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Diseases » Blood cancer » Glossary
 

Glossary for Blood cancer

  • ALL-Down syndrome: The presence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Down syndrome patients. These patients tend to have a poorer prognosis for the leukemia than patients without Down syndrome.
  • Acute adult T-Cell leukemia: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis. The acute subtype tends to progress rapidly and is the most prevalent form of the condition.
  • Acute basophilic leukaemia: A rare type of acute myeloid leukemia characterized by the presence of abnormal basophils.
  • Acute biphenotypic leukemia: A rare form of leukemia that has myeloid and lymphoid features.
  • Acute erythroleukemia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal blood cells (erythroblastic precursors) in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute leukaemia of ambiguous lineage: A term used to describe a type of leukemia (a blood cancer) where the leukemic cells cannot be determined as myeloid or lymphoid or where both types of cells are present.
  • Acute leukemia: An acute condition which affects a cell line of the blood which shows little or no differentiation
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia congenital sporadic aniridia: The rare association with a form of acute leukemia and congenital aniridia observed in a patient.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21 and type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 1: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 2: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, adult: Cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute lymphocytic leukemia: Most common child form of leukemia; can also affect adults especially over 65.
  • Acute megacaryoblastic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. More specifically, it involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 1: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of immature blood cells (blast cells).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 2: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 3: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 3 involves the proliferation of promyelocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 4: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 4 involves the rapid proliferation of myelocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 5: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 5 involves the rapid proliferation of monoblasts (immature precursors of monocytes) in particular.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 6: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 6 involves the proliferation of the immature precursors of red blood cells called erythroblasts.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 7: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 7 involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes) in particular.
  • Acute myelocytic leukemia: A cancer of the blood-forming tissues of the bone marrow involving the proliferation of cells that normally develop into infection-fighting cells such as eosinophils, monocytes, basophils and neutrophils. The cancerous cells replace the normal bone marrow cells. Acute leukemia involves a more rapid proliferation of cancer cells compared to chronic forms of leukemia.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to alkylating agent: The use of alkylating agents to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to topoisomerase type II inhibitor: The use of topoisomerase type II inhibitors to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, therapy related: Certain cancer therapies can result in the development of leukemia in some patients. These therapies includes topoisomerase type II inhibitors and alkylating agents.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia, adult: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute non lymphoblastic leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets. It is one of the most common forms of leukemia in adults but can occur in children.
  • Acute promyelocytic leukemia: A rare bone marrow cancer characterized by a lack of mature blood cells and excessive amounts of immature blood cells (promyelocytes).
  • Adult T-Cell leukemia: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis.
  • Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma: Rare cancer of the immune system T-cells.
  • Aggressive NK-cell leukaemia: An aggressive form of blood cancer involving the rapid proliferation of natural killer (NK) cells.
  • Aleukemic leukemia cutis: A rare form of leukemia where the skin is involved before the leukemic cells appear in the blood. It is usually an early sign of leukemia.
  • B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A slow progressing disease involving cancerous B-cell lymphocytes which take over the healthy cells in the lymph nodes. B-cells help the body to fight infections so when the disease becomes more advanced, the body is less able to fight infection as there are fewer healthy, functioning B-cells.
  • B-cell prolymphocytic leukaemia: A rare type of leukemia involving a proliferation of immature white blood cells (prolymphocytes - B-cells).
  • Blast crisis: The final phase of chronic myeloid leukemia which has a high mortality rate. Myeloid leukemia is a form of cancer where the bone marrow makes too many myeloid cells (granulocytes and their precursors) in the bone marrow which accumulates in the blood and eventually invades various parts of the body. The three phases of the condition are the chronic phase, aggressive phase and finally the blast crisis. A blast crisis is occurs when over 30% of the cells in the blood or bone marrow are immature blood cells (blast cells). Patients in the final stage of leukemia are more prone to relapses following treatment.
  • Blood conditions: Conditions that affect the blood
  • Bone Marrow Conditions: Medical conditions affecting the bone marrow
  • Cancer: Abnormal overgrowth of body cells.
  • Chloromyeloma: A rare type of tumor that develops from myeloid cells (type of immature white blood cell) and tends to usually have a greenish color. The tumor is essentially a localized solid collection of leukemic cells that occurs outside the bone marrow. It can occur in many parts of the body such as the chest, vertebrae, pelvis, skin, lymph nodes and parts of the skull. On rare occasions, it can occur in various organs such as the heart and brain. The tumor can occur as a primary condition or may be associated with cancerous conditions such as acute leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia. Symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 1: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q13.3
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 2: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 13q14.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 3: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 9q34.1.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 4: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p25.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 5: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q24.1.
  • Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia: A rare form of leukemia characterized by excessive levels of mature neutrophils.
  • Chronic adult T-Cell leukemia: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis. The acute form tends to progress relatively slowly and generally responds better to treatment than the other subtypes.
  • Chronic leukemia: Leukemia in which the cell line is well differentiated, usually B lymphocytes.
  • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body.
  • Chronic myelogenous leukemia: A slow-growing cancer of the white blood cells where the bone marrow makes too many white blood cells which eventually invade various parts of the body.
  • Chronic myeloid leukemia: Type of leukemia mostly in adults; rarely in children.
  • Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of certain blood cells - myelocytes and monocytes. The proliferation is slower than in acute forms of the disease.
  • Deafness -- lymphoedema -- leukemia: A rare syndrome characterized by deafness, early-onset leukemia and lymphoedema in the lower legs.
  • Extramedullary Myeloid Tumor: A rare type of tumor that develops from myeloid cells (type of immature white blood cell) and tends to usually have a greenish color. The tumor is essentially a localized solid collection of leukemic cells that occurs outside the bone marrow. It can occur in many parts of the body such as the chest, vertebrae, pelvis, skin, lymph nodes and parts of the skull. On rare occasions, it can occur in various organs such as the heart and brain. The tumor can occur as a primary condition or may be associated with cancerous conditions such as acute leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia. Symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor.
  • Familial platelet syndrome with predisposition to acute myelogenous leukemia: A rare inherited blood disorder that is associated with an increased risk of myeloid malignancies - especially acute myelogenous leukemia.
  • Fatigue: Excessive tiredness or weakness.
  • Gum bleeding: abnormal bleeding from the gums may be mostly due to nutritional deficiencies or blood dyscrasias
  • Hairy cell leukemia: A chronic leukemia which causes an excess of abnormal mononuclear cells which appear hair like under microscopy
  • Human T Cell Leukemia Virus 1: A type of retrovirus that can infect a type of white blood cell called T cells and result in leukemia. The infection can be spread by sexual contact, breast feeding, transfusions and sharing syringes.
  • Human T-cell leukemia viruses type 2: A type of retrovirus that can infect a type of white blood cell called T cells and result in leukemia. The infection can be spread by sexual contact, breast feeding, transfusions and sharing syringes.
  • Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer that occurs in children and involves the proliferation of immature precursors of certain blood cells - myelocytes and monocytes. The proliferation is slower than in acute forms of the disease.
  • Large granular lymphocyte leukemia: A form of leukemia characterized by an increased number of circulating granular lymphocytes.
  • Leukemia: Cancer of the blood cells, usually white blood cells.
  • Leukemia subleukemic: A classification of leukemia where the white blood count is normal (less than 15,000) but there are abnormal white blood cells present in the peripheral blood.
  • Leukemia, B-cell, chronic: A slow growing cancer of the immune system involving proliferation of B-cells.
  • Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L1: Acute lymphocytic leukemia is a cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are three main subtypes (L1, L2 and L3) which are differentiated by the appearance of the cancerous cells: L1 is characterized by small, uniform cancer cells with a round nucleus and very little cytoplasm. L1 has a better prognosis than L2. L1 is the main form in children (about 85%) but is less common in adults (about 30%).
  • Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L2: Acute lymphocytic leukemia is a cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are three main subtypes (L1, L2 and L3) which are differentiated by the appearance of the cancerous cells: L2 is characterized by larger cells, an irregular-shaped nucleus, more cytoplasm and significant variation between cells. L2 has a poorer prognosis than L1. L2 is the main form in adults (about 65%) but is less common in children (about 15%).
  • Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L3: Acute lymphocytic leukemia is a relatively aggressive cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are three main subtypes (L1, L2 and L3) which are differentiated by the appearance of the cancerous cells. L3 is quite uncommon but is very similar to Burkitt's lymphoma - in fact, they may be considered the same disease with different manifestations.
  • Leukemia, Monocytic, Acute: A cancer of the blood-forming tissues of the bone marrow involving the proliferation of a type of infection-fighting white blood cell called a monocyte. Acute leukemia involves a more rapid proliferation of cancer cells compared to chronic forms of leukemia.
  • Leukemia, Myeloid: A form of blood cancer that causes a proliferation of the precursors or immature red blood cells, platelets and certain white blood cells such as granulocytes and monocytes.
  • Leukemia, Myeloid, Aggressive-Phase: Myeloid leukemia is a form of cancer where the bone marrow makes too many myeloid cells (granulocytes and their precursors) in the bone marrow which accumulates in the blood and eventually invades various parts of the body. The aggressive phase of myeloid leukemia follows the chronic form and is a sign that the condition is progressing more rapidly to a blast crisis which is the final stage of leukemia.
  • Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic: A slow-growing cancer where the bone marrow makes too many myeloid cells (granulocytes and their precursors) in the bone marrow which accumulates in the blood and eventually invades various parts of the body.
  • Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic-Phase: Myeloid leukemia is a form of cancer where the bone marrow makes too many myeloid cells (granulocytes and their precursors) in the bone marrow which accumulates in the blood and eventually invades various parts of the body. The chronic phase of myeloid leukemia usually involves few if any symptoms. This is the early stage of the disease and without treatment it generally progresses to the accelerated phase of the condition. The majority of patients diagnosed with myeloid leukemia are diagnosed during the chronic phase.
