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Diseases » Bell's Palsy » Glossary
 

Glossary for Bell's Palsy

  • Acitretin- Teratogenic Agent: Reports indicate that the use of Acitretin during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. Acitretin should not be taken by women who are pregnant or planning on becoming pregnant.
  • Acoustic Neurinoma: A benign tumor of the 8th cranial nerve which lies in the tube connecting the inner ear to the brain.
  • Acoustic neuroma: A benign tumor of the 8th cranial nerve which lies in the tube connecting the inner ear to the brain.
  • Adenoid cystic carcinoma: Salivary gland type malignant neoplasm arising from bronchial seromucinous glands. Composed of epithelial and myoepithelial cells in cribriform, tubular and solid growth patterns.
  • Alajouanine syndrome: A birth disorder characterized mainly by clubfoot, strabismus and facial paralysis. The facial paralysis is caused by damage to the 6th and 7th cranial nerve.
  • Albers-Schonberg disease -- intermediate form: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. The intermediate form is more severe than the adult form but less severe than the infantile form. Life expectancy is usually normal.
  • Alternating Hemiplegia: Episodes of one-sided paralysis.
  • Bell's Palsy: A usually temporary facial nerve disorder where a part or all of the face becomes suddenly paralysed.
  • Besnier-Boeck-Schaumann disease: A rare disease where inflammatory granular nodules form in various organs.
  • Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis: A rare condition where inflammation of the brainstem results in various symptoms such as ataxia and ophthalmoplegia. The onset of symptoms is usually acute.
  • Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE): A rare condition where inflammation of the brainstem results in various symptoms such as ataxia and ophthalmoplegia. The onset of symptoms is usually acute.
  • CHARGE Syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by choanal atresia, coloboma, ear and genital abnormalities and congenital heart defects.
  • Cerebral contusion: Injury of the cerebrum often causing bruising when the skin is not broken.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cresols: Cresols are a group of chemicals that occur naturally in mammals and various plants. It is also manufactured and used in the production of disinfectants, deodorizers and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cresylic acid: Cresylic acids are a group of chemicals that are used as solvents and in the manufacture of various products such as deodorants, disinfectants, pesticides, glues, paints, herbicides, pharmaceuticals as well as others. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Cholesteatoma: Uncommon middle ear condition
  • Conjunctivitis: Contagious eye infection
  • Craniodiaphyseal dysplasia: A very rare bone disorder where excess calcium is deposited mainly in the skull bones which can result in compression of various nerves in the skull and even the brain.
  • Craniometaphyseal dysplasia, autosomal recessive type: A rare genetic disorder characterized by head and facial abnormalities as well as mild limb abnormalities. It is a milder form of the disease than the autosomal dominant type.
  • Deafness conductive stapedial ear malformation facial palsy: A rare disorder characterized by conductive deafness, malformed external ears and facial paralysis. The deafness is due to an abnormal bone (stapes) in the inner ear which vibrates to transmit sound messages.
  • Deafness, Conductive Stapedial, With Ear Malformation and Facial Palsy: A rare syndrome characterized by an ear abnormality (due to a stapedial defect) which causes conductive deafness as well as malformed external ears and facial paralysis. The degree and extent of facial paralysis is variable - can affect only one side of face or may be a weakness rather than a paralysis.
  • Diabetes: Failing or reduced ability of the body to handle sugars.
  • Dobrow syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal webbing inside the mouth, short stature, eye problems, mental retardation and small head, jaw, eyes and mouth.
  • Dysosteosclerosis: A rare inherited condition characterized by bone development abnormalities (excessive hardening of bone and flattened vertebrae), characteristic facial features. Excessive bone growth at the base of the skull can damage the optic nerves and affect vision.
  • Ear infection: An infection that affects the ear
  • Eye blinking symptoms: Problems with the ability to blink or excessive blinking
  • Eyelid paralysis: A loss of the motor and or sensory function of the eyelid due to either a muscular or neural mechanism
  • Face symptoms: Symptoms affecting the face
  • Facial asymetry -- temporal seizures: A rare condition characterized mainly by seizures that originate from the temporal lobe of the brain.
