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Treatments for Chemical-related eczema

Treatment List for Chemical-related eczema

The list of treatments mentioned in various sources for Chemical-related eczema includes the following list. Always seek professional medical advice about any treatment or change in treatment plans.

  • Treatment is aimed at reducing itching and inflammation. Identification and avoidance of triggering chemicals is the most effective treatment but sometimes the but if symptoms do occur various measures may be utilised: moisturising the skin stops it from drying out, corticosteroid creams reduce inflammation (various strengths may be used depending on the severity of the condition) and antihistamines alleviate itching. Severe outbreaks may require oral corticosteroids. UV light therapy may benefit some cases. Newer topical medications such as tacrolimus and pimecrolimus may be used in some cases but their link to certain cancers is still under scrutiny. An example of a detailed treatment plan is outlined below but obviously these requirements may vary depending on various individual factors:
  • Steps for Managing Eczema:
  • Bathe only once every 1-2 days - over-bathing can dry the skin.
  • Use bath oil to help moisturise skin e.g. Dermaveen, Hamilton's Alpha Ker or QV
  • If skin is weeping, avoid bathing with other people to reduce risk of infection
  • Oatmeal baths may sooth the skin - plain rolled oats in a stocking placed in the bath may be used instead of commercial oatmeal based bath products.
  • Keep the nails short and wear a covering over the hands (gloves or socks) to avoid night-time scratching as the patient is often unaware that they are scratching
  • Using low-allergenic washing powders
  • Wear cotton clothing as other materials increase sweating and rubbing on the skin
  • Moisturise twice a day. It may take some experimentation to find a cream that doesn't irritate the skin. Avoid creams with mineral oils. Commonly used brands include: Alpha Keri, Cetaphil, QV, Dermaveen and Hamiltons
  • Oils such as olive oil (extra-virgin) may be used as a moisturizer. Nut oils may be problematic for some people as they may contain protein allergens
  • A topical cream called Pimecrolimus may be used to treat eczema - it is non-steroidal and doesn't cause thinning of the skin. Strong steroid-based topical creams may be needed for more resistant patches.
  • Use 1-3 Condy's crystals in the bath to dry out weeping eczema lesions - NB these crystals can stain porcelain baths and towels pink. Very red dry skin may benefit from using QV Flare Up Bath Oil.
  • Use topical antibacterial cream for infected eczema - oral antibiotics may be recommended in more severe cases.
  • Avoid environments that are excessively hot, cold or dry as they can exacerbate skin symptoms
  • Avoid any food, chemical or other triggers that may cause or exacerbate symptoms
  • Skin lesions may be wrapped in cotton bandages to reduce scratching and allow topical moisturizers and steroid creams to stay on the skin and absorb better
  • Avoid or reduce exposure to allergens such as dust mites and moulds. Measures may include: dust mite protective bedding; wash bedding in hot water; air mattress on hot or dry days; dust room with a wet rag; use a dust mite filter on the vaccum cleaner and vacuum regularly; use mould resistant paint on bathroom walls; remove obvious mould which can grow in dark, warm, damp areas; be aware of other sources of mould e.g. pot plants, grasses, compost and water-based air conditioners
  • Treat acute hives with an antihistamine such as Zyrtec
  • Immunotherapy may be used to desensitise and individual who has a specific allergy
  • Treatment is aimed at reducing itching and inflammation. Identification and avoidance of triggering chemicals is the most effective treatment but sometimes the but if symptoms do occur various measures may be utilised: moisturising the skin stops it from drying out, corticosteroid creams reduce inflammation (various strengths may be used depending on the severity of the condition) and antihistamines alleviate itching. Severe outbreaks may require oral corticosteroids. UV light therapy may benefit some cases. Newer topical medications such as tacrolimus and pimecrolimus may be used in some cases but their link to certain cancers is still under scrutiny. An example of a detailed treatment plan is outlined below but obviously these requirements may vary depending on various individual factors:
    • Steps for Managing Eczema:
      • Bathe only once every 1-2 days - over-bathing can dry the skin
      • Use bath oil to help moisturise skin e.g. Dermaveen, Hamilton's Alpha Ker or QV
      • If skin is weeping, avoid bathing with other people to reduce risk of infection
      • Oatmeal baths may sooth the skin - plain rolled oats in a stocking placed in the bath may be used instead of commercial oatmeal based bath products
      • Keep the nails short and wear a covering over the hands (gloves or socks) to avoid night-time scratching as the patient is often unaware that they are scratching
      • Using low-allergenic washing powders
      • Wear cotton clothing as other materials increase sweating and rubbing on the skin
      • Moisturise twice a day. It may take some experimentation to find a cream that doesn't irritate the skin. Avoid creams with mineral oils. Commonly used brands include: Alpha Keri, Cetaphil, QV, Dermaveen and Hamiltons
      • Oils such as olive oil (extra-virgin) may be used as a moisturizer. Nut oils may be problematic for some people as they may contain protein allergens
    • Topical steroids in acute exacerbations to control symptoms. Avoid high strength steroids on the face and neck
    • Topical immunomodulators - Pimecrolimus and Tacrolimus - may be used as an alternative to topical steroids, but long term side effects have not been fully elucidated
      • Use 1-3 Condy's crystals in the bath to dry out weeping eczema lesions - NB these crystals can stain porcelain baths and towels pink. Very red dry skin may benefit from using QV Flare Up Bath Oil
      • Use topical antibacterial cream for infected eczema - oral antibiotics may be recommended in more severe cases
      • Avoid environments that are excessively hot, cold or dry as they can exacerbate skin symptoms
      • Avoid any food, chemical or other triggers that may cause or exacerbate symptoms
      • Skin lesions may be wrapped in cotton bandages to reduce scratching and allow topical moisturizers and steroid creams to stay on the skin and absorb better
      • Immunotherapy may be used to desensitise and individual who has a specific allergy

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