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Diseases » Bacterial diseases » Glossary
 

Glossary for Bacterial diseases

  • Acanthamoeba: Several conditions from infection with ameba.
  • Acne: Pimples and blackheads on the face and skin.
  • Actinomycetales infection: A bacterial infection from the order of Actinobacteria. The range of symptoms is variable depending on which bacteria from the order is involved.
  • Actinomycosis: An infection that results from the bacteria sp. Actinomyces.
  • Actinomycotic appendicitis: Chronic suppurative appendicitis resulting from infection by Actinomyces israelii. . It is extremely rare, but it is important to diagnose it, since failure to treat it adequately may result in protracted illness with extensive local spread.
  • Acute Appendicitis: Infection of the appendix
  • Acute Tracheitis: Tracheitis is a bacterial infection of the trachea and is capable of producing airway obstruction
  • Acute bacterial prostatitis: Bacterial prostatitis is a bacterial inflammation of the prostate gland, in men.
  • Acute rheumatic fever: Bacterial joint infection with risk of heart complications.
  • African tick typhus: An infectious disease caused by a rikettsial bacteria and transmitted by ticks.
  • Agammaglobulinemias, Primary: A group of inherited conditions characterized by a defective immune system.
  • Agranulocytosis: Total lack of granulocytes in the blood
  • Amebic dysentery: Ameba-caused bacterial bowel infection and ulceration.
  • Anthrax: A serious infectious bacterial disease that can be fatal.
  • Anthrax meningitis: Anthrax meningitis is an infectious disease caused by breathing in the spores of the bacteria Bacillus anthracis.
  • Arcobacter butzleri infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Arcobacter genus. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms but may also cause blood infections. The bacteria tends to originate in pigs, cattle, sheep and water.
  • Arcobacter cryaerophilus infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Arcobacter genus. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms but may also cause blood infections. The bacteria tends to originate in pigs, cattle, sheep and water.
  • Arcobacter infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Arcobacter genus. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms but may also cause blood infections. The bacteria tends to originate in pigs, cattle, sheep and water.
  • Ausrian triad: The association of pneumococcal pneumonia, meningitis and endocarditis.
  • Austrian syndrome: A condition where alcoholism is associated with heart failure and pneumococcal meningitis.
  • Bacillaceae Infections: Infection with bacteria from the Bacillaceae family. Bacillaceae infection can cause a variety of diseases depending on the specific bacteria involved e.g. anthrax, tetanus, botulism.
  • Bacillus cereus type I food poisoning: Bacillus cereus is a bacterium that can cause food poisoning symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. There are two types: Type I causes mainly vomiting and is associated with fried rice whereas type II causes mainly diarrhea and is associated with meats, cereals, vegetables and milk.
  • Bacillus cereus type II food poisoning: Bacillus cereus is a bacterium that can cause food poisoning symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. There are two types: Type I causes mainly vomiting and is associated with fried rice whereas type II causes mainly diarrhea and is associated with meats, cereals, vegetables and milk.
  • Bacteremia: A condition where there is the presence of bacteria in the blood
  • Bacterial appendicitis: Appendicitis is inflammation of the inner lining of the vermiform appendix that spreads to its other parts. Appendicitis may occur for several reasons, such as an infection of the appendix, but the most important step is the obstruction of the appendiceal lumen.
  • Bacterial conjunctivitis: Infection and inflammation of the conjunctiva caused by bacteria.
  • Bacterial digestive infections: Bacterial infections affecting the gastrointestinal
  • Bacterial endocarditis: Infection and inflammation of the inner layers of the heart, most commonly the valves cause by bacteria.
  • Bacterial meningitis: Bacterial meningitis is a form of meningitis caused by bacteria that normally lives in the mouth and throat. When the immune system is unable to supress this bacteria, it travels to the cerebrospinal spinal fluid in the brain. From there it affects the membranes surrounding the brain.
  • Bacterial pericarditis: Inflammation and swelling of the pericardium (fibrous sac surrounding the heart) due to a bacterial infection. It can occur as a complication of a bacterial infection in some other part of the body. It is most often a complication of a respiratory infection but skin and oral infections may also be a cause. Bacterial pericarditis may also occur after heart surgery. It occurs predominantly in males aged 20 to 50 years. The condition may be misdiagnosed as a heart attack and vice versa.
  • Bacterial prostatitis: Bacterial prostatitis is a bacterial inflammation of the prostate gland, in men.
  • Bacterial septicemia: Sepsis of the bloodstream caused by bacteraemia.
  • Bacterial toxic-shock syndrome: A very rare, potentially fatal infection caused by toxins produced by bacteria, especially bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. The condition is often associated with tampon use but can originate from other sources.
  • Bacterial toxins -- fetal exposure: Experimental studies on mice indicate that the use of Bacterial toxins during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • Bacterial vaginosis: Bacterial vaginal infection
  • Bacteriuria: Presence of bacteria in the urine as a result of a bacterial infection in the urinary tract. A small amount of bacteria may produce no symptoms. Large amounts of bacteria usually indicate a urinary tract infection.
  • Bar's syndrome: A rare type of bacterial infection that tends to occur in pregnant women. It manifests as pain in the gallbladder, ureter or appendix area as well as fever and bacteria in the urine.
  • Barber's rash: Skin infection in facial hair areas
  • Bartholin's abscess: Abscess in a small vaginal gland
  • Bartonella: A class of bacteria that can infect humans at a range of different sites. The most well known is Cat Scratch Disease, caused by B.henselae.
  • Bartonella infections: Infection with bacteria from the Bartonella genus of bacteria. Specific bacteria from within this group are Bartonella bacilliforms (Oroya fever), Bartonella Heneslae (Cat-scratch disease). Other conditions caused by this bacteria are endocarditis, bacteremia and angiomatosis. Symptoms vary depending on the type of bacteria involved and the severity of the infection - immunocompromised patients face greater risk of severe infection.
  • Bartonellosis: An infectious disease caused by Bartonella bacilliforms and transmitted by sandflies. It causes fever, anemia and a skin rash.
  • Bartonellosis due to Bartonella quintana infection: A disease caused by infection with Bartonella quintana which are transmitted by the body louse. It causes trench fever but may also result in septicemia and endocarditis in patients with a weakened immune system.
  • Bejel: An infectious disease caused by Treponema pallidum which is similar to the organism that causes syphilis but is not sexually transmitted.
  • Boil: Infected puseous hair follicle on the skin
  • Borreliosis: An infectious bacterial disorder that is transmitted by ticks and causes skin rashes joint swelling and other symptoms similar to the flu.
  • Bortonneuse fever: A mild infectious disease caused by the bacterium Rickettsia Conorrii. The disease is transmitted by a dog tick (Riphicephalus sanguineus) and is most common in countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. Incubation usually takes about one week.
  • Botulism food poisoning: Extremely dangerous food poisoning requiring medical attention, but not always recognized because of its non-abdominal symptoms.
  • Boutonneuse fever: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Brill disease: A form of recurring typhus caused by a bacterium called Rickettsia prowazekii and transmitted by lice. The illness may occur years after the initial sickness and tends to be not as severe.
