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Diseases » Depression » Glossary
 

Glossary for Depression

  • 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A rare genetic disorder caused by the absence of a small portion of genetic material. A small section of chromosome 22 is missing at a location called q11.2. Chromosome 22 is one of 23 pairs of chromosomes that exist in humans.
  • ACTH Deficiency: A rare endocrine disorder involving a lack of ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) and low levels of cortisol and steroid hormones.
  • ADD: Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) is a mental and behavioral disorder characterized by behavioral problems such as hyperactivity, inattention, concentration difficulty, and other mental symptoms. The related description Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) may be a more modern description of the disease.

    Misdiagnosis of ADD is a well-known controversy in the sense that cases of hyperactivity in children may be over-diagnosed. There is a tendency for parents to seek and doctors to prescribe the drug Ritalin even in cases where the diagnosis of ADD or ADHD may be incorrect. Alternative diagnoses include normal child behavior (i.e. just an active child), food intolerances, or other behavioral disorders (see misdiagnosis of ADD).

    On the other hand, ADD is under-diagnosed in adults, with a large number of adults having ADD without knowing it; see misdiagnosis of Adult ADD.

  • ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a mental and behavioral disorder characterized by behavioral problems such as hyperactivity, inattention, concentration difficulty, and other mental symptoms. Typically, ADHD and associated hyperactivity is known as a childhood disorder, although ADD/ADHD in adults is known to be under-diagnosed. It is distinguished from Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) which has a reduced focus on hyperactivity type symptoms.
  • Aceruloplasminemia: A rare, recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a lack of ceruloplasmin in the blood. The lack of ceruloplasmin results in abnormal iron use in the body and leads to iron deposits in various body tissues such as the brain, pancreas and liver. The iron overload results a neurodegeneration (ataxia, dementia and extrapyramidal disorders) and diabetes. Patients with only a partial absence of ceruloplasmin are often asymptomatic.
  • Acitretin- Teratogenic Agent: Reports indicate that the use of Acitretin during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. Acitretin should not be taken by women who are pregnant or planning on becoming pregnant.
  • Acne: Pimples and blackheads on the face and skin.
  • Acute Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Chemical poisoning -- Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha: Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha is an ingredient used in certain pesticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- Triforine: Triforine is an ingredient used in certain herbicides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute VE: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute intermittent porphyria: A rare metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency in the porphobilinogen deaminase enzyme which results in a build-up of porphyrins or its precursors in the body. Using certain drugs or eating certain foods can trigger the symptoms of the condition.
  • Acute stress disorder: An acute anxiety state
  • Addiction: Any of various addictions to substances or activities.
  • Addison's Disease: A rare progressive hormonal disorder characterized by insufficient production of certain hormones called adrenal corticosteroids.
  • Adhesive abuse: Adhesive abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Adhesives include household glues, rubber cement and model aeroplane glue. These adhesives can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Adhesive addiction: Adhesive addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse adhesives (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Adhesives includes household glue, rubber cement and model airplane glue.
  • Adjustment Disorder: This is a maladaptive reaction to identifiable stress
  • Adolescent conditions: Symptoms that are evident due to puberty
  • Adolescent depression: It isnot unusual for young people to experience "the blues" or feel low occasionally. Adolescence is always an unsettling time, with the many physical, emotional, psychological and social changes that accompany this stage of life.
  • Adrenal Cancer: A malignant cancer that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids. Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal Cortex Diseases: Diseases of the adrenal cortex. Examples includes Addison's disease, Cushing's syndrome and adrenal fatigue.
  • Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: A tumor that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids.
  • Adrenal adenoma, familial: A benign tumor that develops in the adrenal gland and tends to run in families. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids . Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal disorders: Disorders affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal gland hyperfunction: Excessive activity of the adrenal gland which causes excessive production of one or more adrenal hormones (aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine). The increased adrenal gland activity may be caused by an adrenal gland tumor or by excessive stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal gland hypofunction: Reduced adrenal gland activity due to damage to the adrenal gland or lack of stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal hyperplasia: A group of disorder that occur when there is a problem in the process of making adrenal corticosteroids.
  • Adrenal incidentaloma: A tumor of the adrenal gland that is discovered incidentally while performing an imaging examination for reasons other than an adrenal tumor. The tumor may be asymptomatic or can causes excessive secretion of adrenal hormones and resulting symptoms. The tumor may also be malignant or benign.
  • Adrenal insufficiency: Where there is insufficient secretion of hormones secreted from the adrenal glands
  • Adrenocortical carcinoma: A condition which is characterized by malignancy which affects the adrenocortex.
  • Adult ADHD: Adult ADHD, (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) is a common neurobehavioral developmental disorder with an onset in childhood that continues into adulthood. Children do not simply grow out of ADHD, as is often believed. Just the opposite is commonly true - the symptoms of ADHD often get worse as a child grows into adulthood. The predominant behaviors of adult ADHD are the same as in children and include:
    • Inattentiveness
    • Hyperactivity
    • Impulsivity

    These behaviors result in difficulties with:

    • Concentration
    • Remaining focused on a task or activity
    • Controlling behavior
    • Hyperactivity or over-activity

    The symptoms of adult ADHD can be treated, but there currently is no cure for the disorder. Most people with ADHD can be successfully treated and lead normal, productive lives at home, work, school and with friends and family. The cause or causes of ADHD are not yet known, although researchers believe that genes may be one factor in the development of the disease. It is most likely that the disorder is the result of a combination of elements, including environmental factors, traumatic head injuries, nutrition, and social influences.

  • Aerosol abuse: Aerosol abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Aerosols include air fresheners, hair spray, spray pain and deodorants. These aerosols can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Aerosol addiction: Aerosol addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse aerosol (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Aerosols includes spray pain, air freshener, deodorants and hair sprays.
  • Affective Disorders, Psychotic: A mental disorder involving mood disturbance and psychotic symptoms.
  • Aging: The medical conditions from getting older.
  • Aging brain syndrome: Aging processes in the brain can cause various psychological and neurological symptoms.
  • Agoraphobia: Fear of unfamiliar surroundings
  • Alcohol Withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when alcohol consumption is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing syndrome: The excessive consumption of alcohol can result in symptoms similar to a condition called Cushing's syndrome. When alcohol consumption is stopped, symptoms regress.
