sudden onset of asthma symptoms. Rescue medications are generally inhaled short-acting beta2-agonists. Although people with asthma should carry their rescue medications with them at all times, the medications are not meant to be used frequently or regularly. Generally, if rescue medications are being used more than twice a week, your health care professional should be notified so that you can together evaluate your long-term asthma treatment plan and make adjustments to minimize the need for rescue medication.

Treatment List for Asthma

The list of treatments mentioned in various sources for Asthma includes the following list. Always seek professional medical advice about any treatment or change in treatment plans.

  • Hospitalization
  • Anti-inflammatory agents
  • Long-term asthma medications
  • Quick relief asthma treatments
  • Peak flow meter - helps to monitor how well treatment is performing.
  • Exercise - but only under medical supervision.
  • Avoiding triggers or exacerbating factors
    • Avoid cigarette smoke
    • Avoid dust mites
    • Avoid animal dander
    • Avoid cockroaches
    • Avoid vaccuuming - get someone else to do it.
    • Avoid indoor mold
    • Avoid pollen
    • Avoid outdoor mold
    • Avoid fire smoke
    • Avoid animals
    • Avoid strong odors - such as perfumes or cleaning products.
    • Avoid flu - get a flu vaccination and/or avoid people with the flu.
    • Avoid sulfites - in certain foods such as beer, wine, seafood, etc.
    • Avoid cold air
    • Avoid cross-reaction asthma effects of other medications
  • Bronchodilators
  • Cessation of smoking
  • Corticosteroids
  • Salbutamol
  • Terbutaline
  • Salmeterol
  • Iprtropium bromide
  • Oxygen therapy
  • Antibiotics
  • Cephalosporins
  • Penicillin
  • Avoid allergens
  • Mast cell stabilisers
  • Management of asthma, and medications used to prevent and treat symptoms depends on the frequency and severity of symptoms. Treatments for asthma include:
    • Avoidance of triggers - certain medications, pollens, dust etc
    • Avoidance of cigarette smoking - smoking cessation and avoidance of others smoking
    • Utilisation of an asthma action plan and self monitoring
    • Reliever medications for symptomatic relief:
      • Short acting beta2 agonists - salbutamol, terbutaline
      • Ipratropium
      • Oral corticosteroids often used in short courses for moderate to severe exacerbations
    • Preventer drugs:
      • Inhaled corticosteroids - beclomethasone, budesonide, ciclesonide, fluticasone
      • Long acting beta agonists - salmeterol, eformotorol - should always be used in combination with inhaled corticosteroids
      • Cromolyns - cromoglycate and nedocromil - sometimes used in children
      • Leukotriene receptor antagonists - montelukast, zafirlukast - useful for seasonal asthma and may reduce dose of inhaled steroids
      • Controlled release theophylline - sometimes used in severe persistent asthma
    • Severe asthma requires hospitalisation and treatment may include:
      • Continuous high flow oxygen
      • Continuous or frequent nebulised beta agonists
      • Steroids - intravenous and oral
      • Intravenous salbutamol
      • Intravenous adrenaline
      • Intubation and ventilation - used as a last resort for exhaustion related to severe asthma, or respiratory arrest
    • Allergen testing and desensitisation - may have a role in patients with a strong atopic component, but its use is controversial
    • Omalizumab - monoclonal antibody that may have a role in allergic asthma, but more data is required to define its place in asthma management
    • Alternative therapies that some people utilize to alleviate symptoms include: acupuncture, ayruvedic medicine, chiropractic manipulation, massage, hypnosis, exercise, herbal medicines, vitamin supplements, stress reduction and dietary changes
    • Evidence for efficacy of these approaches is variable

Alternative Treatments for Asthma

Alternative treatments or home remedies that have been listed as possibly helpful for Asthma may include:

Asthma: Is the Diagnosis Correct?

The first step in getting correct treatment is to get a correct diagnosis. Differential diagnosis list for Asthma may include:

Asthma: Marketplace Products, Discounts & Offers

Products, offers and promotion categories available for Asthma:

Curable Types of Asthma

Possibly curable types of Asthma may include:

Asthma: Research Doctors & Specialists

Research all specialists including ratings, affiliations, and sanctions.