  • Brill-Zinsser disease: A form of recurring typhus caused by a bacterium called Rickettsia proazekii and transmitted by lice. The illness may occur after the initial sickness and tends to be not as severe.
  • Brucellosis: An infectious disease caused by the Brucella genus which is transmitted from animals to humans.
  • Bruch's disease: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Bubonic plague: Severe flea-borne bacterial disease
  • Burkholderia pseudomallei: Gram negative, aerobic, motile rod shaped bacterium.
  • Campylobacter fetus infection: Campylobacter fetus is a food borne bacterial infection which may vary in severity from mild to severe. The bacteria are opportunistic and mainly affect debilitated patients but can also occur in healthy patients. Abortion due to blood infection in the fetus can occur in pregnant women who become infected. The infection is less likely to cause gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea than other Campylobacter infections but is prone to causing infection in other parts of the body such as the appendix, abdominal cavity, central nervous system (meningitis), gallbladder, urinary tract and blood stream. Cattle and sheep are the main source of this bacteria.
  • Campylobacter food poisoning: Common bacterial infection usually from chicken.
  • Campylobacter hylointestinalis infection: Campylobacter hyloinstesinalis is a food borne bacterial infection which may cause mild to severe gastroenteritis. Cattle, pigs, hamsters and deer are the main source of this bacteria.
  • Campylobacter jejuni: Rod shaped bacteria causing diarrhea.
  • Campylobacter jejuni infection: Campylobacter jejuni infection is a common food borne bacterial infection which may vary in severity from mild to severe. Death can occur in severe cases but tends to occur in patients with other existing illnesses such as HIV, cancer or liver disease. The infection can in rare cause infection in other parts of the body such as the appendix, abdominal cavity, central nervous system (meningitis), gallbladder, urinary tract and blood stream. Undercooked chicken is the main source of infection.
  • Campylobacter jejuni subspecies doylei infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Campylobacter family. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Campylobacter laridis infection: Campylobacter laridis is a food borne bacterial infection which may cause mild to severe gastroenteritis in healthy individuals and blood infection in immunocompromised patients.
  • Campylobacter sputorum infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Campylobacter family. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Capnocytophaga: A bacterial infection caused by Capnocytophaga canimorsus which is often found in normal healthy cats and dogs. The infections tends to occur mainly in immunocompromised patients, alcoholics or patients who have chronic respiratory disease or have had their spleen removed. The eyes are particularly sensitive to this infection. The incubation period can be as long as eight days.
  • Carbuncle: Group of multiple boils
  • Cellulitis: Inflammation of skin or subcutaneous tissues.
  • Cephalic tetanus: Rare severe form of tetanus of the brain and head.
  • Chancroid: An sexually transmitted disease caused by the Haemophilus ducreyi bacteria and is characterized by painful genital ulceration.
  • Cheese Washer's lung -- Penicillium spp.: Inhalation of cheese particles contaminated with bacteria (Penicillium spp.) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the bacteria in the airborne cheese particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chlamydia: Common sexually transmitted disease often without symptoms.
  • Chlamydia pneumoniae: Specific bacterial type of pneumonia
  • Chlamydial Infection: Infection from Chlamydia genus.
  • Cholera: An acute bacterial disease transmitted through food or water contaminated with human faeces. The intestinal infection is caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae.
  • Chronic Granulomatous Disease: A very rare inherited blood disorder where certain cells involved with immunity (phagocytes) are unable to destroy bacteria and hence the patient suffers repeated bacterial infections.
  • Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia: A rare form of leukemia characterized by excessive levels of mature neutrophils.
  • Chronic bacterial prostatitis: Chronic bacterial prostatitis is a condition in which infection of the prostate and the related symptoms develop more slowly.. The infection is normally just in the prostate, and there is no other infection such as a bladder infection. Symptoms are not as dramatic as with an acute infection. The symptoms may 'drag on', or come and go.
  • Clostridium perfringens food poisoning: Common type of food poisoning.
  • Clostridium sordellii: Clostridium sordellii is a rare bacterium that can cause infections such as pneumonia, arthritis, peritonitis and endocarditis. It is most often associated with childbirth, trauma, medically induced abortions, injection drug use and routine gynecological procedures. Death is not uncommon with this type of infection. In rare cases it can cause toxic shock syndrome.
  • Colibacillosis: Infection with a bacteria called Escherichia coli. Infection can cause severe diarrhea or septicemia. The bacteria can also produce toxins which can affect other parts of the body also. Infections can occur anywhere in the world but some developing countries have endemic areas. Transmission can occur contaminated animal products or contact with infected cats and dogs.
  • Conditions involving a pathogen: Medical conditions involving some type of pathogen, such as a virus or bacteria.
  • Congenital syphilis: Syphilis inherited from mother during pregnancy.
  • Congenital tuberculosis: Fetal infection with tuberculosis
  • Conor's disease: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Constrictive tuberculous pericarditis: Inflammation and swelling of the pericardium (fibrous sac surrounding the heart) that occurs as a complication of tuberculosis. The condition may be misdiagnosed as a heart attack and vice versa.
  • Cryptococcal Meningitis: Cryptococcal meningitis is an infection of the meninges (the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord), caused by the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans.
  • Cryptococcosis: A fungal infection caused by Cryptococcus neoformans which primarily affects the central nervous system and the lungs. People with weakened immune systems such as AIDS sufferers are generally more susceptible to this type of infection.
  • Cryptosporiosis: Contagious parasitic digestive infection
  • Cutaneous Anthrax: A skin infection caused by the spores of the anthrax bacteria called Bacillus anthracis. The infection occurs when the spores enter broken skin and result in a small red bump which blisters. The blister ruptures and forms a dark scab over dead tissue.
  • Cutaneous diphtheria: Skin infection from Diphtheria
  • Dermatophilosis: A form of bacterial skin infection caused by Dermatophilus congolensis. Infection usually occurs in animals such as cattle and sheep but can cause skin lesions in humans.
  • Diaphoresis: Excessive sweating.
  • Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli: Various E-coli bacteria that can cause diarrhea
  • Diphtheria: Infectious bacterial respiratory disease
  • Disseminated Vaccinia: Disseminated vaccinia is a serious complication of smallpox vaccination. The condition involves progressive death of tissue (necrosis) at the site of the vaccination. The condition is relatively rare but can result in death so prompt diagnosis and treatment is essential. People with AIDS, immunodeficiencies, cancer, receiving immunosuppressive therapies or have some other form of immune system defect are particularly susceptible to this complication.
  • Disseminated infection with mycobacterium avium complex: Mycobacterium avium complex is an opportunistic bacterium which tends to occur mainly in patients with advanced AIDS. The infection can spread throughout the body and result in such things as blood infections.
  • Drug-resistant Streptococcus Pneumoniae Disease: Streptococcal respiratory infection resistant to antibiotics
  • Drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae: A form of streptococcus pneumoniae which is resistant to antibacterials that are usually used to destroy it
  • Durand-Nicolas-Favre syndrome: Infection by Chlamydia trachomatosis which can be contracted through sexual intercourse or through contact with contaminated material.
