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Types of Autonomic neuropathy

Autonomic neuropathy: Types list

The list of types of Autonomic neuropathy mentioned in various sources includes:

Types discussion:

Diabetic Neuropathy The Nerve Damage of Diabetes: NIDDK (Excerpt)

Autonomic neuropathy is another form of diffuse neuropathy. It affects the nerves that serve the heart and internal organs and produces changes in many processes and systems.

Urination and sexual response
Autonomic neuropathy most often affects the organs that control urination and sexual function. Nerve damage can prevent the bladder from emptying completely, so bacteria grow more easily in the urinary tract (bladder and kidneys). When the nerves of the bladder are damaged, a person may have difficulty knowing when the bladder is full or controlling it, resulting in urinary incontinence.

The nerve damage and circulatory problems of diabetes can also lead to a gradual loss of sexual response in both men and women, although sex drive is unchanged. A man may be unable to have erections or may reach sexual climax without ejaculating normally.

Digestion
Autonomic neuropathy can affect digestion. Nerve damage can cause the stomach to empty too slowly, a disorder called gastric stasis. When the condition is severe (gastroparesis), a person can have persistent nausea and vomiting, bloating, and loss of appetite. Blood glucose levels tend to fluctuate greatly with this condition.

If nerves in the esophagus are involved, swallowing may be difficult. Nerve damage to the bowels can cause constipation or frequent diarrhea, especially at night. Problems with the digestive system often lead to weight loss.

Cardiovascular system
Autonomic neuropathy can affect the cardiovascular system, which controls the circulation of blood throughout the body. Damage to this system interferes with the nerve impulses from various parts of the body that signal the need for blood and regulate blood pressure and heart rate. As a result, blood pressure may drop sharply after sitting or standing, causing a person to feel dizzy or light-headed, or even to faint (orthostatic hypotension).

Neuropathy that affects the cardiovascular system may also affect the perception of pain from heart disease. People may not experience angina as a warning sign of heart disease or may suffer painless heart attacks. It may also raise the risk of a heart attack during general anesthesia.

Hypoglycemia
Autonomic neuropathy can hinder the body's normal response to low blood sugar or hypoglycemia, which makes it difficult to recognize and treat an insulin reaction.

Sweating
Autonomic neuropathy can affect the nerves that control sweating. Sometimes, nerve damage interferes with the activity of the sweat glands, making it difficult for the body to regulate its temperature. Other times, the result can be profuse sweating at night or while eating (gustatory sweating). (Source: excerpt from Diabetic Neuropathy The Nerve Damage of Diabetes: NIDDK)

Keep your nervous system healthy: NIDDK (Excerpt)

Autonomic nerves go to the penis. Damage to these nerves can prevent a man's penis from getting firm when he wants to have sex. This condition is called impotence (IM-po-tents). Many men who have had diabetes for many years experience impotence. (Source: excerpt from Keep your nervous system healthy: NIDDK)

Keep your nervous system healthy: NIDDK (Excerpt)

Autonomic nerves go to the vagina. Damage to these nerves prevents a woman's vagina from getting wet when she wants to have sex. A woman might also have less feeling around her vagina. (Source: excerpt from Keep your nervous system healthy: NIDDK)

Keep your nervous system healthy: NIDDK (Excerpt)

Autonomic nerves go to the heart. Damage to these nerves might make your heart beat faster or at different speeds. (Source: excerpt from Keep your nervous system healthy: NIDDK)

Keep your nervous system healthy: NIDDK (Excerpt)

Autonomic nerves go to the bladder. Damage to these nerves can make it hard to know when you should go to the bathroom. The damage can also make it hard to feel when your bladder is empty. Both problems can cause you to hold urine for too long, which can lead to bladder infections. Another problem can be leaking drops of urine accidentally. (Source: excerpt from Keep your nervous system healthy: NIDDK)

Keep your nervous system healthy: NIDDK (Excerpt)

Autonomic nerves go to the blood vessels that keep your blood pressure steady. Damage to these nerves makes your blood move too slowly to keep your blood pressure steady when you change position. When you go from lying down to standing up or when you exercise a lot, the sudden changes in blood pressure can make you dizzy. (Source: excerpt from Keep your nervous system healthy: NIDDK)

Autonomic neuropathy: Rare Types

Rare types of medical conditions and diseases in related medical categories:

Autonomic neuropathy: Related Disease Topics

More general medical disease topics related to Autonomic neuropathy include:

Research More About Autonomic neuropathy

 

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