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Diseases » Coma » Summary
 

What is Coma?

What is Coma?

  • Coma: Prolonged unconsciousness.
  • Coma: profound state of unconsciousness associated with depressed cerebral activity from which the individual cannot be aroused; coma generally occurs when there is dysfunction or injury involving both cerebral hemispheres or the brain stem.
    Source - Diseases Database
  • Coma: a state of deep and often prolonged unconsciousness; usually the result of disease or injury.
    Source - WordNet 2.1

Coma is listed as a "rare disease" by the Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This means that Coma, or a subtype of Coma, affects less than 200,000 people in the US population.
Source - National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Coma: Introduction

Types of Coma:

Broader types of Coma:

How serious is Coma?

Complications of Coma: see complications of Coma
Prognosis of Coma: The outcome for coma and vegetative state depends on the cause and on the location, severity, and extent of neurological damage: outcomes range from recovery to death. People may emerge from a coma with a combination of physical, intellectual, and psychological difficulties that need special attention. Recovery usually occurs gradually, with patients acquiring more and more ability to respond. Some patients never progress beyond very basic responses, but many recover full awareness. Patients recovering from coma require close medical supervision. A coma rarely lasts more than 2 to 4 weeks. Some patients may regain a degree of awareness after vegetative state. Others may remain in a vegetative state for years or even decades. The most common cause of death for a person in a vegetative state is infection such as pneumonia. (Source: excerpt from NINDS Coma Information Page: NINDS)

What causes Coma?

Causes of Coma: see causes of Coma
Risk factors for Coma: see risk factors for Coma

What are the symptoms of Coma?

Symptoms of Coma: see symptoms of Coma

Complications of Coma: see complications of Coma

Duration of Coma: often short; rarely more than 2-4 weeks

Coma: Testing

Diagnostic testing: see tests for Coma.

Misdiagnosis: see misdiagnosis and Coma.

How is it treated?

Doctors and Medical Specialists for Coma: Neurologist ; see also doctors and medical specialists for Coma.
Treatments for Coma: see treatments for Coma
Research for Coma: see research for Coma

Society issues for Coma


Hospitalization statistics for Coma: The following are statistics from various sources about hospitalizations and Coma:

  • 0.02% (2,499) of hospital consultant episodes were for somnolence, stupor and coma in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 82% of hospital consultant episodes for somnolence, stupor and coma required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 47% of hospital consultant episodes for somnolence, stupor and coma were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 53% of hospital consultant episodes for somnolence, stupor and coma were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 92% of hospital consultant episodes for somnolence, stupor and coma required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • more statistics...»

Organs Affected by Coma:

Organs and body systems related to Coma include:

Name and Aliases of Coma

Main name of condition: Coma

Other names or spellings for Coma:

Drowsiness, Narcosis, Sedation, Somnolence, Unconscious state, Unconsciousness, Reduced level of consciousness Source - Diseases Database

Comatoseness
Source - WordNet 2.1

Cogan's syndrome, type II, Congenital Oculomotor Apraxia, Saccade initiation failure, congenital, Apraxia, oculomotor, Cogan type
Source - Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Coma: Related Conditions

Research the causes of these diseases that are similar to, or related to, Coma:

 

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