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What is Botulism food poisoning?

What is Botulism food poisoning?

  • Botulism food poisoning: Extremely dangerous food poisoning requiring medical attention, but not always recognized because of its non-abdominal symptoms.
  • Botulism food poisoning: A species of anaerobic, gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria in the family Clostridiaceae that produces proteins with characteristic neurotoxicity. It is the etiologic agent of BOTULISM in humans, wild fowl, HORSES; and CATTLE. Seven subtypes (sometimes called antigenic types, or strains) exist, each producing a different botulinum toxin (BOTULINUM TOXINS). The organism and its spores are widely distributed in nature.
    Source - Diseases Database
  • Botulism food poisoning: food poisoning from ingesting botulin; not infectious; affects the CNS; can be fatal if not treated promptly.
    Source - WordNet 2.1

Botulism food poisoning is listed as a "rare disease" by the Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This means that Botulism food poisoning, or a subtype of Botulism food poisoning, affects less than 200,000 people in the US population.
Source - National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Ophanet, a consortium of European partners, currently defines a condition rare when it affects 1 person per 2,000. They list Botulism food poisoning as a "rare disease".
Source - Orphanet

Botulism food poisoning: Introduction

Types of Botulism food poisoning:

Types of Botulism food poisoning:

Broader types of Botulism food poisoning:

How many people get Botulism food poisoning?

Incidence (annual) of Botulism food poisoning: 154 annual cases notified in USA 1999 including 23 foodborne, 92 infant, and 39 other (MMWR 1999)
Incidence Rate of Botulism food poisoning: approx 1 in 1,766,233 or 0.00% or 153 people in USA [about data]
Prevalance of Botulism food poisoning: The incidence of the disease is low, but the disease is of considerable concern because of its high mortality rate if not treated immediately and properly. Most of the 10 to 30 outbreaks that are reported annually in the United States are associated with inadequately processed, home-canned foods, but occasionally commercially produced foods have been involved in outbreaks (Source: FDA Bad Bug Book) ... In the United States an average of 110 cases of botulism are reported each year. Of these, approximately 25% are foodborne, 72% are infant botulism, and the rest are wound botulism. Outbreaks of foodborne botulism involving two or more persons occur most years and usually caused by eating contaminated home-canned foods. The number of cases of foodborne and infant botulism has changed little in recent years, but wound botulism has increased because of the use of black-tar heroin, especially in California. (Source: excerpt from Botulism General: DBMD) ... In 1999, 174 cases of botulism were reported to the CDC. Of these, 26 were foodborne, 107 were infant botulism, and 41 were cases of wound botulism. (Source: excerpt from Botulism: DBMD)
Incidence of Botulism food poisoning: The incidence of the disease is low, but the mortality rate is high if not treated immediately and properly. There are generally between 10 to 30 outbreaks a year in the United States. (Source: FDA Bad Bug Book)

How serious is Botulism food poisoning?

Complications of Botulism food poisoning: see complications of Botulism food poisoning
Prognosis of Botulism food poisoning: Death can result from respiratory failure. About 5% die. Recovery takes months. Those who survive may have fatigue and shortness of breath for years. (Source: excerpt from Botulism: DBMD)

What causes Botulism food poisoning?

Causes of Botulism food poisoning: see causes of Botulism food poisoning
Cause of Botulism food poisoning: Eating contaminated food, even only a very small amount.
Causes of Botulism food poisoning: The types of foods involved in botulism vary according to food preservation and eating habits in different regions. Any food that is conducive to outgrowth and toxin production, that when processed allows spore survival, and is not subsequently heated before consumption can be associated with botulism. Almost any type of food that is not very acidic (pH above 4.6) can support growth and toxin production by C. botulinum. Botulinal toxin has been demonstrated in a considerable variety of foods, such as canned corn, peppers, green beans, soups, beets, asparagus, mushrooms, ripe olives, spinach, tuna fish, chicken and chicken livers and liver pate, and luncheon meats, ham, sausage, stuffed eggplant, lobster, and smoked and salted fish. (Source: FDA Bad Bug Book) ... A potent neurotoxin produced from Clostridium botulinum, an anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium. (Source: excerpt from Botulism: DBMD) ... Foodborne botulism follows ingestion of toxin produced in food by C. botulinum. The most frequent source is home-canned foods, prepared in an unsafe manner. (Source: excerpt from Botulism: DBMD)
Risk factors for Botulism food poisoning: see risk factors for Botulism food poisoning

What are the symptoms of Botulism food poisoning?

Symptoms of Botulism food poisoning: see symptoms of Botulism food poisoning

Complications of Botulism food poisoning: see complications of Botulism food poisoning

Incubation period for Botulism food poisoning: 18 to 36 hours (or longer)

Incubation period for Botulism food poisoning: In foodborne botulism, symptoms generally begin 18 to 36 hours after eating a contaminated food, but they can occur as early as 6 hours or as late as 10 days. (Source: excerpt from Botulism General: DBMD)

Can anyone else get Botulism food poisoning?

More information: see contagiousness of Botulism food poisoning

Botulism food poisoning: Testing

Diagnostic testing: see tests for Botulism food poisoning.

Misdiagnosis: see misdiagnosis and Botulism food poisoning.

How is it treated?

Doctors and Medical Specialists for Botulism food poisoning: Emergency Medical Physician, Gastroenterologist, Infectious Disease Specialist ; see also doctors and medical specialists for Botulism food poisoning.
Treatments for Botulism food poisoning: see treatments for Botulism food poisoning
Prevention of Botulism food poisoning: see prevention of Botulism food poisoning
Research for Botulism food poisoning: see research for Botulism food poisoning

Name and Aliases of Botulism food poisoning

Main name of condition: Botulism food poisoning

Class of Condition for Botulism food poisoning: bacterial

Other names or spellings for Botulism food poisoning:

Clostridium botulinum, Botulism, botulism, Foodborne botulism (subtype), Infant botulism (subtype), Wound botulism (subtype)

Clostridium botulinum, Botulism Source - Diseases Database

Foodborne botulism (subtype), Infant botulism (subtype), Wound botulism (subtype)
Source - Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Botulism food poisoning: Related Conditions

Research the causes of these diseases that are similar to, or related to, Botulism food poisoning:

 

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