  • Facial asymmetry -- temporal seizures: A rare condition characterized mainly by seizures that originate from the temporal lobe of the brain as well as facial asymmetry.
  • Facial pain: Pain affecting the face
  • Facial paralysis: A usually temporary facial nerve disorder where a part or all of the face becomes suddenly paralysed.
  • Fisher (M.) syndrome: A rare type of nerve disease involving muscle coordination problems, eye muscle paralysis and absent reflexes. It appears to be caused by the body's own immune system destroying the protective layer around nerves. The condition is usually preceded by a viral illness and is not life-threatening.
  • Glioma: A rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor.
  • Glioma Susceptibility: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. There have been at least 8 genetic defects linked to an increased glioma susceptibility.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 1: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 3p25.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 2: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 2 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 10q23.31.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 3: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 13q12.3.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 4: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 4 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 15q23-q26.3.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 5: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 5 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 9p21.3.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 6: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 6 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 20q13.33.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 7: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 7 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 8q24.21.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 8: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 8 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 5p15.33.
  • Guillain-Barre Syndrome: A rare progressive form of ascending polyneuropathy believed to be an autoimmune response.
  • HIV/AIDS: HIV is a sexually transmitted virus and AIDS is the progressive immune failure that HIV causes.
  • Heerfordt syndrome: A disorder sometimes associated with sarcoidosis and characterized by inflammation of the uvea of the eye, enlarged salivary gland, fever and facial paralysis.
  • Herpes: Virus with one subtype causing cold sores and another causing genital herpes.
  • Herpes zoster oticus: Facial and auditory effects of herpes zoster
  • Herpesvirus: A group of DNA viruses that occur in humans
  • Hyperacusis: Excessive sensitivity to everyday sounds.
  • Hyperostosis frontalis interna: A disorder where the front bone of the skull becomes thicker than normal.
  • Ichthyosis microphthalmos: A rare genetic disorder characterized by dry scaly skin and small eyes.
  • Infantile axonal neuropathy: A very rare form of progressive nerve damage that starts early in life. The central nervous system is also usually involved.
  • Injury: Any damage inflicted in the body
  • Leprosy: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves.
  • Levic-Stefanovic-Nikolic syndrome: A very rare inherited syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, ophthalmoplegia and a fissured tongue.
  • Lissauer paralysis: Diffuse degeneration of one side of the cerebral cortex which causes dementia, weakness and seizures.
  • Loffredo-Cennamo-Cecio syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by scaly skin and small eyes.
  • Lyme disease: Lyme disease is an emerging infectious disease caused by at least three species of bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia.
  • Melkersson-Rosenthal Syndrome: A rare inherited neurological disorder involving episodes of facial paralysis and swelling.
  • Mental retardation -- myopathy -- short stature -- endocrine defect: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, muscle disease, short stature and endocrine defects.
  • Meretoja syndrome: A form of familial amyloid polyneuropathy characterized by deposits of a substance called amyloid in the skin on the face as well as the facial nerves which can cause symptoms such as weak facial muscles.
  • Mobius syndrome: A rare genetic condition characterized by defective cranial nerves (6th and 7th), deafness, facial nerve paralysis and other abnormalities.
  • Moebius syndrome 1: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by facial paralysis due to problems with 6th and 7th nerve development (Moebius sequence) and ophthalmoplegia.
  • Mononucleosis: Common infectious virus.
  • Motor neuron diseases: Any of various disorders of the "motor neurons", nerves that control movement.
  • Mouth symptoms: Symptoms of the mouth or oral area.
  • Movement disorders: Medical conditions affecting the movement systems, such as walking or tremor.
  • Multiple Sclerosis: Autoimmune attack on spinal nerves causing diverse and varying neural problems.
  • Muscle conditions: Any condition that affects the muscles of the body
  • Muscular dystrophy -- white matter spongiosis: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle problems, seizures and mental retardation.
  • Myopathy: General name for any disease of the muscles.
  • Myopathy, congenital nonprogressive with Moebius and Robin sequences: A rare inherited disorder characterized by nonprogressive muscle weakness from birth as well as the Moebius (congenital facial palsy with impaired ability to move eyes) and Pierre Robin sequence (underdeveloped jaw, cleft soft palate, abnormal tongue position).