  • Dysentery: A general term for various bacterial digestive disorders.
  • E-coli food poisoning: Type of bacterial food poisoning
  • Edwardsiella tarda infection: A type of bacterial infection. The bacterium (Edwardsiella tarda) infects freshwater-dwelling animals and transmission occurs through consuming infected animals or contact with contaminated water. Symptoms are determined by the location of the infection. Healthy people are often able to fight of the infection but those with an underlying illness or poor immune systems may be more susceptible.
  • Ehrlichiosis: Bacterial tick-borne disease
  • Eikenella corrodens infection: A type of anaerobic bacterial infection. The bacterium (Eikenella corrodens) is normally found in tooth plaque and can cause infection in various parts of the body. It tends to occur in patients with head and neck cancers or diabetics and drug users who lick their needles. Symptoms will depend on the location of the infection.
  • Encephalitis: Dangerous infection of the brain
  • Enteroaggregative E. Coli infection: A bacterial infection that results from ingesting contaminated food or water and results in diarrhea that tends to last for weeks. It most often causes diarrhea in children in developing countries. Enteroaggregative refers to the grouping nature of the bacterial attack on the intestinal lining.
  • Enterohemorrhagic E. Coli infection: A bacterial infection that results from ingesting contaminated food or water and results in bloody diarrhea. Enterohemorrhagic refers to the intestinal bleeding associated with the infection.
  • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia Coli Infection: An Escherichia Coli infection that occurs in the bowel causing an enterohemorrhagic condition
  • Enteroinvasive E. Coli infection: A type of bacterial infection that results from ingesting contaminated food or water and results in gastroenteritis. Enteroinvasive refers to the invasion of bacteria into the gastrointestinal lining. It tends to occur as occasional outbreaks in developed countries and as endemic infections in developing countries.
  • Enteropathogenic E. Coli infection: A bacterial infection that results from ingesting contaminated food or water and results in watery and sometimes bloody diarrhea. It most often causes diarrhea in infants in developing countries. Contaminated drinking water and meat products are the main source of infection. Enteropathogenic refers to the way that the bacteria use specific proteins to adhere to the intestinal lining.
  • Enterotoxigenic E. Coli infection: A bacterial infection that results from ingesting contaminated food or water and results in diarrhea. It most often causes diarrhea in infants and travelers in underdeveloped countries where there is poor sanitation. Contaminated drinking water, soft cheese and raw vegetables are the main source of infection. Symptoms may vary from mild to severe. Enterotoxigenic refers to the fact that the bacteria produce toxins.
  • Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: Bacterial infection of the digestive system
  • Epidemic typhus: An infectious disease caused by Rickettsia prowazekii and transmitted by body lice. The severity of the illness may range from moderate to fatal.
  • Epiglotitis: Inflamation of the epiglottis in the throat
  • Erysipelas: A severe streptococcal bacterial infection where infection spreads from the skin to tissue underneath. The face and extremities are the usual sites affected.
  • Erysipeloid: A dermatitis or cellulitis of the hand and fingers
  • Erythema chronicum migrans: The first stage of Lyme disease which is transmitted by the bite of the Ixodid tick. The first stage involves a skin rash with systemic symptoms also often occurring.
  • Erythrasma: A condition where there is a bacterial skin infection that is located in the armpits or the groin
  • Escharonodulaire: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Escherichia coli O157:H7: A form of bacteria commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract
  • Farmer's lung -- Thermoactinomyces vulgaris: Inhalation of moldy contaminated with bacteria (Thermoactinomyces vulgaris) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the bacteria in the moldy hay particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Fever: Elevation of the body temperature above the normal 37 degrees celsius
  • Flavimonas oryzihabitans: A very rare bacterial infection that is most likely to occur in immunocompromised patients or through the use of catheters. Flavimonas oryzihabitans was previous known as Pseudomonas oryzihabitans.
  • Fournier Gangrene: A necrotizing bacterial infection of the skin on the genitals and perineum. The condition progresses rapidly and immediate medical attention is vital to prevent the bacteria entering the blood steam and resulting in death. It is usually the male genitals that are affected. The risk of the condition is increased by surgery, extreme obesity, diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, leukemia and immune system disorders.
  • Francisella tularenis infection: Francisella tularenis is a type of bacteria that can cause infection involving the skin, respiratory and gastrointestinal systems. The nature and severity of symptoms varies depending on the location of the infection. The bacteria primarily causes localized tissue necrosis. The pathogen is considered a possible biological weapon.
  • Gastroenteritis: Acute stomach or intestine inflammation
  • Gastrointestinal Anthrax: Anthrax of the digestive system.
  • Glanders: An infectious disease caused by a bacterium (Burkholderia mallei). It is usually a disease that affects horses and mules but can also infect other animals and humans. Human infection usually occurs in laboratory settings or in those with prolonged contact with infected animals. Symptoms are determined by whether infection occurs through the skin or via the lungs or blood stream. Bloodstream infections are the most severe and usually result in death within weeks.
  • Gonococcal urethritis: An infection of the urethra causing inflammation by a gonococcal organism
  • Gonorrhea: Common sexually transmitted disease often without symptoms.
  • Granuloma inguinale: Granulomous disease spread sexually.
  • Granulomatous amebic encephalitis: Brain/CNS infection from Acanthamoeba bacteria
  • Group A Streptococcal Infections: "Strep" bacteria responsible for strep throat, impetigo and some other strep conditions.
  • Group B Streptococcal Infections: "Strep" bacteria that may affect newborns and the immune-compromised; compare strep A.
  • HIV/AIDS: HIV is a sexually transmitted virus and AIDS is the progressive immune failure that HIV causes.
  • Hair loss: Loss or thinning of head or body hair
  • Helicobacter cinaedi infection: Helicobacter cinaedi is a food borne bacterial infection which may cause mild to severe gastroenteritis.
  • Helicobacter fenneliae infection: Helicobacter fenneliae is a food borne bacterial infection which may cause mild to severe gastroenteritis.
  • Helicobacter pylori bacteria: A bacteria that can infect the gastrointestinal system
  • Hemophilus influenzae B: Bacterial respiratory infection with dangerous complications.
  • Hidradenitis Suppurativa: A bacterial skin infection that occurs when sweat glands become blocked. Inflamed, pus producing nodules develop and eventually cause scarring. Mainly affects sweat glands in the armpits, groin, breasts and anal areas.
  • Honeymoon Bladder: Urinary tract infection, usually in women, arising from period of frequent sexual intercourse.
  • Human carcinogen -- Helicobacter Pylori infection: Helicobacter Pylori infection is deemed to be carcinogenic to humans. Infection with the virus does not mean the patient will definitely develop cancer but the risk of cancer is increased.
  • Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis: A rare infectious condition caused by infection with a type of bacteria called Ehrlichia (Anaplasma phagocytophilia) which attack granulocytes (a type of white blood cell). The infection is transmitted by the deer and American dog tick.