  • Alcoholism: Alcoholism is the compulsive urge to drink alcohol despite knowing the negative impact on one's health.
  • Alprazolam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Alprazolam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Alzheimer disease 10: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 10 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 10p13.
  • Alzheimer disease 12: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 12 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 8p12-q22.
  • Alzheimer disease 13: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q21. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 14: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q25. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 15: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 3q22-q24. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 16: Alzheimer disease 16 (late-onset) is a form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome Xq21.3. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 2, late-onset: Alzheimer disease 2 (late-onset) is a form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 19q13.2. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 3, (early-onset Alzheimer disease): Alzheimer disease 3 is an early-onset form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 5: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 5 has a late onset and is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 12p11.
  • Alzheimer disease 6: A genetic form of Alzheimer's. Type 6 has a late onset and is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 10q24.
  • Alzheimer disease 7: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 7 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 10p13.
  • Alzheimer disease 8: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 8 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 20p.
  • Alzheimer disease 9: A genetic form of Alzheimer's. Type 9 has a late onset and is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 19p13.2.
  • Alzheimer disease, early-onset, with cerebral amyloid angiopathy: An early-onset form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 21q21. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 1: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 21q. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 11: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 9p22.1. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 3, with spastic paraparesis and apraxia: This form of Alzheimer's is an early-onset form of Alzheimer's that is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3. It is characterized by features which are atypical for Alzheimer's - spastic paraparesis which occurs before the dementia symptoms and apraxia. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 3, with spastic paraparesis and unusual plaques: This form of Alzheimer's is an early-onset form of Alzheimer's that is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3. It is characterized by features which are atypical for Alzheimer's - spastic paraparesis which occurs before the dementia symptoms and unusual plaques in the brain. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 4: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q31-q42. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer's Disease: Dementia-causing brain disease mostly in seniors and the elderly.
  • Amlodipine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amlodipine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amnestic disorder: Memory decline disorder
  • Amphetamine abuse: Use of the stimulant drugs known as amphetamines or "speed"
  • Amphetamine withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when amphetamine use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Amphetamines include dexamphetamine (speed), Ritalin and MDMA (ecstasy).
  • Anaemia, sideroblastic, X-linked -- ataxia: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by mild anemia and early onset neurological motor symptoms. The neurological symptoms tend to be relatively stable or slowly progressive with only occasional dependence on crutches or wheelchairs.
  • Andropause: A symptomatic decline in male androgens that may occur as men age.
  • Anemia: Reduced ability of blood to carry oxygen from various possible causes.
  • Anorexia Nervosa: A disorder where a distorted sense of body image leads to self-starvation to the point of death in some cases.
  • Anxiety: A feeling of apprehension, and fear without apparent stimulus that is associated sometime with somatic responses
  • Anxiety depression: Anxiety can sometimes co-occur with depression and produce a confusing clinical picture wherein one of the conditions maybe diagnosed and the other missed out on.
  • Anxiety disorders: Anxiety disorders are persistent and excessive feelings of fear, worry or uneasiness that are significant enough to have an impact on day-to-day life. Excessive anxiety can have repercussions on physical and mental health. There are a number of different subtypes of anxiety disorders such as General anxiety, Social anxiety, Phobias, Hypochondria and Obsessive compulsive disorder.
  • Asperger syndrome: A neuropsychiatric disorder mainly involving the inability to understand and becoming involved in social interaction.
  • Atenolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Atenolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Behavioral disorder with hyperactivity and/or inattention.
  • Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder, Susceptibility to, 1: ADHD or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a common neurobehavioral developmental disorder that usually occurs in childhood and can continue into adulthood. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to ADHD. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 16p13.
  • Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder, Susceptibility to, 2: ADHD or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a common neurobehavioral developmental disorder that usually occurs in childhood and can continue into adulthood. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to ADHD. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 17p11.
  • Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder, Susceptibility to, 3: ADHD or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a common neurobehavioral developmental disorder that usually occurs in childhood and can continue into adulthood. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to ADHD. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q12.
  • Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder, Susceptibility to, 4: ADHD or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a common neurobehavioral developmental disorder that usually occurs in childhood and can continue into adulthood. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to ADHD. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5p13.
  • Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder, Susceptibility to, 5: ADHD or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a common neurobehavioral developmental disorder that usually occurs in childhood and can continue into adulthood. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to ADHD. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q21.1.
  • Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder, Susceptibility to, 6: ADHD or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a common neurobehavioral developmental disorder that usually occurs in childhood and can continue into adulthood. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to ADHD. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 13q12.11.
  • Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder, Susceptibility to, 7: ADHD or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a common neurobehavioral developmental disorder that usually occurs in childhood and can continue into adulthood. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to ADHD. Type 7 is linked to a defect on chromosome 12q21.
  • Attenuated congenital adrenal hyperplasia: A late onset form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia where insufficient adrenal corticosteroids are produced by the body due to the deficiency of a particular chemical. The severity of symptoms varies from person to person and onset may occur as early as childhood.
  • Atypical depression: AD is a subtype of dysthymia and Major Depression characterized by mood reactivity - being able to experience improved mood in response to positive events.
  • Autism: Childhood mental condition with social and communication difficulties.
  • Autoimmune limbic encephalitis: Limbic encephalitis is an inflammation of the limbic system which is the part of the brain responsible for basic autonomic functions. In the paraneoplastic type, the inflammation is caused by autoimmune processes.
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease associated Celiac Disease: Patients with autoimmune thyroid disease are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Autoimmune thyroid diseases: Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland.
  • Back tumour: The presence of tumour growth in the vertebra, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast.
  • Balance disorders: Various disorders impairing the body's sense of balance.
  • Baltic myoclonic epilepsy: A rare inherited type of progressive myoclonus epilepsy which tends to cause symptoms during childhood. The involuntary muscle movements tend to occur more frequently and become more severe with increasing age. Symptoms may occur following various stimuli such as light, stress or exercise.
  • Barre-Lieou syndrome: A rare condition where trauma (such as pinching by adjacent vertebrae or arthritis) to the sympathetic nerves located in the spinal area of the neck results in a variety of neurological symptoms.
  • Basal ganglia calcification, idiopathic 1: Abnormal calcium deposits in the part of the brain called the basal ganglia. Type 1 results in psychiatric, cognitive or neurological problems associated with the calcification. The symptoms experienced are variable.