Drugs and Medications used to treat Asthma:

Note:You must always seek professional medical advice about any prescription drug, OTC drug, medication, treatment or change in treatment plans.

Some of the different medications used in the treatment of Asthma include:

  • Anti-Leukotriene drugs
  • Montelukast
  • Singulair
  • Zafirlukast
  • Accolate
  • Zileuton
  • Zyflo
  • Beclomethasone
  • Apo-Beclomethasone-AQ
  • Beclodisk
  • Becloforte
  • Beclovent
  • Beclovent Rotacaps
  • Beclovent Rotahaler
  • Beconase AQ Nasal Spray
  • Beconase Nasal Inhaler
  • Med-Beclomethasone-AQ
  • Nu-Beclomethasone
  • Propaderm
  • Propaderm-C
  • QVAR
  • Vancenase AQ Nasal Spray
  • Vancenase Nasal Inhaler
  • Vanceril
  • Bitolterol
  • Dexamethasone
  • Aeroseb-Dex
  • Ak-Dex
  • Ak-Trol
  • Baldex
  • Dalalone
  • Dalalone DP
  • Dalalone LA
  • Decaderm
  • Decadron
  • Decadron Nasal Spray
  • Decadron-LA
  • Decadron Phosphate Ophthalmic
  • Decadron Phosphate Respihaler
  • Decadron Phosphate Turbinaire
  • Decadron w/Xylocaine
  • Decadron dose pack
  • Decaject
  • Decaject LA
  • Decaspray
  • Deenar
  • Deone-LA
  • Deronil
  • Dex-4
  • Dexacen-4
  • Dexacen LA-8
  • Dexacidin
  • Dexacort
  • Dexameth
  • Dexasone
  • Dexasone-LA
  • Dexo-LA
  • Dexon
  • Dexone-E
  • Dexone-4
  • Dexone-LA
  • Dexsone
  • Dexsone-E
  • Dexsone-LA
  • Dezone
  • Duo-dezone
  • Gammacorten
  • Hexadrol
  • Maxidex
  • Mymethasone
  • Neodecadron Eye-Ear
  • Neodexair
  • Neomycin-Dex
  • Ocu-Trol
  • Oradexon
  • PMS-Dexamethasone
  • SKDexamethasone
  • Sofracort
  • Solurex
  • Solurex-LA
  • Spersadex
  • Tobradex
  • Turbinaire
  • Fluticasone
  • Advair
  • Advair Diskus
  • Flonase
  • Flovent
  • Flovent Diskus
  • Flovent Rotadisc
  • Formoterol
  • Foradil Aerolizer
  • Methylprednisolone
  • A-Methapred
  • Depmedalone-40
  • Depmedalone-80
  • Depo-Medrol
  • Enpak Refill
  • Mar-Pred 40
  • Medrol
  • Medrol Acne Lotion
  • Medrol Enpak
  • Medrol Veriderm Cream
  • Meprolone
  • Neo-Medrol Acne Lotion
  • Neo-Medrol Veriderm
  • Rep-Pred 80
  • Solu-Medrol
  • Nedocromil
  • Alocril
  • Tilade
  • Tilade Nebulizer Solution
  • Apo-Oxtriphylline
  • Choledyl
  • Choledyl Delayed-Release
  • Choledyl SA
  • Novotriphyl
  • Prednisolone
  • A&D w/Prednisolone
  • Cortalone
  • Delta-Cortef
  • Duapred
  • Fernisonone-P
  • Hydelta-TBA
  • Hydeltrasol
  • Inflamase
  • Inflamase Forte
  • Key-Pred
  • Meticortelone
  • Meti-Derm
  • Metreton
  • Minims Prednisolone
  • Mydrapred
  • Niscort
  • Nor-Pred
  • Nova-Pred
  • Novoprednisolone
  • Optimyd
  • Otobione
  • Peidaject
  • Pediapred
  • Polypred
  • Predcor
  • Pred Forte
  • Pred-G
  • Pred Mild
  • Prelone
  • PSP-IV
  • Savacort
  • Sterane
  • TBA Pred
  • Prednisone
  • Apo-Prednisone
  • Aspred-C
  • Deltasone
  • Liquid Pred
  • Meticorten
  • Novoprednisone
  • Orasone
  • Panasol-S
  • Paracort
  • Prednicen-M
  • Prednisone Intensol
  • SK-Prednisone
  • Sterapred
  • Sterapred-DS
  • Winpred
  • AccuNeb
  • Proventil
  • Ventolin
  • Ventolin HFA
  • Volmax
  • VoSpire ER
  • Airomir
  • Alti-Salbutamol
  • Apo-Salvent
  • Gen-Salbutamol
  • PMS-Salbutamol
  • Ratio-Inspra-Sal
  • Ratio-Salbutamol
  • Rhoxal-salbutamol
  • Salbu-2
  • Salbu-4
  • Ventolin Diskus
  • Salbulin Autohaler
  • Aminophylline
  • Drafilyn
  • Phyllocontin
  • Phyllocontin-350
  • Rivanase AQ
  • Vanceril AEM
  • Aerobec
  • Beconase Aqua
  • Becotide 100
  • Becotide 250
  • Becotide Aerosol
  • Budesonide
  • Pulmicort Respules
  • Pulmicort Turbuhaler
  • Pulmicort
  • Aerosial
  • Budesonide and Formoterol
  • Symbicort
  • Dyphylline
  • Dilor
  • Lufyllin
  • Fenoterol
  • Berotec
  • Partusisten
  • Oxeze Turbuhaler
  • Foradil
  • Oxis
  • Pirbuterol
  • Maxair Autohaler
  • Cortate
  • Cortisone Acetate
  • Eformoterol
  • Foradile