  • Human monocytic ehrlichiosis: A rare infectious condition caused by infection with a type of bacteria called Ehrlichia (Ehrlichia chaffeensis) which attack monocytes(a type of white blood cell). The infection is transmitted by the Lone Star and American dog tick.
  • Humidifier lung -- Bacillus spp.: Inhalation of humidifier vapors contaminated with a pathogen called (Bacillus spp.) can cause various lung symptoms in occupational settings. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the pathogens. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Hypothermia: Low body temperature
  • Hypoxemia: low oxygen levels in the arterial blood in the body
  • Impetigo: Contagious skin rash from bacteria
  • India tick typhus: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Indian tick fever: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Infant botulism food poisoning: Very dangerous food poisoning needing medical attention.
  • Infection with Mycobacterium marinum: An infectious disease caused by a bacterium called Mycobacterium marinum which can infect fish and humans. It is often transmitted through contact with contaminated fresh or salt water e.g. handling water in aquariums or swimming.
  • Interstitial cystitis: A rare condition involving inflammatory disease of the bladder which progresses slowly.
  • Intestinal pseudo-obstruction: A digestive disorder where the intestines are unable to contract normally and push food through the digestive system. This results in symptoms similar to an obstruction and hence the name pseudo-obstruction. The walls of the affected gastrointestinal tract becomes thin and the muscles that control its motion start to degenerate.
  • Invasive group A Streptococcal disease: Infection with Group A Streptococcal bacteria
  • Irons-Bhan syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by lymphoedema in the legs, heart defects and a hydrocele (swollen testicles).
  • Irritable bowel syndrome: Spasms in the colon wall
  • Israeli spotted fever: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Kenya fever: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Kenya tick typhus: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Kenya tick-bite fever: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Latent tuberculosis: Infection with the bacteria causing tuberculosis but without any disease or symptoms.
  • Legionella adelaidensis infection: Legionella adelaidensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella anisa infection: Legionella anisa is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella beliardensis infection: Legionella beliardensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella birminghamensis infection: Legionella birminghamensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella bozemanii infection: Legionella bozemanii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella bruneiensis infection: Legionella bruneiensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella brunensis infection: Legionella brunensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella busanensis infection: Legionella busanensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella cherrii infection: Legionella cherrii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella cincinnatiensis infection: Legionella cincinnatiensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella donaldsonii infection: Legionella donaldsonii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella donaldsonil infection: Legionella donaldsonil is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella drancourtii infection: Legionella drancourtii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella drozanskii infection: Legionella drozanskii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella dumofii infection: Legionella dumofii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella erythra infection: Legionella erythra is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella fairfieldensis infection: Legionella fairfieldensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella fallonii infection: Legionella falloni is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella feelei infection: Legionella feelei is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella feeleii infection: Legionella feeleii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella gesstiana infection: Legionella gesstiana is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella gormanii infection: Legionella micdadei is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella gratiana infection: Legionella gratiana is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella gresilensis infection: Legionella gresilensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella hackeliae infection: Legionella hackeliae is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella impletisoli infection: Legionella impletisoli is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella isrealensis infection: Legionella isrealensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella jamestowniensis infection: Legionella jamestowniensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella jordanis infection: Legionella jordanis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella lansingensis infection: Legionella lansingensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella londinensis infection: Legionella londinensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella longbeachae infection: Legionella longbeachae is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment, especially potting mixes and compost. Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella lytica infection: Legionella lytica is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella maceachemii infection: Legionella maceachemii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella maceachernii infection: Legionella maceachernii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella micdadei infection: Legionella micdadei is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella monrovica infection: Legionella monrovica is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella moravica infection: Legionella moravica is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella nautarum infection: Legionella nautarum is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella oakridgensis infection: Legionella oakridgensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella parisiensis infection: Legionella parisiensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella quateirensis infection: Legionella quateirensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella quinlivanii infection: Legionella quinlivanii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella rowbothamii infection: Legionella rowbothamii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella rubrilucens infection: Legionella rubrilucens is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella sainthelensi infection: Legionella sainthelensi is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella santicrucis infection: Legionella santicrucis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella shakespearei infection: Legionella shakespearei is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella spiritensis infection: Legionella spiritensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella steigerwaltii infection: Legionella steigerwaltii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella tauriensis infection: Legionella tauriensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella tusconensis infection: Legionella tucsonensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella wadsorthii infection: Legionella wadsorthii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella wadsworthii infection: Legionella wadsworthii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella waltersii infection: Legionella moravica is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella worsliensis infection: Legionella worsliensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella yabuuchiae infection: Legionella yabuuchiae is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionnaires' disease: A severe respiratory disease which is caused by the Legionella pneumophila bacteria. The condition can result in pneumonia and can be life-threatening.
  • Leprosy: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves.
  • Leprosy, susceptibility to, 1: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves. The range of manifestations and severity of symptoms is quite variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic mutations linked to an increased susceptibility to leprosy. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10p13.
  • Leprosy, susceptibility to, 2: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves. The range of manifestations and severity of symptoms is quite variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic mutations linked to an increased susceptibility to leprosy. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25.2-q27.
  • Leprosy, susceptibility to, 3: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves. The range of manifestations and severity of symptoms is quite variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic mutations linked to an increased susceptibility to leprosy. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 4q32 and 4p14.
  • Leprosy, susceptibility to, 4: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves. The range of manifestations and severity of symptoms is quite variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic mutations linked to an increased susceptibility to leprosy. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Leptospirosis: Bacterial infection usually caught from animal urine.
  • Lice: A parasitic insect that can infect humans
  • Listeriosis: Bacterial food poisoning
  • Listeriosis -- granulomatous infantiseptica: Listeria monocytogenes infection that is transmitted from a pregnant woman to the fetus.
  • Listeriosis meningoencephalitis: Listeria monocytogenes infection of the brain and meninges that can occur in immunocompromised people or newborns.
  • Listeriosis of pregnancy: Listeria monocytogenes infection in pregnant women.
  • Listeriosis sepsis: Listeria monocytogenes infection that is transmitted from a pregnant woman to the infant during vaginal delivery or soon after delivery. Can also occur in immunocompromised people.
  • Lyme disease: Lyme disease is an emerging infectious disease caused by at least three species of bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia.
  • Lymphogranuloma venereum: Type of chlamydia (sexually transmitted disease)
  • Lysteria monocytoigeneses meningitis: A very rare form of meningitis (bacterial infection of the brain membrane or meninges) caused by Listeria monocytogenes. The condition is more common in the elderly and those with poor immune system and death is common.
  • MHC class 1 or class 2 deficiency: An inherited immunodeficiency disorder involving a deficiency of class I and II major histocompatibility complexes. Serious infections can result.
  • Malignant Buotonneuse fever: A serious complication of Buotonneuse fever that tends to occur mainly in patients who are old or have other conditions such as heart disease.