  • Myotonic Dystrophy: An inherited disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting as well as eye defects, heart abnormalities and other anomalies. The severity of the condition is greatly variable. There are two type of myotonic dystrophy with type 1 being more severe than type 2.
  • Narcolepsy: Narcolepsy is characterized by the classic tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis.
  • Nerve conditions: Any condition that affects the nerves
  • Nervous system conditions: Diseases affecting the nerves and the nervous system.
  • Neurofibromatosis-2: Genetic disorder often leading to tumors on nerves.
  • Neuromuscular conditions: Conditions affecting the nerve-muscle systems.
  • Opthalmoplegia -- mental retardation -- lingua scrotalis: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by weak or paralyzed eye muscles, mental retardation and a fissured tongue.
  • Osteopathia striata, cranial sclerosis: A rare disorder characterized by striations along most long bones as well as increased bone density in the skull which is associated with various craniofacial defects.
  • Osteopetrosis autosomal dominant type 1: A very rare dominantly inherited syndrome characterized mainly by increased bone density. The increased bone density results because old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone. Only 33 cases in 3 families have been reported. In type I, the increased bone density occurs throughout the body with the skull being the most affected. There is no associated increase in risk of fractures. Many cases are asymptomatic.
  • Osteopetrosis autosomal dominant type 2: A very rare dominantly inherited syndrome characterized mainly by increased bone density that affects mostly the spine, pelvis and base of the skull. The increased bone density results because old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone.
  • Osteopetrosis, autosomal recessive 4: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. The malignant infantile form is the most severe form of this disorder and death usually occurs in the first decade of life.
  • Paragonimiases -- lung infection: Infection by a parasitic worm, Paragonimus westermani, which are a type of lung fluke which invade the lungs and other organs where they cause problems. Infection occurs through eating freshwater crabs and crayfish which have not been cooked sufficiently.
  • Parotid gland cancer: A malignancy that is located in the parotid gland
  • Polio: Dangerous virus now rare due to vaccination.
  • Polyradiculoneuropathy: An inflammatory disorder that affects the peripheral nerves and the spinal nerve roots. The onset and progression of the disease is variable with severe cases resulting in premature death. The condition is chronic and progressive but periodic relapses can occur.
  • Possibly Autoimmune Diseases: Diseases that may be autoimmune or have an autoimmune subtype, but it is unclear or controversial.
  • Ramsay Hunt Syndrome type I: A rare condition involving progressive neurological degeneration. It tends to start in adulthood and progresses over a number of years before ultimately ending in death.
  • Ramsay Hunt syndrome Type II: A condition caused by a reactivation of the herpes simplex virus and resulting in facial paralysis, ear pain and skin blistering.
  • Salivary gland cancer: Salivary gland cancer is a rare form of cancer in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the salivary glands in the mouth, neck or throat
  • Sarcoidosis: Rare autoimmune disease usually affecting the lungs.
  • Sclerosteosis: A rare genetic disorder characterized by syndactyly and thickening and overgrowth of bone.
  • Shingles: Infectious viral infection occuring years after chickenpox infection.
  • Skull fracture: A fracture of the bones of the skull
  • Stroke: Serious brain event from bleeding or blood clots.
  • Stroke symptoms: Brain-related symptoms of bleeding or blockage.
  • Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system: A rare disorder where hemosiderin (free iron) is deposited in parts of the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord tissue). It is often caused by repeated periods of bleeding in the brain (subarachnoid space).
  • Thiolase deficiency: A rare syndrome involving a deficiency of an enzyme called thiolase which results in mental retardation and muscle problems.
  • Transient Ischemic Attack: Temporary disturbance of blood supply to a restricted area of the brain, resulting in brief neurologic dysfunction that persists, by definition, for less than 24 hours.
  • Tumor: Any type of lump or swelling (not just cancers)
  • Van Buchem disease type 2: A disease which is characterised by early onset osteoporosis
  • Wallenberg's Syndrome: A rare neurological condition caused by a stroke (involving the cerebellar artery) and resulting in symptoms such as facial paralysis or weakness on one side of body.

 

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