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Diseases » Bipolar disorder » Associated Diseases
 

Associated Conditions for Bipolar disorder

Excerpts on associated medical conditions for Bipolar disorder:

Bipolar Disorder: NIMH (Excerpt)

People with bipolar disorder often have abnormal thyroid gland function.5 Because too much or too little thyroid hormone alone can lead to mood and energy changes, it is important that thyroid levels are carefully monitored by a physician. (Source: excerpt from Bipolar Disorder: NIMH)

Bipolar Disorder: NIMH (Excerpt)

Alcohol and drug abuse are very common among people with bipolar disorder. Research findings suggest that many factors may contribute to these substance abuse problems, including self-medication of symptoms, mood symptoms either brought on or perpetuated by substance abuse, and risk factors that may influence the occurrence of both bipolar disorder and substance use disorders.24   Treatment for co-occurring substance abuse, when present, is an important part of the overall treatment plan.

Anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder, also may be common in people with bipolar disorder.25 ,26   Co-occurring anxiety disorders may respond to the treatments used for bipolar disorder, or they may require separate treatment. For more information on anxiety disorders, contact NIMH (see below). (Source: excerpt from Bipolar Disorder: NIMH)

Bipolar Disorder Research at the National Institute of Mental Health: NIMH (Excerpt)

The most common co-occurring illnesses among people with bipolar disorder are substance abuse disorders. Approximately 60 percent of people with bipolar disorder have drug and/or alcohol abuse or dependence problems the highest rate across all patients with major psychiatric illnesses. (Source: excerpt from Bipolar Disorder Research at the National Institute of Mental Health: NIMH)

Bipolar Disorder Research at the National Institute of Mental Health: NIMH (Excerpt)

Other research has indicated that certain anxiety disorders may co-occur with bipolar disorder. In one recent NIMH-supported study of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in people with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, almost all patients reported having experienced at least one traumatic event in their lifetime. (28)   While 43 percent of study participants met criteria for PTSD, only two percent had the diagnosis listed in their medical charts. The results suggest that PTSD commonly co-occurs with severe mental disorders. Routine screening for PTSD during medical visits would lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of this anxiety disorder, thus allowing the other co-occurring illness bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, etc. to be more effectively treated.

Another NIMH-funded study found a high co-occurrence of both PTSD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) among patients with bipolar disorder across a 12-month period. (29)   While the course of PTSD was independent of the mood disorder, the course of OCD frequently waxed and waned along with mood episodes. More research is needed to determine the nature of this apparent connection between OCD and bipolar disorder in some patients. (Source: excerpt from Bipolar Disorder Research at the National Institute of Mental Health: NIMH)

Bipolar Disorder Research at the National Institute of Mental Health: NIMH (Excerpt)

When the illness begins before or soon after puberty, it is often characterized by a continuous, rapid-cycling, irritable, and mixed symptom state that may co-occur with disruptive behavior disorders, particularly attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or conduct disorder (CD), or may have features of these disorders as initial symptoms. (Source: excerpt from Bipolar Disorder Research at the National Institute of Mental Health: NIMH)

Bipolar Disorder Research at the National Institute of Mental Health: NIMH (Excerpt)

A number of studies have found that among people with bipolar disorder, women are more likely than men to have a thyroid disorder. (1)  In addition, lithium treatment may cause low thyroid levels in some patients, particularly women, which may account for some depressive episodes that occur during treatment. Low thyroid levels also have been associated with rapid-cycling bipolar disorder. Thyroid hormone supplementation may be needed to restore normal thyroid levels. However, since too much or too little thyroid hormone alone can lead to mood and energy fluctuations, it is important that thyroid levels are carefully monitored in all patients with bipolar disorder. (Source: excerpt from Bipolar Disorder Research at the National Institute of Mental Health: NIMH)

List of associated medical conditions for Bipolar disorder:

The list of conditions mentioned by various sources as associated with Bipolar disorder includes:

About associated conditions for Bipolar disorder:

Associated conditions are those which appear statistically related, but do not have a clear cause or effect relationship. Whereas the complications are caused by Bipolar disorder, and underlying causes may be causes of Bipolar disorder, the following list shows associated conditions that simply appear with higher frequency in people who have Bipolar disorder. In some cases, there may be overlap between this list and risk factors for Bipolar disorder. People with Bipolar disorder may be more likely to get a condition on the list of associated conditions, or the reverse may be true, or both. Whether they are causes of, caused by, or simply coincidentally related to Bipolar disorder is not always clear. For general information, see Associated Condition Misdiagnosis.

 

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