Unlabeled Drugs and Medications to treat Asthma:

Unlabelled alternative drug treatments for Asthma include:

  • Cyclosporine - mainly used for severe, steroid-dependent asthma
  • Neoral - mainly used for severe, steroid-dependent asthma
  • Sandimmune - mainly used for severe, steroid-dependent asthma
  • SangCya - mainly used for severe, steroid-dependent asthma
  • Ipratropium
  • Atrovent
  • Alti-Atrovent
  • Apo-Atrovent
  • Atrovent Nasal Spray
  • Combivent
  • Dom-Ipratropium
  • Ipratropium Novaplus
  • PMS-Ipratropium
  • Methotrexate
  • Abitrexate
  • Folex
  • Folex PFS
  • Mexate
  • Mexate AQ
  • Rheumatrex Dose Pack
  • Trexall
  • Omeprazole
  • Losec
  • Prilosec
  • Risek

Latest treatments for Asthma:

The following are some of the latest treatments for Asthma:

Hospital statistics for Asthma:

These medical statistics relate to hospitals, hospitalization and Asthma:

  • 500,000 hospitalizations annually in the US (Mayo Clinic)
  • 1.5 million ED visits in 1995 (NHLBI)
  • 201 males per 100,000 population are hospitalised with asthma in Australia 2001-2002 (Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • 217 females per 100,000 population are hospitalised with asthma in Australia 2001-2002 (Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • 0.49% (62,273) of hospital consultant episodes were for asthma in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • more hospital information...»

Hospitals & Medical Clinics: Asthma

Research quality ratings and patient incidents/safety measures for hospitals and medical facilities in specialties related to Asthma:

Hospital & Clinic quality ratings »

Choosing the Best Treatment Hospital: More general information, not necessarily in relation to Asthma, on hospital and medical facility performance and surgical care quality:

Medical news summaries about treatments for Asthma:

The following medical news items are relevant to treatment of Asthma:

Discussion of treatments for Asthma:

Asthma A Concern for Minority Populations, NIAID Fact Sheet: NIAID (Excerpt)

Once asthma sufferers learn what conditions prompt their attacks, they can take steps to attempt to control their environment and avoid these triggers. Medical treatment with anti-inflammatory agents (especially inhaled steroids) and bronchodilators, however, is usually necessary to prevent and control attacks. With optimal management, people usually can control their asthma. People living in inner cities, however, cannot always get optimal care. Even currently available treatments do not control severe asthma in some patients, such as children in inner cities. (Source: excerpt from Asthma A Concern for Minority Populations, NIAID Fact Sheet: NIAID)