  • Marseilles fever: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Mastitis: Infected breast common in nursing mothers
  • Mediterranean Spotted Fever: A condition caused by Rickettsia rickettsia transmitted by the tick
  • Melioidosis: Bacterial infection from soil or water.
  • Mendelian susceptibility to atypical mycobacteria: A very rare group of disorders where a person without an immune deficiency is susceptible to infection by weak mycobacterial organisms, nontuberculous and environmental mycobacteria e.g. Calmette-Guerin Bacillus (BCG). The severity of the disorder is greatly variable and ranges from a localized recurring non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection to a potentially fatal BCG infection. Most people who are infected with these organisms have no symptoms but a genetic mutation in some people makes them more susceptible.
  • Meningitis: Dangerous infection of the membranes surrounding the brain.
  • Meningococcal A: Meningococcal meningitis is an infection that causes inflammation of the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. Meningococcal meningitis A is caused by meningococcus A which is mostly common in hyperendemic areas in Africa known as the meningitis belt.
  • Meningococcal B: Meningococcal meningitis B is an infection that causes inflammation of the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord.
  • Meningococcal C: Meningitis C is a strain of meningococcal meningitis, a bacterial infection of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord.
  • Meningococcal disease: Dangerous bacterial infection causing meningitis or bacteremia.
  • Meningococcal infection: A rare infectious disease caused by a bacterium called Neisseria meningitides.
  • Meningococcemia: A rare infectious disease whose main symptoms are upper respiratory tract infection, fever, rash and eye and ear problems.
  • Microbes: A pathogenic microorganism
  • Moraxella catarrhalis infection: An infectious disease caused by Moraxella catarrhalis. Moraxella catarrhalis can be found in the upper respiratory tract and is often harmless and asymptomatic. However, it can also cause ear infections and sinusitis, bronchopulmonary infection as well as other infections.
  • Mountain fever: A viral disease transmitted through the bite of ticks (Rocky Mountain wood tick and American dog tick) who are infected with the virus. Because the virus infects blood cells including erythrocytes, transmission can also occur through transfusion with infected blood but this is uncommon. Infection is most common in Canada and parts of western US. The incubation period usually lasts between 3 and 6 days but can be as long as a few weeks. The virus tends to cause to periods of fever each lasting for a few days.
  • Mountain tick fever: A viral disease transmitted through the bite of ticks (Rocky Mountain wood tick and American dog tick) who are infected with the virus. Because the virus infects blood cells including erythrocytes, transmission can also occur through transfusion with infected blood but this is uncommon. Infection is most common in Canada and parts of western US. The incubation period usually lasts between 3 and 6 days but can be as long as a few weeks. The virus tends to cause to periods of fever each lasting for a few days.
  • Murine typhus: An infectious condition which is characterized by a similar condition to that of typhus due to Rickettsia typhi.
  • Mycobacterial infections: Any infection that is caused by a mycobacterial organisms
  • Mycobacterium Fortuitum: An infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium fortuitum which can be found in soil, dust and water. It usually causes infection of the skin and surrounding area usually after some sort of skin trauma such as an injury or surgery.
  • Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, Susceptibility to: There are a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing tuberculosis. Many people are infected with tuberculosis but develop no symptoms whereas others develop active disease. Yet other patients tend to develop a severe form of the condition where the brain and central nervous system are involved. Studies indicate that various genes may be responsible for an increased susceptibility to the infection and likewise, other genes are responsible for increased resistance to tuberculosis.
  • Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, Susceptibility to, 1: There are a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing tuberculosis. Many people are infected with tuberculosis but develop no symptoms whereas others develop active disease. Yet other patients tend to develop a severe form of the condition where the brain and central nervous system are involved. Studies indicate that various genes may be responsible for an increased susceptibility to the infection and likewise, other genes are responsible for increased resistance to tuberculosis. Type 1 refers to an increased susceptibility to tuberculosis which is linked to a gene on chromosome 2q35.
  • Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, Susceptibility to, 2: There are a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing tuberculosis. Many people are infected with tuberculosis but develop no symptoms whereas others develop active disease. Yet other patients tend to develop a severe form of the condition where the brain and central nervous system are involved. Studies indicate that various genes may be responsible for an increased susceptibility to the infection and likewise, other genes are responsible for increased resistance to tuberculosis. Type 2 refers to an increased susceptibility to tuberculosis which is linked to a gene on chromosome 8q12-q13.
  • Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, Susceptibility to, 3: There are a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing tuberculosis. Many people are infected with tuberculosis but develop no symptoms whereas others develop active disease. Yet other patients tend to develop a severe form of the condition where the brain and central nervous system are involved. Studies indicate that various genes may be responsible for an increased susceptibility to the infection and likewise, other genes are responsible for increased resistance to tuberculosis. Type 3 refers to an increased susceptibility to tuberculosis which is linked to a gene on chromosome 20q13.31-q33.
  • Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, Susceptibility to, X-linked: There are a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing tuberculosis. Many people are infected with tuberculosis but develop no symptoms whereas others develop active disease. Yet other patients tend to develop a severe form of the condition where the brain and central nervous system are involved. Studies indicate that various genes may be responsible for an increased susceptibility to the infection and likewise, other genes are responsible for increased resistance to tuberculosis. The X-linked type refers to an increased susceptibility to tuberculosis which is linked to the X chromosome.
  • Mycobacterium abscessus: A form of mycobacterium
  • Mycobacterium avium Complex: Bacterial infection that is often AIDS-related.
  • Mycobacterium avium complex infection: Infection with an opportunistic group of bacteria. It tends to occur in immunocompromised people such as those with HIV.
  • Mycobacterium bovis: A form of mycobacterium
  • Mycobacterium haemophilum: A form of mycobacterium
  • Mycobacterium kansasii: A form of mycobacterium
  • Mycobacterium scrofulaceum: A form of mycobacterium
  • Mycobacterium ulcerans: A form of mycobacterium
  • Mycobacterium xenopi: A form of mycobacterium
  • Mycoplasma pneumoniae: Bacterial respiratory infection
  • Naegleria: Rare bacterial infection from contaminated water
  • Nanukayami:
  • Necrobacillosis: A form of bacterial blood infection caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum which can occur as a complication of throat infections. The infection is potentially fatal and can cause the development of abscesses in various parts of the body including the brain and lungs .
  • Necrotizing fasciitis: A severe, progressive skin infection which causes progressive destruction of skin and underlying tissue. It is caused by certain bacteria and has a high mortality rate.
  • Neonatal bacterial meningitis: Bacterial meningitis that occurs in an infant under 3 months of age. Bacterial meningitis is a bacterial brain infection.
  • Neonatal tetanus: Muscle tetanus of the very young infant
  • Neurosyphilis: A complication of untreated syphilis where the infection invades the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) and causes a range of neurological symptoms. The condition can be life-threatening but some cases are asymptomatic. There are four forms of the condition: asymptomatic, meningovascular, tabes dorsalis and general paresis.
  • Neurosyphilis -- asymptomatic: An invasion of the nervous system by syphilis which causes no symptoms. It generally occurs before the symptoms of syphilis appear.