  • Basilar artery insufficiency: It refers to a temporary set of symptoms due to decreased blood flow in the posterior circulation of the brain.
  • Bearsfoot hellebore poisoning: The Bearsfoot hellebore is a relatively small, flowering evergreen plant which originated in Europe. All parts of the plant contain protoanemonin which can be toxic if large quantities are consumed.
  • Behavioral disorders: Disorders affecting behavior and emotional wellbeing
  • Benzodiazepine abuse: Abuse of benzodiazepine tranquiliser medications
  • Betaxolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Betaxolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Bilateral abductor vocal cord paralysis syndrome: A complication that can occur following the removal of the thyroid gland.
  • Binswanger Disease: Multi-infarct dementia, caused by damage to deep white matter.
  • Binswanger's Disease: A type of senile dementia characterized by chronic cerebrovascular disease.
  • Biotin deficiency: Vitamin H deficiency
  • Bipolar disorder: Cycles of mania and depression; commonly called "manic-depression".
  • Bipolar disorder/cyclothymic disorder/hypomania:
  • Bisoprolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Bisoprolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Black locust poisoning: The black locust is a large deciduous tree which has long clusters of scented flowers and flat fruit pods. The young leaves, seeds and inner bark contain various chemicals (robin, robinine and robitin) which can be toxic if large quantities are eaten. The flowers are considered edible if handled correctly.
  • Body Dysmorphic Disorder: Delusional belief about body shape or appearance
  • Borderline Personality Disorder: Mental condition with behavioral and emotional problems.
  • Borna disease: An infectious neurological disease that affects warm-blooded animals. There is disagreement as to whether the virus may be the underlying cause of some cases of mental illness in humans.
  • Bottlebrush buckeye poisoning: The Bottlebrush buckeye is a deciduous shrub which bears clusters of white or pink flowers and smooth, leathery fruit containing shiny seeds. The plant originated in southern USA. The plant contains various toxic chemicals (glycoside esculin, saponin aescin) which can cause potentially fatal toxicity if sufficient quantities of the seeds or leaves are consumed.
  • Bradykinesia: A medical term used to describe slow execution of movements and the ability to adjust the body's position is reduced.
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Breast Duct Papilloma: Benign tumour of the collecting duct of the breast.
  • Breathing-related sleep disorder: Breathing-related sleep disorder refers to a spectrum of breathing anomalies ranging from chronic or habitual snoring to upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS) to frank obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) or, in some cases, obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS).
  • Briquet syndrome: A rare, chronic mental disorder characterized mainly by often claiming to have constant physical illness when none is able to be detected. It most often occurs in young females.
  • Brucellosis: An infectious disease caused by the Brucella genus which is transmitted from animals to humans.
  • Bulimia nervosa: Eating disorder with binging (overeating) and purging (vomiting).
  • Burnett's milk drinker's syndrome: Burnett's milk drinker's syndrome is a condition where the body is too alkaline and the blood contains too much calcium which results in impaired kidney function. It can be caused by drinking large quantities of milk or using too many alkaline antacid remedies. High vitamin D intake can make the condition worse. The people most at risk of this condition tend to be older people (especially women) who are taking calcium supplements as well as calcium carbonate containing remedies to treat dyspepsia.
  • Burnett's syndrome: Burnett's syndrome is a condition where the body is too alkaline and the blood contains too much calcium which results in impaired kidney function. It can be caused by drinking large quantities of milk or using too many alkaline antacid remedies. High vitamin D intake can make the condition worse. The people most at risk of this condition tend to be older people (especially women) who are taking calcium supplements as well as calcium carbonate containing remedies to treat dyspepsia.
  • Burnout syndrome: Severe stress caused by work-related physical or mental trauma.
  • CFS subtype 1 (cognitive, musculoskeletal, sleep, anxiety/depression): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 1 tends to be more severe with the dominant symptoms being anxiety, depression and cognitive, musculoskeletal and sleeping problems.
  • CFS subtype 2 ( musculoskeletal, pain, anxiety/depression): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 2 tends to be more severe with the dominant symptoms being anxiety, depression, pain and musculoskeletal problems.
  • CFS subtype 3 (mild): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 3 tends to have milder symptoms than other subtypes.
  • CFS subtype 4 (cognitive, musculoskeletal, sleep, anxiety/depression): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 4 tends to be dominated by cognitive symptoms.
  • CFS subtype 5 (musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 5 tends to be dominated by musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • CFS subtype 6 (postexertional): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 6 tends to be dominated by excessive fatigue following exertion.
  • CFS subtype 7 (pain, infectious, musculoskeletal, sleep, neurological, gastrointestinal, neurocognitive, anxiety/depression): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 7 tends to be more severe with the dominant symptoms being pain, infections, anxiety, depression and musculoskeletal, sleep, neurological, gastrointestinal and neurocognitive problems.
  • California buckeye poisoning: The California buckeye is a deciduous shrub which bears clusters of white or pink flowers and smooth, leathery fruit containing shiny seeds. The plant originated in California. The plant contains various toxic chemicals (glycoside esculin, saponin aescin) which can cause potentially fatal toxicity if sufficient quantities of the seeds or leaves are consumed.
  • Catatonic depression: Catatonic Schizophrenia means lessened muscle tone its symptoms are motor disturbances.
  • Celexa -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Celexa (an antidepressant) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Celiac Disease: Digestive intolerance to gluten in the diet.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 1: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.3. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 10: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q25-q26. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 11: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q28. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 12: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 6q25.3. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 13: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect in the SH2B3 gene on chromosome 12q24. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 2: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 5q31-q33. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 3: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q33. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 4: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 19p13.1. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 5: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 15q11-q13. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 6: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 4q27. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 7: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q31. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 8: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q11-q12. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 9: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3p21. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Cerebrovascular Conditions: Conditions of the brain's blood vessels including stroke.
  • Chat room addiction: Chat room addiction refers to the excessive amounts of time spent on computer chat rooms. When the person attempts to reduce the amount of time spent on the activity they suffer withdrawal symptoms such as irritability and anxiety. The preoccupation can cause problems with relationships and even with work performance.
