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Diseases » Depression » Associated Diseases
 

Associated Conditions for Depression

Excerpts on associated medical conditions for Depression:

Let's Talk About Depression: NIMH (Excerpt)

A lot of depressed people, especially teenagers, also have problems with alcohol or other drugs. (Alcohol is a drug, too.) Sometimes the depression comes first and people try drugs as a way to escape it. (In the long run, drugs or alcohol just make things worse!) Other times, the alcohol or other drug use comes first, and depression is caused by:

  • the drug itself, or
  • withdrawal from it, or
  • the problems that substance use causes.

And sometimes you can't tell which came first...the important point is that when you have both of these problems, the sooner you get treatment, the better. Either problem can make the other worse and lead to bigger trouble, like addiction or flunking school. You need to be honest about both problems -- first with yourself and then with someone who can help you get into treatment...it's the only way to really get better and stay better. (Source: excerpt from Let's Talk About Depression: NIMH)

Depression Research: NIMH (Excerpt)

Depression frequently co-occurs with a variety of other physical illnesses, including heart disease, stroke, cancer, and diabetes, and also can increase the risk for subsequent physical illness, disability, and premature death. Depression in the context of physical illness, however, is often unrecognized and untreated. Furthermore, depression can impair the ability to seek and stay on treatment for other medical illnesses. NIMH research suggests that early diagnosis and treatment of depression in patients with other physical illnesses may help improve overall health outcome. (Source: excerpt from Depression Research: NIMH)

If You're Over 65 and Feeling Depressed Treatment Brings New Hope: NIMH (Excerpt)

Depression occurs at higher than average rates in heart attack and cancer patients, persons with diabetes, and post-stroke patients. Untreated depression can interfere with the patient's ability to follow the necessary treatment regimen or to participate in a rehabilitation program. It may also increase impairment from the medical disorder and impede its improvment. (Source: excerpt from If You're Over 65 and Feeling Depressed Treatment Brings New Hope: NIMH)

If You're Over 65 and Feeling Depressed Treatment Brings New Hope: NIMH (Excerpt)

Depression also occurs more frequently in persons with other psychiatric disorders, especially anxiety disorders. In such cases, detection of depression can result in more effective treatment and a better outcome for the patient. (Source: excerpt from If You're Over 65 and Feeling Depressed Treatment Brings New Hope: NIMH)

If You're Over 65 and Feeling Depressed Treatment Brings New Hope: NIMH (Excerpt)

Substance abuse disorders (including alcohol and prescription drugs) frequently co-exist with depression. Substance use must be discontinued in order to clarify the diagnosis and maximize the effectiveness of psychiatric interventions. Additional treatment is necessary if the depression remains after the substance use and withdrawal effects have ended. (Source: excerpt from If You're Over 65 and Feeling Depressed Treatment Brings New Hope: NIMH)

List of associated medical conditions for Depression:

The list of conditions mentioned by various sources as associated with Depression includes:

Depression as a risk factor:

Another type of associated condition is one for which Depression is itself a risk factor. The conditions for which Depression is listed as a risk factor includes:

About associated conditions for Depression:

Associated conditions are those which appear statistically related, but do not have a clear cause or effect relationship. Whereas the complications are caused by Depression, and underlying causes may be causes of Depression, the following list shows associated conditions that simply appear with higher frequency in people who have Depression. In some cases, there may be overlap between this list and risk factors for Depression. People with Depression may be more likely to get a condition on the list of associated conditions, or the reverse may be true, or both. Whether they are causes of, caused by, or simply coincidentally related to Depression is not always clear. For general information, see Associated Condition Misdiagnosis.

 

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