  • Neurosyphilis -- general paresis: A complication of untreated syphilis where the infection invades the brain cells and causes a range of neurological symptoms. The condition is progressive and life-threatening.
  • Neurosyphilis -- meningovascular: A complication of untreated syphilis where the infection invades the central nervous system and causes cranial nerve palsies and pupil abnormalities.
  • Neurosyphilis -- tabes dorsalis: A complication of untreated syphilis where the infection invades the spinal cord and progressively impairs muscle function and nerve damage may also occur. This form of the condition is progressive and life-threatening.
  • Neutropenia: Reduced number of granulocytes in the blood
  • Nocardiosis: A rare infectious disease caused by the bacteria Nocardia asteroides which primarily affects the lung but may also involve the brain, soft tissues and other organs.
  • Non-genetic diseases: Any disease that does not have a genetic component
  • Opportunistic infections related to HIV infection: it usually occurs when the CD4 cell count drops to less than 200cells/mm.
  • Paratyphoid fever: A condition which is caused by the bacterium Salmonella Paratyphi
  • Pasteurella multocida: An infectious disease caused by a bacterium called Pasteurella multocida. It is often transmitted through bites and scratches from pets and it can be found in mammals and fowl.
  • Pemphigus neonatorum: A group of conditions affecting the new born that resembles pemphigus
  • Pinta: An infectious skin disease caused by infection with the spirochete Treponema carateum which causes skin rash and discoloration.
  • Plague: A rare but serious bacterial infection involving the bacterium Yersinia Pestis which can be carried by rodents and transmitted to humans by flea bites or through direct contact with an infected animal.
  • Pneumococcal meningitis: Pneumococcal meningitis is an inflammation or infection of the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (also called pneumococcus).
  • Pneumococcal pneumonia: Lung pneumnoia from streptococcus bacteria.
  • Pneumococcus: Bacteria causing ear infections, pneumococcal pneumonia, and pneumococcal meningitis.
  • Pneumonia: Infection of the lung by bacteria, viruses or fungus.
  • Pneumonia caused by serotype O11 Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: Inflammation of the lungs and bronchioles caused by an opportunistic pathogen called Pseudomonas Aeruginosa.
  • Pneumonia, Bacterial: Inflammation of the lungs and bronchioles caused by bacteria.
  • Pneumonia, Staphylococcal: Inflammation of the lungs and bronchioles caused by the Staphylococcal bacteria. The condition is not common and often occurs as a complication of influenza or other viral respiratory infections. This form of pneumonia is considered serious and up to a third of cases can result in death.
  • Pneumonic plague: Severe flea-borne bacterial disease affecting the lungs
  • Pontiac fever: Mild form of legionellosis usually in healthy people.
  • Post streptococcal glomerulonephritis: Kidney complication (glomerulonephritis) following streptococcal infection
  • Post-Streptococcal Neurologic Disorders: A rare autoimmune disorder where the body develops an abnormal autoimmune response to streptococcal infection and causes neurological symptoms.
  • Primary agammaglobulinemia: A genetic disorder characterized by a deficiency of antibodies due to abnormal development of B lymphocytes.
  • Primary syphilis: A condition which is characterized by a primary chancre which is infectious and painless
  • Progressive Vaccinia: Progressive vaccinia is a serious complication of smallpox vaccination. The condition involves progressive death of tissue (necrosis) at the site of the vaccination. The condition is relatively rare but can result in death so prompt diagnosis and treatment is essential. People with AIDS, immunodeficiencies, cancer, receiving immunosuppressive therapies or have some other form of immune system defect are particularly susceptible to this complication.
  • Prostatic tuberculosis: Tuberculous prostatitis must be viewed as a systemic disease, and the treatment is primarily medical. Hospitalization is usually unnecessary but may be required to treat noncompliant patients.
  • Pseudomonas infections: A condition which is caused by infection of the human body by pseudomonas
  • Pseudomonas pseudomallei: A form of pseudomonas
  • Pseudomonas stutzeri infections: A bacterial infection found in soil and water environments.
  • Psittacosis: An infectious disease caused by Chlamydia psittaci and transmitted mainly by infected birds but also by some mammals.
  • Ptomaine food poisoning: Food poisoning caused by toxic products from bacterial metabolism
  • Pulmonary Anthrax: Inhaled lung anthrax, most severe form of anthrax.
  • Pyogenic pericarditis: The pericardium is the fibrous sac surrounding the heart. Infection can cause the pericardium to become inflamed and swollen and to produce pus. It may result from a ruptured esophagus, heart infection or from surgery involving the heart or chest cavity. The condition may be misdiagnosed as a heart attack and vice versa.
  • Pyomyositis: A bacterial infection of the muscles caused by Staphylococcus aureus. It occurs in tropical areas and people with weak immune systems are the most vulnerable.
  • Q fever: A disease caused by Coxiella burnetti which causes fever, headache and muscle pain.
  • Queensland tick typhus: Form of typhus from North-Australian ticks
  • Rapid breathing: Excessively rapid breathing
  • Recrudescent typhus: A condition characterized by mild typhus occurring years after the initial infection
  • Relapsing fever: Tick-borne disease with symptoms that resolve and then relapse
  • Renal tuberculosis: Kidney affected by tuberculosis
  • Respiratory diphtheria: Lung infection from Diphtheria
  • Rheumatic fever: An inflammatory disorder that can occur as a complication of untreated streptococcal bacterial infection such as strep throat or scarlet fever. The condition may affect the brain, skin, heart and joints.
  • Rheumatic heart disease: Chronic heart condition due to heart damage from rheumatic fever
  • Rhodococcus equi: A rare form of bacterial infection that usually affects horses and foals but can cause infection mainly in immunocompromised people. Infection usually starts at the site of some sort of trauma. Symptoms and severity may vary considerably depending on the location and extent of the infection.
  • Rickettsia: A self limiting condition that is transmitted by mites
  • Rickettsia siberica: An infectious disease caused by Rickettsia siberica and transmitted by ticks. The condition is endemic in central Asia and can be fatal in severe cases.
  • Rickettsia typhi: An infectious diseases caused by Rickettsia typhi and transmitted by fleas. It is a generally mild form of typhus which rarely causes death.
  • Rickettsial disease: A disease caused by infection with rickettsial bacteria which are transmitted by arthropods such as ticks, mites and lice. Different rickettsial bacteria can cause different types of infections such as typhus, spotted fever and trench fever. Symptoms can vary somewhat between the different types.
  • Ricketttsialpox: An infectious disease caused by Rickettsia akari and transmitted by mice mites.
  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever: A bacterial disease caused by Rickettsia rickettsii and transmitted by ticks. The condition causes fever and a characteristic rash and may be fatal in severe or untreated cases.
  • STARI: Bacterial infection and skin rash due to illness from a tick bite
  • Salmonella anatum infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella choleraesuis infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella enteritidis: Type of salmonella food poisoning usually from eggs.
  • Salmonella enteritidis infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella food poisoning: Common type of food poisoning.
