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Diseases » Cyclosporiasis » Contagiousness
 

Is Cyclosporiasis Contagious?

Infection and Cyclosporiasis

Cyclosporiasis is most likely not transmitted from person to person based on the lifecycle of cyclospora. Cyclosporiasis is caused by eating or drinking something contaminated with cyclospora from feces.

Contagion summary:

Cyclospora is spread by people ingesting something, for example, water or food that was contaminated with infected stool. For example, outbreaks of cyclosporiasis have been linked to various types of fresh produce. Cyclospora needs time (days or weeks) after being passed in a bowel movement to become infectious. Therefore, it is unlikely that Cyclospora is passed directly from one person to another. It is unknown whether animals can be infected and pass infection to people. (Source: excerpt from Cyclospora Infection: DPD)

Discussion about Contagion of Cyclosporiasis:

Foodborne Infections General: DBMD (Excerpt)

For example, in 1996, the parasite Cyclospora suddenly appeared as a cause of diarrheal illness related to Guatemalan raspberries.  These berries had just started to be grown commercially in Guatemala, and somehow became contaminated in the field there with this unusual parasite. (Source: excerpt from Foodborne Infections General: DBMD)

Facts About Cyclospora: CDC-OC (Excerpt)

Cyclospora is spread by people who ingest water or food that has been contaminated with infected stool. Because Cyclospora needs time (days or weeks) after being passed in a bowel movement to become infectious, it's unlikely that Cyclospora is passed directly from one person to another. It is unknown whether animals can be infected and pass infection to people. (Source: excerpt from Facts About Cyclospora: CDC-OC)

About contagion and contagiousness:

Contagion and contagiousness refers to how easily the spread of Cyclosporiasis is possible from one person to another. Other words for contagion include "infection", "infectiousness", "transmission" or "transmissability". Contagiousness has nothing to do with genetics or inheriting diseases from parents. For an overview of contagion, see Introduction to Contagion.

 

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