  • Leukemia, Myeloid, Philadelphia-Negative: Acute lymphocytic leukemia is a relatively aggressive cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. The Philadelphia negative form of the condition is not associated with a genetic mutation. It is distinguished from the positive form by the clinical course which is initially the same but progresses to eventual bone marrow failure without a distinct increase in blast cells. Other differences include poor response to chemotherapy, lower white blood cell counts, greater monocytosis, less basophilia, lower bone marrow myeloid to erythroid ratio and increased likelihood of developing thrombocytopenia. Philadelphia negative patients also tend to be older and median survival rates tend to be poorer.
  • Leukemia, Myeloid, Philadelphia-Positive: A relatively aggressive cancer of the cells that produce white blood cells. The Philadelphia form of myeloid leukemia carries a relatively poor prognosis. It involves an acquired genetic mutation which results in the production tyrosine kinase which causes too many abnormal white blood cells to be produced which results in a shortage of other blood cell types. Treatment is aimed at inhibiting the production of tyrosine kinase.
  • Leukemia, T-Cell: A form of blood cancer characterized by the proliferation of cancerous T-cells which make up part of the body's immune system. The exact symptoms and progression vary depending on the subtype involved.
  • Leukemia, T-Cell, Acute: A form of blood cancer characterized by the proliferation of cancerous T-cells which make up part of the body's immune system. The exact symptoms and progression vary depending on the subtype involved. The acute form involves a rapid proliferation of cancerous T-cells and hence a more rapid disease progression and increased severity of symptoms.
  • Leukemia, T-cell, chronic: Cancer of blood cells called T-cells which form part of the immune system.
  • Leukemia, mast-cell: A very aggressive form of leukemia - a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia. The cancer can in rare cases develop from chronic myeloid leukemia or systemic mastocytosis but generally develops on its own.
  • Lymphoblastic lymphoma: A cancer of the lymph system which usually involves immature T-lymphocytes and sometimes B-lymphocytes. The cancer usually affects the mediastinum (between the lungs), bone marrow, brain and spinal cord.
  • Lymphocytic leukemia: A condition characterized by the proliferation of lymphoid tissues
  • Lymphoma: Cancer involving lymph nodes and the immune system.
  • Malaise: General feelings of discomfort or being ill-at-ease.
  • Metastatic blood cancer: Cancer cells can "break away" from a primary tumor, enter lymphatic and blood vessels, circulate through the bloodstream, and settle down to grow within normal tissues elsewhere in the body.
  • Multiple Myeloma: A rare malignant cancer that occurs in the bone marrow. More common in skull, spine, rib cage, pelvis and legs.
  • Myelogenous leukemia: A condition which is characterized proliferation of myeloid tissue and the abnormal increase in granulocytes
  • Myeloid Sarcoma: A rare type of tumor that develops from myeloid cells (type of immature white blood cell) and tends to usually have a greenish color. The tumor is essentially a localized solid collection of leukemic cells that occurs outside the bone marrow. It can occur in many parts of the body such as the chest, vertebrae, pelvis, skin, lymph nodes and parts of the skull. On rare occasions, it can occur in various organs such as the heart and brain. The tumor can occur as a primary condition or may be associated with cancerous conditions such as acute leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia. Symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor.
  • Myeloma: A primary malignancy of the plasma cells
  • Myelomatous polyneuropathy: Polyneuropathy may be associated with multiple myeloma which is a tumour of the plasma cells.
  • Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A type of lymphoma, a cancer affecting lymph nodes and the immune system.
  • Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloid leukemia: A form of leukemia.
  • Plasma cell leukemia: A form of leukemia characterized by the proliferation of plasma cells in the peripheral blood system. The prognosis is generally poor for this usually aggressive condition.
  • Plasmacytoma anaplastic: A type of cancer from plasma cells where the plasma cells multiply uncontrollably. It can occur in the bone or in soft tissue. If the cancer is located in only one part of the body it is called a solitary plasmacytoma and if there are multiple sites it is called a multiple myeloma. Symptoms will vary depending on the location of the cancer.
  • Prolymphocytic leukemia: A very rare type of leukemia involving a proliferation of immature white blood cells (prolymphocytes - T-cells).
  • Richter syndrome: A rare but serious form of acute adult leukemia. The disease occurs when chronic lymphocytic leukemia transforms into diffuse large cell lymphoma which is a fast-growing form of lymphoma. The condition tends to be more common in older adults.
  • Shortness of breath: The feeling of being short of breath
  • Smoldering adult T-Cell leukemia: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis. The smoldering form tends to progress even slower than the chronic form and responds the best to treatment.
  • T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Cancer of particular white blood cells called T-cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets.
  • T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia: A form of cancer which causes proliferation of T-cells in the intermediate stage of development.
  • Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia: A rare disorder involving malignancy of the lymph and blood cells.
  • Weakness: Symptoms causing weakness of the body

 

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