  • Salmonella heidelberg infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella hirschfeldii infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella newport infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella paratyphi A infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which causes typhoid fever, with symptoms such as gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella schottmuelleri infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella typhi infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which causes typhoid fever, with symptoms such as gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella typhimurium infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which can result in gastroenteritis, fever or may be asymptomatic. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Scarlet fever: A complication of infection from strep bacteria such as strep throat.
  • Scarletina (Scarlet Fever): Infection with a Group A streptococcus bacteria, which causes a characteristic sore throat and rash.
  • Scombrotoxic fish poisoning: Bacterial food poisoning from eating contaminated fish
  • Scrub typhus: Type of typhus usually caught from ticks
  • Secondary syphilis: A condition which is characterized by fever, multiform skin eruptions, iritis, alopecia, mucous patches and severe pain in the head and joints
  • Sennetsu Fever: A rare infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Ehrlichia sennetsu.
  • Sepsis: The presence of pathological micro-organisms in the blood
  • Septicemia: A systemic inflammatory response to an infection.
  • Serratia: An infectious disease caused by bacteria from the Serratia genus. The bacteria can cause urinary tract infection, pneumonia, respiratory tract infections, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, septicemia, eye infection, meningitis and wound infections. This type of bacterial infection shows some antibiotic resistance. Symptoms and severity depend on the location and extent of the infection.
  • Serratia cerebral abscess: Cerebral abscess caused by bacteria from the Serratia genus. These bacteria are a rare cause of infection. The risk of infection is increased by head trauma or any sort of surgery or testing involving the central nervous system.
  • Serratia ear infection: Ear infection caused by bacteria from the Serratia genus. These bacteria are a rare cause of infection.
  • Serratia meningitis: Meningitis caused by bacteria from the Serratia genus. These bacteria are a rare cause of infection. The risk of infection is increased by head trauma or any sort of surgery or testing involving the central nervous system.
  • Serratia respiratory tract infection: Respiratory tract infection caused by bacteria from the Serratia genus. These bacteria are a rare cause of infection.
  • Serratia sepsis: Blood infection caused by bacteria from the Serratia genus. These bacteria are a rare cause of infection.
  • Serratia urinary tract infection: Urinary tract infection caused by bacteria from the Serratia genus. These bacteria are a rare cause of infection. The risk of infection is increased in patients with diabetes mellitus, kidney failure, urinary tract obstruction or a recent urinary tract surgery.
  • Shigella boydii: A form of bacterium
  • Shigella boydii infection: Shigella boydii is a species of bacteria from the Shigella genus. Infection with this bacteria causes diarrhea. The severity of the disease is variable depending on the underlying health of the individual - the young and old tend to be more severely affected. Infection usually occurs through the fecal-oral route. Infection can be transmitted between people unless appropriate hygiene measures are undertaken. Some infected patients are asymptomatic and are those more likely to transmit infection to other people.
  • Shigella dysenteriae infection: Shigella dysenteriae is a species of bacteria from the Shigella genus. Dysenteriae is the most common cause of epidemic dysentery in condensed populations such as refugee camps. Infection with this bacteria causes diarrhea. The severity of the disease is variable depending on the underlying health of the individual - the young and old tend to be more severely affected. Infection usually occurs through the fecal-oral route. Infection can be transmitted between people unless appropriate hygiene measures are undertaken. Some infected patients are asymptomatic and are those more likely to transmit infection to other people.
  • Shigella flexneri: A form of bacterium
  • Shigella flexneri infection: Shigella flexneri is a species of bacteria from the Shigella genus. Flexneri is the most common cause of Shigellosis in the world. Infection with this bacteria causes diarrhea. The severity of the disease is variable depending on the underlying health of the individual - the young and old tend to be more severely affected. Infection usually occurs through the fecal-oral route. Infection can be transmitted between people unless appropriate hygiene measures are undertaken. Some infected patients are asymptomatic and are those more likely to transmit infection to other people.
  • Shigella sonnei: A form of bacterium
  • Shigella sonnei infection: Shigella sonnei is a species of bacteria from the Shigella genus. Sonnei is the most common cause of Shigellosis in the developed world. Infection with this bacteria causes diarrhea. The severity of the disease is variable depending on the underlying health of the individual - the young and old tend to be more severely affected. Infection usually occurs through the fecal-oral route. Infection can be transmitted between people unless appropriate hygiene measures are undertaken. Some infected patients are asymptomatic and are those more likely to transmit infection to other people.
  • Shigellosis: An infectious disease which affects the intestinal tract and is caused by the Shigella bacteria. The condition may be severe, especially in children, but may be asymptomatic in some cases. The disease can be transmitted through fecal-oral contact.
  • Short Bowel Syndrome: Disorder of shortened bowel usually from bowel surgery.
  • Sialadenitis: Salivary gland inflammation due to obstruction of the salivary gland or a duct.
  • Sinusitis: Sinusitis is an inflammation of the paranasal sinuses.
  • Small bowel bacterial overgrowth syndrome: The small bowel is a part of the digestive system. A healthy small bowel contains some bacteria but in bacterial overgrowth syndrome, there are an excessive number of bacteria. Abnormal small bowel muscle function is often associated with conditions such as intestinal motility problems due to neurological diseases and muscular diseases, diabetes mellitus, small intestine obstruction and diverticulitis. It may also be caused by certain medications and abdominal surgeries.
  • Spirochetes disease: Infection with a type of bacteria which is often found in mud, sewage and polluted water. Symptoms are determined by the species involved. Diseases caused by this bacteria include Treponema infection and borreliosis.
  • Sporotrichosis: A fungal skin infection caused by the fungus Sporothrix schenckii. Usually only the skin is infected but bones, lungs and central nervous system can rarely be affected also. Transmission usually occurs through infection of a skin wound.
  • Sporotrichosis -- pulmonary: A fungal infection caused by the fungus Sporothrix schenckii. Usually only the skin is infected but bones, lungs and central nervous system can rarely be affected also. Transmission usually occurs through inhalation of the fungus.
  • Spotted fevers: An acute condition caused by the bacteria Rickettsia rickettsii
  • Staphylococcal food poisoning: A gastrointestinal disease caused by consuming food or drink contaminated by toxins made by a bacteria called Staphylococcus aureus.
  • Staphylococcal infection: Any infection caused by the bacteria staphylococcal
  • Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome: A very rare, potentially fatal infection caused by the bacterial toxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. The condition is often associated with tampon use but can originate from other sources.
  • Staphylococcus aureus food poisoning: Common type of food poisoning.
  • Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: A bacteria that is usually found in aquatic environments, is not very virulent and rarely infects humans. Most cases of infection tends to occur through use of hospital appliances such as catheters, I.V lines and breathing tubes in immunocompromised people.
  • Strep throat: Streptococcal bacterial throat infection.
  • Streptococcal Group A invasive disease: Group A streptococci are bacteria which are commonly found in the throat or on the skin. Often it causes no symptoms but in some cases it can cause mild illnesses such as strep throat or more serious, life-threatening diseases such as toxic shock syndrome or flesh-eating disease. Transmission can occur through direct contact with infected skin sores or nose and throat discharges. Symptoms are determined by the location and extent of the bacterial infection.