  • Chemical addiction: Addiction to and abuse of various substances.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Amitrole: Amitrole is a herbicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chloralose: Chloralose is a chemical used mainly in poisons for rodents and crows . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chloromethane: Chloromethane is a chemical used mainly in the production of silicones as well as agricultural chemicals, butyl rubber and other products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrotoluene: Nitrotoluene is a chemical used mainly in industrial applications for the production of things such as agricultural chemicals, explosives, rubber chemicals, sulfur dyes and azo dyes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phencyclidine: Phencyclidine is often used as an illegal recreational drug. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Propoxur: Propoxur is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Child abuse: Physical, sexual, emotional abuse or neglect of child.
  • Childhood depression: Childhood depression is just as serious as adult depression. However, it is important to recognize that children have unique signs to be aware of when recognizing and diagnosing depression.
  • Childhood-Onset Schizophrenia: A rare early-onset form of the mental disorder called schizophrenia. Symptoms start before the age of thirteen. Symptoms usually start gradually and are often preceded by slow motor, speech and language development.
  • Chlordiazepoxide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Chlordiazepoxide (a sedative or hypnotic drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Chlorpromazine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Chlorpromazine (a neuroleptic drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cholestasis disease of pregnancy: A liver condition that can occur usually in the last stage of pregnancy. The flow of bile in the gallbladder or liver is impaired by the high levels of pregnancy hormones. The bile acids build up in the organs and then enter the bloodstream. The main symptom is usually itching. Symptoms usually resolve after delivering the baby. Risk factors includes existing liver condition, multiple pregnancy and a family history of the condition.
  • Choreoacanthocytosis amyotrophic: A rare inherited disease involving neurological degeneration and abnormal red blood cell shape. The disorder progresses slowly and causes involuntary movements, loss of cognitive ability, behavioral changes and seizures.
  • Chromosome 22q deletion: A rare genetic disorder where a portion of the genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 22 is missing. The symptoms or severity may vary somewhat between patients.
  • Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A rare genetic disorder caused by the absence of a small portion of genetic material. A small section of chromosome 22 is missing at a location called q11.2. Chromosome 22 is one of 23 pairs of chromosomes that exist in humans.
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Severe chronic fatigue disorder often following infection.
  • Chronic Hepatitis B: Chronic form of HepB liver infection.
  • Chronic Illness: Any form of continuing chronic illness.
  • Chronic depression: Chronic depression is a mental disorder characterized by an all-encompassing low mood accompanied by low self-esteem, and loss of interest or pleasure in normally enjoyable activities and this maybe present for months together.
  • Chronic liver disease: Any form of chronic liver disease
  • Chronic pelvic pain:
  • Clemastine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Clemastine (an antihistamine) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Clobazam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Clobazam (an anxiolytic and anticonvulsant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Clorazepate -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Clorazepate during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Coastal leucothoe poisoning: The coastal leucothoe is an evergreen shrub which bears small clusters of bell-shaped, white flowers in the apex of the leaves. It also bears small capsulated fruit. The leaves and flower nectar contain a chemical called andromedotoxin which is very toxic and can cause death if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Cocaine abuse: Stimulant drug with various effects
  • Cocaine addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use cocaine on a regular basis. Chronic cocaine use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Cocaine withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when cocaine use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Collagenous celiac disease: Collagenous celiac disease is used to describe progressive celiac disease characterized by the presence of a layer of collagen (scarring) in the intestinal layers. This form of celiac disease usually fails to respond to treatments such as gluten-free diets. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The condition usually fails to respond to treatment and has a poor prognosis.
  • Combat stress reaction: A term used in the military which refers to behaviors that result from the stress of fighting in a war.
  • Computer addiction: Computer addiction refers to the excessive amounts of time spent on the computer. The preoccupation can cause problems with relationships and even with work performance. The time spent on the computer does not refer to work-related activities.
  • Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH): A group of disorder that occur when there is a problem in the process of making adrenal corticosteroids.
  • Congenital adrenal hyperplasia -- non-classical form: A late onset form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia where insufficient adrenal corticosteroids are produced by the body due to the deficiency of a particular chemical. The severity of symptoms varies from person to person and onset may occur as early as childhood.
  • Congenital hepatic porphyria: A rare congenital disorder where there is an excess of porphyrin (pigments) in the body. The liver is responsible for making porpyrins.
  • Constipation: Difficult or dry bowel movements
  • Cope's syndrome: Cope's syndrome is a condition where the body is too alkaline and the blood contains too much calcium. It can be caused by drinking large quantities of milk or using too many alkaline antacid remedies. High vitamin D intake can make the condition worse. The people most at risk of this condition tend to be older people (especially women) who are taking calcium supplements as well as calcium carbonate containing remedies to treat dyspepsia. Severe cases can lead to impaired kidney function (Burnett's syndrome).
  • Corsican Hellebore poisoning: The Corsican hellebore is often grown in gardens. It bears cupped, light green flowers. The plant contains a chemical called protoanemonin which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities. Skin exposure to the plant can also cause skin irritation but it is usually minor and short-lived.
  • Cotard syndrome: A rare syndrome involving depression, suicidal thoughts and the belief that they no longer have a body and are already dead. Sometimes they believe that their body is rotting or that they have no blood or internal organs. Occasionally they believe they are immortal. The condition may have neurological or mental origins.
  • Crack addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use crack on a regular basis. Chronic crack use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Crack is a form of cocaine - powdered cocaine is heated with ammonia or sodium bicarbonate to make rocks of crack. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Crack withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when cocaine hydrochloride use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A very rare degenerative brain disease that can be inherited, transmitted (eg in surgical transplants using infected tissue) or as a result of genetic mutations. The condition is fatal.
  • Crystal meth addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use crystal meth on a regular basis. Crystal meth is a powerful stimulant used illegally for its effects. It is highly addictive and known by street names such as ice, speed, glass, crank and chalk. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Cushing's disease: A condition of hyperadrenocorticism which is secondary to excessive pituitary secretion of ACTH. Cushing's disease is different to Cushing's syndrome which refers to the effects of glucocorticoid excess from any cause.
  • Cushing's syndrome: A rare syndrome where excessive secretion of corticosteroids by the adrenal cortex leads to a variety of symptoms. Hormone-secreting adrenal or pituitary tumors are often the cause of the excessive corticosteroid secretion.
  • Cycad nut poisoning: The cycad nut contains a toxic chemical called cyasin which can be leeched out by soaking in water. The nuts are often used as a food source but it is important to leech out the toxic chemicals first. Eating nuts that still contain the toxin can cause serious symptoms. Cycad nuts may also increase the risk of developing liver cancer.