Facts About Asthma: CDC-OC (Excerpt)

Environmental interventions, in combination with medical management, can significantly reduce the burden of asthma. (Source: excerpt from Facts About Asthma: CDC-OC)

Facts About Asthma: CDC-OC (Excerpt)

Managing asthma requires a long-term, multifaceted approach, including patient education, behavior changes, avoidance of asthma triggers, pharmacologic therapy, and frequent medical follow-up. (Source: excerpt from Facts About Asthma: CDC-OC)

NHLBI -- Your Asthma Can Be Controlled: NHLBI (Excerpt)

Each of these features of asthma can be prevented or treated by:

  • Staying away from your triggers or controlling them

  • Taking medicine that opens your airways

  • Getting treatment for the inflammation

Treating inflammation is very important in the control of moderate to severe asthma. This may mean the daily use of such medicines as cromolyn sodium or inhaled steroids. Both of these medicines are safe to take. (Source: excerpt from NHLBI -- Your Asthma Can Be Controlled: NHLBI)

NHLBI, Asthma & Physical Activity in the School: NHLBI (Excerpt)

A peak flow meter is a small device that measures how well air moves out of the airways. Monitoring peak flow helps a student determine changes in his or her asthma and identify appropriate actions to take.

Each student has his or her personal best peak flow reading. This number should be noted in the student's asthma plan or school health file. A peak flow reading less than 80 percent of the student's personal best indicates the need for action. A student should avoid running and playing until the peak flow reading returns or exceeds 80 percent of the personal best.

A peak flow reading is only one indicator of asthma problems. Symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, and chest tightness are also indicators of worsening asthma. Follow the student's individual plan or the school plan if you observe any of the signs or symptoms listed in the asthma emergency section or in the student's own plan. (Source: excerpt from NHLBI, Asthma & Physical Activity in the School: NHLBI)

NHLBI, Asthma & Physical Activity in the School: NHLBI (Excerpt)

How to Use a Metered Dose Inhaler

  1. Take off the cap. Shake the inhaler.

  2. Stand up. Breathe out.

  3. Use the inhaler in any one of these ways:

    A. Open Mouth: Hold inhaler 1 to 2 inches in front of your mouth (about the width of two fingers).
    B. Spacer: Use a spacer/ holding chamber. These come in many shapes and can be useful to any patient.
    C. In the Mouth: Put the inhaler in your mouth. Do not use for steroids.
(Source: excerpt from NHLBI, Asthma & Physical Activity in the School: NHLBI)

NHLBI, Asthma Age Page: NHLBI (Excerpt)

Asthma in older adults presents some special concerns. For example, the normal effects of aging can make asthma harder to diagnose and treat. So can other health problems that many older adults have (like emphysema or heart disease). Also, older adults are more likely than younger people to have side effects from asthma medicines. (For example, recent studies show that older adults who take high doses of inhaled steroid medicines over a long time may increase their chance of getting glaucoma.) When some asthma and nonasthma medicines are taken by the same person, the drugs can combine to produce harmful side effects. Doctors and patients must take special care to watch out for and address these concerns through a complete diagnosis and regular checkups. (Source: excerpt from NHLBI, Asthma Age Page: NHLBI)

ASTHMA: NWHIC (Excerpt)

Medication and trigger avoidance are two strategies most commonly used to control asthma. Developing medication and avoidance plans with your doctor and sticking to them are important to controlling asthma and preventing attacks.

Mild asthma may be treated with fast-acting, inhaled bronchodialators, which help open up airways to allow air to move more freely. During an acute attack, bronchodialators are used to decrease the immediate symptoms. More severe asthma may be treated with a combination of bronchodialators and anti-inflammatory medications, which help reduce the swelling of airways.

Allergen avoidance is often an effective strategy for people who have asthma strongly triggered by allergies and may reduce the amount of medication necessary to control the asthma. Anti-allergy medication and allergy desensitization shots are also options. (Source: excerpt from ASTHMA: NWHIC)

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