  • Streptococcal Group B invasive disease: Infection with bacteria called Group B Streptococcus which can cause severe symptoms or even death. The bacteria occur in the stomach and the urogenital tract of females and are normally harmless and cause no symptoms. However, it can cause a range of diseases in newborns, the elderly and people with poor immune systems.
  • Streptococcal Infections: Various "strep" bacterial infections.
  • Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome: Toxic shock from streptococcal bacteria infection.
  • Syphilis: A sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria (Treponema pallidum). The condition is often asymptomatic in the early stages but one or more sores may be present in the early stages. Untreated syphilis usually results in remission of visible symptoms but further severe damage may occur to internal organs and other body tissues which can result in death.
  • Syphilis, latent: A rare infectious diseases which is transmitted through sexual contact and caused by Treponema pallidum (a spirochete bacterium). Latent syphilis is the term used to describe the period (usually following the second stage) where the patient has no symptoms but still has the infection.
  • Syphilitic aseptic meningitis: A chronic syphilis infection which affects the nervous system.
  • Tachycardia: Excessively rapid heart beat.
  • Tertiary syphilis: A condition which is characterized by late generalized syphilis with involvement of many organs and tissues
  • Tetanus: A disease caused by chemicals which are produced by a bacterium (clostridium tetani) and are toxic to the nerves. The infection usually occurs when the bacteria enter the body through a deep wound - these bacteria are anaerobic and hence don't need oxygen to survive.
  • The clap: A sexually transmitted infection by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae.
  • Toxic Shock Syndrome: Severe immune reaction causing shock
  • Tracheitis: Inflammation of the trachea
  • Trachoma: Chronic bacterial eye condition in the developing world
  • Treponema infection: A rare infectious diseases which is transmitted through sexual contact and caused by Treponema pallidum (a spirochete bacterium). Untreated cases can result in severe complications and even death.
  • Tuberculosis: Bacterial infection causing nodules forming, most commonly in the lung.
  • Tuberculosis, pulmonary: Lung infection caused by a contagious bacterium called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Infection occurs through inhalation of contaminants from infected people. Infection may spread from the lungs to other organs. The infection may incubate for years, be asymptomatic or produced symptoms within weeks. Immunocompromised people may suffer severe symptoms.
  • Tuberculous meningitis: Tuberculous meningitis is an infection of the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord caused by Koch's bacillus.
  • Tuberculous pericarditis: Inflammation and swelling of the pericardium (fibrous sac surrounding the heart) that occurs as a complication of tuberculosis. The condition may be misdiagnosed as a heart attack and vice versa.
  • Tuberculous uveitis: Eye infection by a tuberculous bacteria called Mycobacteriu tuberculosis. The eye infection may occur secondary to a tuberculous infection of the rest of the body or it may occur only in the eye.
  • Tularemia: A rare infections disease caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis (a gram-negative pleomorphic coccobacillus). Transmission occurs through contact with infected animals or there habitats e.g. bites from infected insects or other animals, eating infected wild animals, contact with contaminated water and soil. Symptoms can vary greatly depending on the method of infection. For example infection through inhalation can cause symptoms similar to pneumonia, eating infected animals can cause a sore throat and abdominal symptoms and transmission through the skin can cause result in a painful skin ulcer.
  • Typhoid fever: Fever from bacterial food poisoning.
  • Typhus: A general name for various arthropod-borne rickettsial infections
  • Ureaplasma urealyticum: A condition which is characterized by urethritis in males and genital tract infections in females
  • Urosepsis: Can be used interchangeably to describe either (a) urinary tract infection (UTI) or (b) the rare occurrence of bacterial seeding into the blood stream due to an UTI causing a generalised infection.
  • Vaccinia gangrenosa: Vaccinia gangrenosa is a serious complication of smallpox vaccination. The condition involves progressive death of tissue (necrosis) at the site of the vaccination. The condition is relatively rare but can result in death so prompt diagnosis and treatment is essential. People with AIDS, immunodeficiencies, cancer, receiving immunosuppressive therapies or have some other form of immune system defect are particularly susceptible to this complication.
  • Vaccinia necrosum: Vaccinia necrosum is a serious complication of smallpox vaccination. The condition involves progressive death of tissue (necrosis) at the site of the vaccination. The condition is relatively rare but can result in death so prompt diagnosis and treatment is essential. People with AIDS, immunodeficiencies, cancer, receiving immunosuppressive therapies or have some other form of immune system defect are particularly susceptible to this complication.
  • Vaginosis (bacterial vaginosis): A bacterial infection of the vagina causing offensive discharge.
  • Vancomycin resistant enterococcal bacteremia: A condition which is characterised by bacteremia caused by an enterococci that is resistant to vancomycin.
  • Vibrio: An organism of the genus Vibrio or other spiral motile organism
  • Vibrio infection -- Vibrio cincinnatiensis: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio cincinnatiensis. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. This particular infection however tends to cause mainly meningitis. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection -- Vibrio damsela: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio damsela. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Wound infection is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia and gastroenteritis is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection -- Vibrio fluvialis: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio fluvialis. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection -- Vibrio furnissii: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio furnissii. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia and wound infection is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection -- Vibrio holisae: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio holisae. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection -- Vibrio metschnikovii: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio metschnikovii. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection -- Vibrio mimicus: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio mimicus. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia and wound infection is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio mimicus food poisoning: Ingestion of food or water contaminated with a particular bacteria (Vibrio mimicus).
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus: Bacteria commonly infecting oysters and seafood.
  • Vibrio vulnificus: Bacteria commonly infecting oysters and seafood.
  • Vibrio vulnificus infection: The infection by the vibrio vulnificus bacteria
  • Waterhouse-Friederichsen syndrome: A rare syndrome that occurs as complication of septicemia (often due to meningococcal or pneumococcal infection) and involves blood coagulation in blood vessels, adrenal gland hemorrhages and ultimately kidney failure.
  • Weil syndrome: A rare infectious disorder which affects liver and kidney function and also causes hemorrhaging. It is a severe form of the second phase of leptospirosis which is an infection caused by the spiral shaped bacteria Leptospira interrogans which is transmitted from animals to humans.
  • Weil's syndrome: Severe form of Leptospirosis
  • Whipple's Disease: Rare malabsorption disease from bacterial digestive infection
  • Whooping Cough: An infectious condition caused by the bacteria Bordetella pertussis
  • Yaws: A rare infections disease caused by the spiral-shaped bacteria Treponema pertenue. The disease consists of three phases: skin lesions are followed by bone, joint and widespread skin symptoms and finally by inflammation and destruction of cartilage in the nose, pharynx and palate. Transmission can be through direct contact with infected skin, insect bites or sex.
  • Yersinia pseudotuberculosis: An infectious disease caused by a bacterium called Yersinia pseudotuberculosis which is transmitted from direct and indirect contact with infected animals. Human to human transmission may also occur through fecal-oral contact.
  • Yersiniosis: A condition which is characterized by infectious diarrhea, enteritis, ileitis and occasionally septicaemia

 

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