  • Cyclical edema syndrome: Periodic swelling or bloating that occurs in women while they are standing but disappears when they lie down. Excessive aldosterone hormone may cause the problem which tends do become worse in the period leading up to menstruation.
  • Cyclothymia:
  • Cystitis: Bladder infection or inflammation
  • Decreased folate: Decrease in one of the B vitamins required for red blood cell production
  • Decreased oxygen saturation: decreased amount of oxygen that is dissolved or carried in a given medium
  • Delirium: Severe state of mental confusion
  • Delusional disorder: Persisting delusional beliefs
  • Dementia: Various mental impairment conditions.
  • Dementia With Lewy Bodies: Second most frequent cause of dementia in elderly adults.
  • Deposition diseases related fibromyalgia: Deposition diseases related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with deposition diseases. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues. Deposition diseases involve the abnormal deposit of material in parts of the body such as the joints e.g. gout.
  • Depression: Various syndromes with excessive anxiety, phobias, or fear.
  • Depressive disorders: Depression or its various related conditions.
  • Depressive symptoms: Inappropriate depressed mood.
  • Dexedrine overdose: Dexedrine is a prescription drug mainly used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Dexedrine withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Dexedrine use is discontinued or reduced. Dexedrine is an amphetamine. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Symptoms are usually peak during the second day and last about a week.
  • DiGeorge syndrome: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a genetic disorder which can result in a vast array of symptoms. Various names have been used to describe different manifestations of the syndrome. Di George Syndrome primarily involves an underdeveloped thymus and parathyroid glands which results in lowered immunity low blood calcium levels respectively. Another primary feature is heart defects. Various other variable features are also present. It is not uncommon for patients to have more than one of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome subtypes which can make diagnosis confusing - other subtypes include Sphrintzen syndrome, Caylor cardiofacial syndrome and CATCH 22.
  • Diabetes: Failing or reduced ability of the body to handle sugars.
  • Dienestrol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Dienestrol (a synthetic form of Viagra) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Diethylstilbestrol: A synthetic nonsteroidal estrogen
  • Dilantin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that the use of Dilantin (anti-seizure medication) during pregnancy may cause a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Dissociative disorder: A sudden change in the state of consciousness and identity
  • Dolobid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Dolobid (an NSAID drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Double Depression: Double depression occurs when someone with dysthymia experiences an episode of major depression.
  • Down's Syndrome associated Alzheimer's disease: Early-onset Alzheimer's is more prevalent in Down's Syndrome sufferers than in the general population. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Down's syndrome associated Celiac Disease: Patients with Down's syndrome have a high degree of susceptibility to developing celiac disease. Up to 17% of Down's syndrome sufferers develop celiac disease but this rate varies amongst age groups and country of origin. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Drug abuse: Addiction to any of various illicit drugs.
  • Dysomnia: Dysomnia is a general term for sleep disorder. It is a primary sleep disorder in which the patient suffers from changes in the quantity, quality, or timing of sleep.
  • Dysthymia: Mild form of depression
  • Dysthymia/seasonal depression disorder, PND:
  • Dystonia-Parkinsonism, Adult-Onset: A rare condition characterized by the association of parkinsonism and dystonia due to a neurodegenerative disorder which progresses quickly.
  • Early-onset Alzheimer's: Early-onset Alzheimer's is a form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to genetic defects or occurs in a familial pattern. It is not as common as the non-inherited form of Alzheimer's - occurs in up to 90% of Alzheimer sufferers. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Eating disorders: Various mental disorders impairing normal eating or appetite.
  • Ecstasy abuse: Use of the illicit drug called ecstasy
  • Ecstasy addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use ecstasy on a regular basis. Chronic ecstasy use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Ecstasy is a synthetic psychoactive drug often used as a recreational drug. Street names for the drug includes: XTC, Adam, Clarity, Lover's Speed, Hug, Beans and Love Drug. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Ecstasy withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when ecstasy use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Ectopic ACTH Syndrome: A tumour arising in the body which releases excess quantities of ACTH
  • Elective mutism: A rare psychiatric disorder where a child chooses not to speak in a social setting even though they are capable of speaking and often do so at home.
  • Emotional disorders: A disorder of emotions
  • Endogenous depression: Endogenous depression is a mood disorder that affects some people from birth and is believed to be a genetic condition. A sufferer is prone to become depressed on the advent of traumatic events, exhaustion or when under high levels of stress and may not be aware of the disorder until confronted by symptoms of depression for the first time.
  • Epstein Barr virus related fibromyalgia: Epstein Barr virus related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with infection with the Epstein Barr virus. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues.
  • Etodolac -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Etodolac (used mainly for arthritis) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Excessive dieting: Excessive limitation of food intake can lead to problems and effects such as dizziness, depression, intestinal problems, edema and impaired growth.
  • Familial Forms of Alzheimer's Disease: Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour. Familial forms of the disease tend to run in families and are linked to mutations on various genes. Chromosome 1, 14 19 and 21 are the main chromosomes where mutations resulting in Alzheimer's are located..
  • Familial dysautonomia: An inherited biochemical disorder that primarily affects the autonomic and sensory nervous system.
  • Familial hypopituitarism: Impaired pituitary gland hormone-producing activity that tends to run in families. The failure of the pituitary gland in turn affects other hormone-producing glands which rely on the hormones from the pituitary gland for their activity. Symptoms are determined by the degree and type of hormone deficiency involved.
  • Familial hypothyroidism: Impaired thyroid activity that tends to run in families.
  • Fatigue: Excessive tiredness or weakness.
  • Fecal incontinence: Leaking or poorly controlled bowel motions
  • Felodipine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Felodipine (an antihypertensive drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Female infertility: Infertility that affects the female
  • Fetterbush poisoning: Fetterbush is an evergreen shrub which bears elongated spikes of small, urn-shaped flowers. The plant is found mainly in the US. The leaves and flower nectar contain andromedotoxin which is very poisonous if eaten. Severe poisoning can result in death.
  • Fibromyalgia: A difficult to diagnose condition affecting the muscles and/or joints
  • Florida leucothoe poisoning: The Florida leucothoe is a shrubby plant often grown in gardens. The leaves contain andromedotoxin which can cause serious symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered very poisonous and can result in death if sufficient quantities of leaves are consumed.
