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Causes of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Causes: Risk Factors

The following conditions have been cited in various sources as potentially causal risk factors related to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder:

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Causes: Male-Female Gender Ratio

Gender of Patients for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Boys 2-3 times more than girls....more »

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Related Medical Conditions

To research the causes of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, consider researching the causes of these these diseases that may be similar, or associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder:

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Causes and Types

Causes of Types of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Review the cause informationfor the various types of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder:

  • Predominantly inattentive ADHD subtype (type of ADD)
  • Predominantly hyperactive-impulsive ADHD subtype (type of ADD)
  • Combined inattentive-hyperactive ADHD subtype (type of ADD)
  • more types...»

Causes of Broader Categories of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Review the causal information about the various more general categories of medical conditions:

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder as a symptom:

Conditions listing Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder as a symptom may also be potential underlying causes of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Our database lists the following as having Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder as a symptom of that condition:

Medications or substances causing Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder:

The following drugs, medications, substances or toxins are some of the possible causes of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder as a symptom. This list is incomplete and various other drugs or substances may cause your symptoms. Always advise your doctor of any medications or treatments you are using, including prescription, over-the-counter, supplements, herbal or alternative treatments.


What causes Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder?

Article excerpts about the causes of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder:

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: NIMH (Excerpt)

Health professionals stress that since no one knows what causes ADHD, it doesn't help parents to look backward to search for possible reasons. There are too many possibilities to pin down the cause with certainty. It is far more important for the family to move forward in finding ways to get the right help.

Scientists, however, do need to study causes in an effort to identify better ways to treat, and perhaps some day, prevent ADHD. They are finding more and more evidence that ADHD does not stem from home environment, but from biological causes. When you think about it, there is no clear relationship between home life and ADHD. Not all children from unstable or dysfunctional homes have ADHD. And not all children with ADHD come from dysfunctional families. Knowing this can remove a huge burden of guilt from parents who might blame themselves for their child's behavior.

Over the last decades, scientists have come up with possible theories about what causes ADHD. Some of these theories have led to dead ends, some to exciting new avenues of investigation.

One disappointing theory was that all attention disorders and learning disabilities were caused by minor head injuries or undetectable damage to the brain, perhaps from early infection or complications at birth. Based on this theory, for many years both disorders were called "minimal brain damage" or "minimal brain dysfunction." Although certain types of head injury can explain some cases of attention disorder, the theory was rejected because it could explain only a very small number of cases. Not everyone with ADHD or LD has a history of head trauma or birth complications.

Another theory was that refined sugar and food additives make children hyperactive and inattentive. As a result, parents were encouraged to stop serving children foods containing artificial flavorings, preservatives, and sugars. However, this theory, too, came under question. In 1982, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Federal agency responsible for biomedical research, held a major scientific conference to discuss the issue. After studying the data, the scientists concluded that the restricted diet only seemed to help about 5 percent of children with ADHD, mostly either young children or children with food allergies. (Source: excerpt from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: NIMH)

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: NIMH (Excerpt)

Drugs such as cocaine--including the smokable form known as crack--seem to affect the normal development of brain receptors. These brain cell parts help to transmit incoming signals from our skin, eyes, and ears, and help control our responses to the environment. Current research suggests that drug abuse may harm these receptors. Some scientists believe that such damage may lead to ADHD.

Toxins in the environment may also disrupt brain development or brain processes, which may lead to ADHD. Lead is one such possible toxin. It is found in dust, soil, and flaking paint in areas where leaded gasoline and paint were once used. It is also present in some water pipes. Some animal studies suggest that children exposed to lead may develop symptoms associated with ADHD, but only a few cases have actually been found. (Source: excerpt from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: NIMH)

Medical news summaries relating to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder:

The following medical news items are relevant to causes of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder:

Related information on causes of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder:

As with all medical conditions, there may be many causal factors. Further relevant information on causes of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder may be found in:

 

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