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Cure Research for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Latest Treatments for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Some of the more recent treatments for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder include:

Treatments for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Treatments to consider for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder may include:

Cure Research discussion for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder:

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): NWHIC (Excerpt)

Research on brain imaging has shown that the brains of children with ADHD differ from those of children without the disorder. Several brain regions and structures in children with ADHD tend to be smaller. Overall brain size is generally 5% smaller in affected children than in children without ADHD. While this average difference is seen over and over, it is too small to be used alone in making the diagnosis of ADHD in a particular person. Also, there appears to be a link between a person's ability to pay continued attention and the amount of their brain activity. In people with ADHD, the brain areas that control attention show to be less active. This suggests that lower levels of activity in some parts of the brain may be related to problems in sustaining attention. (Source: excerpt from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): NWHIC)

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): NWHIC (Excerpt)

The MTA study results show that long-term combination treatment (intensive behavioral intervention combined with medication) or medication management alone are more successful in reducing ADHD symptoms than intensive behavioral treatments alone or routine community treatments alone. The study also shows that combination treatment is better for other problem areas of functioning (such as anxiety, academic performance, parent-child relations, and social skills) than routine community care-only, medication-only, and behavioral treatment-only approaches. (Source: excerpt from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): NWHIC)

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): NWHIC (Excerpt)

One theory suggests that ADHD is related to problems in controlling responses to internal and external stimuli. Evidence suggests that the areas of the brain involved in planning, foresight, considering consequences, and inhibiting actions, are underaroused in persons with ADHD. Stimulant medication may work on these same areas of the brain to increase brain activity to more normal levels, allowing the patient to focus better. More research is needed, however, to firmly establish how these stimulants work. (Source: excerpt from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): NWHIC)

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: NIMH (Excerpt)

For example, the use of new techniques like brain imaging to observe how the brain actually works is already providing new insights into the causes of ADHD. Other research is seeking to identify conditions of pregnancy and early childhood that may cause or contribute to these differences in the brain. As the body of knowledge grows, scientists may someday learn how to prevent these differences or at least how to treat them. (Source: excerpt from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: NIMH)

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: NIMH (Excerpt)

NIMH and the U.S. Department of Education are cosponsoring a large national study--the first of its kind--to see which combinations of ADHD treatment work best for different types of children. During this 5-year study, scientists at research clinics across the country will work together in gathering data to answer such questions as: Is combining stimulant medication with behavior modification more effective than either alone? Do boys and girls respond differently to treatment? How do family stresses, income, and environment affect the severity of ADHD and long-term outcomes? How does needing medicine affect children's sense of competence, self-control, and self-esteem? As a result of such research, doctors and mental health specialists may someday know who benefits most from different types of treatment and be able to intervene more effectively. (Source: excerpt from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: NIMH)

Medical research for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: medical news summaries:

The following medical news items are relevant to medical research for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder:

Evidence Based Medicine Research for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Medical research papers related to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder include:

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