  • Flurazepam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Flurazepam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Folate deficiency: Inadequate consumption of folic acid to meet the body's needs. Folic acid is a naturally occurring vitamin found in green leafy vegetables, liver, yeast and mushrooms. Alcohol and excessive cooking can affect folic acid absorption. Some medications may also cause folic acid deficiency. Folate deficiency during pregnancy can result in neural tube defects in the infant.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- chocolate: An intolerance to chocolate is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to chocolate. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize the food. The amount of chocolate required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- sulphite: An intolerance to sulphite is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to sulphite. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize the substance. The amount of sulphite required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Allergy -- beef: A beef allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to beef. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- buckwheat: A buckwheat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to buckwheat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- chicken meat: A chicken meat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to chicken meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- duck meat: A duck meat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to duck meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- goose meat: A goose meat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to goose meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- lamb: A lamb allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to lamb meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- meat: A meat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- pork: A pork allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- red meat: A red meat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to red meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food addiction: Food addiction refers to compulsive eating that is unrelated to actual hunger. The person feels compelled to eat even when they aren't hungry. Although it is not considered a recognised addiction it can have a significant impact on a person's life and health. Food addicts often have underlying emotional problems.
  • Frisium -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Frisium (an anxiolytic and anticonvulsant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Functioning pancreatic endocrine tumor: Tumors that develop in the pancreas and cause excessive secretion of one or more pancreatic hormones such as insulin, somatostatin, glucagons, gastrin, ACTH (corticosteroids) and vasoactive intestinal peptidase.
  • Gaming addiction: Gaming addiction refers to the excessive amounts of time spent on online computer games. When the person attempts to reduce the amount of time spent on the activity they suffer withdrawal symptoms such as irritability and anxiety. The preoccupation can cause problems with relationships and even with work performance.
  • General somatic pain: General somatic pain is a typical sensory experience that may be described as the unpleasant awareness of a noxious stimulus or bodily harm.
  • Generalized anxiety disorder: Excessive anxiety and worrying.
  • Genetic Parkinson disease: A type of Parkinson disease that results from a genetic anomaly. There are a more than ten different genes that can cause Parkinson disease.
  • Glucagonoma syndrome: A rare condition characterized by a tumor which secretes glucagon and a characteristic spreading rash, diabetes mellitus and various other symptoms.
  • Graeck-Imerslund disease:
  • Grasbeck-Imerslund Disease: A rare inherited disorder characterized by vitamin B12 deficiency which results from the body's inability to absorb vitamin B12 from the foods eaten.
  • Graves Disease: is an autoimmune disease characterized by hyperthyroidism due to circulating autoantibodies. Thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins (TSIs) bind to and activate thyrotropin receptors, causing the thyroid gland to grow and the thyroid follicles to increase synthesis of thyroid hormone.
  • Grief or loss: The normal emotional response that occurs to an external loss
  • Guilt: Excessive feelings of personal guilt
  • Gulf War syndrome: Syndrome in military veterans of the Gulf war
  • HIV-1, CRF01_AE: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF A/E occurs mainly in Asia and originated in central Africa. It tends to be transmitted mainly through heterosexual contact i.e. infection occurs through mucosal exposure.
  • HIV-1, CRF02_AG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/G involves both And G subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF A/G occurs mainly in west and central Africas well as Taiwan.
  • HIV-1, CRF04_ cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/B involves both And B subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF_cpx is made up of a combination of subtypes A, G, H, K, and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Cyprus and Greece.
  • HIV-1, CRF05_ D/F: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF D/F involves both D and F subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF D/F occurs mainly in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
  • HIV-1, CRF06_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF06_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, G, J and K - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Burkina Faso and Mali.
  • HIV-1, CRF07_BC: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF07_BC involves a combination of type B' and C and is extremely rare.
  • HIV-1, CRF08_BC: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF08_BC involves a combination of type B' and C and is extremely rare.
  • HIV-1, CRF11_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF11_cpx is extremely rare and appears to include a mix of subtypes CRF01 (And E), A, G and J - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes).
  • HIV-1, CRF12_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF B/F has been diagnosed in Uruguay and Argentina.
  • HIV-1, CRF13_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF13_cpx involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E), A, G, J and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes).
  • HIV-1, CRF14_BG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF14_BG involves a combination of subtypes B and G. This subtype has been diagnosed in Spain.
  • HIV-1, CRF15_01B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF15_01B involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E) and B.
  • HIV-1, CRF16_ A2D: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF16_ A2D involves a combination of subtypes A2 and D. This subtype has been diagnosed in Kenyand South Korea.
  • HIV-1, CRF17_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF17_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F.
  • HIV-1, CRF18_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF18_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, E, F, G, H, K and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes).
  • HIV-1, CRF19_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF19_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, E, D and G - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes).
  • HIV-1, CRF20_BG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF20_BG involves a combination of subtypes B and G. This subtype has been diagnosed in Cuba.
  • HIV-1, CRF21_A2D: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF21_A2D involves a combination of subtypes A, D and G.
  • HIV-1, CRF22_01A1: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF22_01A1 involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E) and A1.
  • HIV-1, CRF23_BG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF23_BG involves a combination of subtypes B and G.
  • HIV-1, CRF24_BG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF24_BG involves a combination of subtypes B and G. This subtype has been diagnosed in Cuba.
  • HIV-1, CRF25_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF25_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, G and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Cameroon and Saudi Arabia.
  • HIV-1, CRF26_AU: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF26_AU involves a combination of subtypes And U.
  • HIV-1, CRF27_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF27_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, E, G, H, J, K and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
  • HIV-1, CRF28_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF28_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F.
  • HIV-1, CRF29_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF29_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F.
  • HIV-1, CRF30_0206: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF30_0206 involves a combination of subtypes CRF02 (And G) and CRF06 (A, G, J and K).
  • HIV-1, CRF31_BC: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF31_BC involves a combination of subtypes B and C.
  • HIV-1, CRF32_06A1: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF32_06A1involves a combination of subtypes CRF06 (A, G, J, K) and A1.
  • HIV-1, CRF33_01B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF33_01B involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E) and B. This subtype has been diagnosed in Malaysia.
  • HIV-1, CRF34_01B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF34_01B involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E) and B. This subtype has been diagnosed in Thailand.
  • HIV-1, CRF35_AD: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF35_AD involves a combination of subtypes And D. This subtype has been diagnosed in Afghanistan.
  • HIV-1, CRF36_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF36_cpx involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E), CRF02 (And G) and G - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Cameroon.
  • HIV-1, CRF37_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF37_cpx involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E), CRF02 (And G) and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Cameroon.
  • HIV-1, CRF38_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF38_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F.
  • HIV-1, CRF39_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF39_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F. This subtype has been diagnosed in Brazil.
  • HIV-1, CRF40_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF40_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F. This subtype has been diagnosed in Brazil.
  • HIV-1, CRF41_CD: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF41_CD involves a combination of subtypes C and D.
  • HIV-1, CRF42_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF42_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F1.
  • HIV-1, CRF43_02G: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF43_02G involves a combination of subtypes CRF02 (And G) and G. This type has been diagnosed in Saudi Arabia.
  • HIV-1A: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype A is most prevalent in West Africa.
  • HIV-1A1: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1A1 is a subtype of HIV-1A.
  • HIV-1A2: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1A2 is a subtype of HIV-1A.
  • HIV-1A3: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1A3 is a subtype of HIV-1A.
  • HIV-1B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype B is most prevalent in Thailand, Australia, Japan, Europe and America. This subtype tends to be transmitted mainly by homosexual contact and intravenous drug use i.e. infection occurs mainly through blood exposure.
  • HIV-1C: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype C is most prevalent in Nepal, India and Southern and Eastern parts of Africa. This subtype tends to be a more virulent subtype and is transmitted mainly through heterosexual contact i.e. infection occurs through mucosal exposure.
  • HIV-1D: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype D is most prevalent in the Eastern and Central parts of Africa and tends to be a more virulent subtype.
  • HIV-1E: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype E has to date not occurred on its own but has occurred in combination with subtype A in a subtype called CRF A/E. This subtype occurs mainly in Asia and originated in central Africa. It tends to be transmitted mainly through heterosexual contact i.e. infection occurs through mucosal exposure.
  • HIV-1F: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype F is most prevalent in Eastern Europe, South America and Central Africa.
  • HIV-1F1: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1F1 is a subtype of HIV-1F.
  • HIV-1F2: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1F2 is a subtype of HIV-1F.
  • HIV-1G: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype G is most prevalent in Africa and central parts of Europe. This subtype tends to be a more virulent subtype.
  • HIV-1H: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype H is most prevalent in central parts of Africa.
  • HIV-1J: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype J is most prevalent in central America.
  • HIV-1K: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype K is most prevalent in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Cameroon.
  • HIV-1M: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1 group M is the most common form of HIV accounting for roughly 90% of cases worldwide.
  • HIV-1N: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group N is very rare and has only been diagnosed in Cameroon.
  • HIV-1O: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group O is very rare and has only been diagnosed in the western parts of Central Africa. This type is more difficult to diagnose and the standard test kits are not sensitive enough to pick up the virus.
  • HIV-2: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-2 is very rare and is generally only diagnosed in Africa but a number of cases have been diagnosed in the US. HIV-2 is less easily transmitted than HIV-1 and the time between infection and symptoms tends to be longer in HIV-2.
  • HIV-2A: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. HIV-2 has two subtypes - And B and they are found mainly in Western Africa.
  • HIV-2B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. HIV-2 has two subtypes - And B and they are found mainly in Western Africa.
  • HIV/AIDS: HIV is a sexually transmitted virus and AIDS is the progressive immune failure that HIV causes.
  • Hashimoto's Thyroiditis: Hashimoto thyroiditis is characterized by the destruction of thyroid cells by various cell- and antibody-mediated immune processes. Patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis have antibodies to various thyroid antigens, the most frequently detected of which include antithyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), antithyroglobulin (anti-Tg), and, to a lesser extent, TSH receptor-blocking antibodies.
  • Head injury: An injury to the head
  • Headache: In medicine a headache or cephalalgia is a symptom of a number of different conditions of the head and sometimes neck. Some of the causes are benign while others are medical emergencies. It ranks among the most common pain complaints
  • Hearing Impairment: Reduced ability to hear sounds.
  • Heart disease: Any of various heart conditions.
  • Heart failure: Slow failure of the heart (cardiac insufficiency).
  • Hepatic encephalopathy syndrome: A rare syndrome involving the association of advanced liver disease and neurological problems.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Golden Seal: Golden seal can be used as a herbal agent to treat a variety of conditions - bleeding after birth, mucosal inflammation, constipation, hemorrhoids. The herbal agent contains chemicals (alkaloid hydrastine, berberine) which can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Hereditary hypothyroidism: Hereditary hypothyroidism is a condition in which there is a defect in the thyroid gland which leads to increased production of TSH reduced production of thyroid hormone.
  • Heroin dependence: The physical and psychological dependence to the recreational drug heroin
  • Hip cancer: The presence of tumour growth in the bone of the hip, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast; cancer affecting bone of hip likely to affect other bones e.g. vertebra, ribs
  • Holiday depression: The holiday season can be a time full of joy, cheer, parties and family gatherings. But for many people, it is a time of self-evaluation, loneliness, reflection on past failures and anxiety about an uncertain future hence leading to holiday depression.
  • Honey intoxication: Food poisoning from the ingestion of honey.
  • Hopelessness: feeling despair
  • Human T-lymphotropic virus type 3: A former name used for HIV which is an infectious viral disease. The infection usually has an initial symptom-free period which is followed by various stages of increasing severity.
  • Huntington's Disease: Inherited disease causing progressive mental deterioration.
  • Hydrocodone withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Hydrocodone use is discontinued or reduced. Hydrocodone is pain-killing drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Symptoms are usually peak during the second day and last about a week.
  • Hyper IgE: Inherited immunodeficiency disorders involving excessive production of IgE and frequent bacterial (staphylococcal) infections mainly involving the skin as well as other problems. Recessively inherited forms of the condition tend to be more serious with bone problems.
  • Hyperactivity: Excessive action and lack of control.
  • Hyperadrenalism: Excessive levels of adrenal hormones in the body. Symptoms depend on which hormone is involved and the degree of involvement. Adrenal hormones are aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine.
  • Hyperostosis frontalis interna: A disorder where the front bone of the skull becomes thicker than normal.
  • Hyperparathyroidism: Increased secretion of parathyroid hormone from the parathyroid glands.
  • Hyperparathyroidism, primary: A rare genetic disorder where excessive activity of the parathyroid gland causes increased blood calcium levels which can cause various problems.
  • Hypersensitivity pneumonitis:
  • Hypersomnia: Hypersomnia is characterized by recurring episodes of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) or prolonged nighttime sleep.
  • Hyperthyroidism: Too much thyroid hormone production.
  • Hypoadrenalism: Reduced adrenal gland activity.
  • Hypoadrenocorticism -- hypoparathyroidism -- moniliasis: An autoimmune disorder where hormone production by various glands is reduced. The main features of the disorder are Addison disease and/or hypoparathyroidism and/or chronic candidiasis.
  • Hypochondriasis: A disorder characterised by a preoccupation with normal bodily functions as abnormalities
  • Hypoglycemia: Low blood sugar level
  • Hypoparathyroidism, autoimmune: A rare autoimmune condition characterized by the inflammation of the parathyroid glands and resulting in a deficiency of parathyroid hormones (parathormone). Parathormone helps controls calcium and phosphorus levels in the body. Symptoms become progressively worse as calcium and phosphorus levels become increasingly imbalanced.
  • Hypopituitarism: A disorder caused by reduced pituitary hormone levels. Hormones produce by the pituitary gland produces growth hormones, prolactin, thyroid stimulating hormone, antidiuretic hormone and others.
  • Hypothyroid goitre: Goitre is the enlargement of the thyroid gland and hypothyroid state is characterized by increased TSH levels and decreased T3 and T4 levels circulating in the body.
  • Hypothyroidism: Too little thyroid hormone production.
  • Idiopathic Parkinson's disease: Idiopathic Parkinson's disease is Parkinson's disease for which no particular cause can be determined - it is the most prevalent form of the condition. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Idiopathic edema: A condition involving salt retention that isn't a result of impaired heart, kidney or liver function.
  • Impotence: Inability to attain or sustain an erection.
  • Infectious CFS: Infectious chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic fatigue condition which may follow severe infections - viral or other. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition.
  • Inhalant abuse: Inhalant abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Inhalants include gasoline, adhesives, solvents, and aerosols. These inhalants can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Inhalant addiction: Inhalant addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse inhalants (e.g. inhaling them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Inhalants are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Inhalants includes glues, shoe polish, household cleaners, room deodorizers and nail polish removers.
  • Insomnia: Insomnia is defined as repeated difficulty with the initiation, duration, maintenance, or quality of sleep that occurs despite adequate time and opportunity for sleep that results in some form of daytime impairment.
  • Irritable bowel syndrome: Spasms in the colon wall
  • Isotretinoin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Isotretinoin (an acne treatment drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Itraconazole -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Itraconazole (an antifungal drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Japanese andromeda poisoning: An evergreen flowering shrub originating from Asia. The leaves and flower nectar contain a chemical called andromedotoxin which is highly toxic. Ingesting the leaves or nectar can result in death as the plant is considered highly toxic.
  • Job syndrome: An immunodeficiency disorder characterized by excessive production of IgE and frequent bacterial infections mainly involving the skin.
  • Kartagener syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by enlarged bronchial tubes, sinusitis and cross-positioning of body organs.
  • Kawasaki disease: A childhood illness that generally affects the skin, mouth and lymph nodes.
  • Ketorolac -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ketorolac during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Klonopin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Klonopin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • LSD addiction: LSD addiction is the uncontrollable craving for LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide) which is a hallucinogenic drug which is derived from a type of fungus. Although the drug is not technically classified as addictive as it doesn't cause drug-seeking behaviours but increasing tolerance to the drug means that increasing doses of the drug are required to achieve the desired effects. It causes a psychological addiction rather than a physical addiction.
  • Lamictal -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lamictal during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lamotrigine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lamotrigine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Late-onset Alzheimer's: Late-onset Alzheimer's is a form of Alzheimer's disease that doesn't appear to be linked to any genetic defects or familial pattern. It is by far the most common form of Alzheimer's - occurs in up to 90% of Alzheimer sufferers. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Lazarus complex: Various symptoms observed in people who have survived a heart attack.
  • Lead poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to lead.
  • Lenten rose poisoning: Lenten rose is a herbaceous plant which has light-colored flowers which become purple as they age. The plant is often found in gardens. The plant contains a chemical called protoanemonin which can cause various symptoms if large quantities are eaten. Skin irritation can also result from skin exposure.
  • Librium -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Librium (a sedative or hypnotic drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lidocaine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Limbic encephalitis: Inflammation of the limbic system which is the part of the brain responsible for basic autonomic functions.
  • Lodine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lodine (used mainly for arthritis) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lorazepam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lorazepam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lupus: Autoimmune disease with numerous effects on various organs and linings.
  • Lyme disease: Lyme disease is an emerging infectious disease caused by at least three species of bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia.
  • Lymphomatous thyroiditis: Progressive thyroid gland enlargement due to autoimmune disease.
  • Macrocytosis: Blood condition where average red blood cell size is increased
  • Major depressive disorder: A condition which is characterized by the occurrence of a major episode of depression
  • Major depressive disorder related fibromyalgia: Major depressive disorder related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with major depression. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues.
  • Marijuana addiction: Marijuana addiction is the uncontrollable desire to use marijuana on a regular basis. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Marsh marigold poisoning: Marsh marigold is a low growing plant with rounded leaves and small yellow flowers. The plant can be found growing in the wild or in gardens. The leaves from the plant contain a chemical called protoanemonin which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten. The young leaves are actually edible if they are boiled with frequent changes of water.
  • Mc Leod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by neuromuscular, blood and central nervous system symptoms. The disease is slowly progressive.
  • Medication related hypothyroidism: Drug-induced hypothyroidism is an underactive thyroid gland due to a reaction from medication.
  • Mediterranean myoclonic epilepsy: A rare inherited type of progressive myoclonus epilepsy which tends to cause symptoms during childhood. The involuntary muscle movements tend to occur more frequently and become more severe with increasing age. Symptoms may occur following various stimuli such as light, stress or exercise.
  • Megaloblastic Anemia 1: A rare genetic blood disorder where a defect in the vitamin B12 receptor means that it can't be absorbed from food during digestion. As a result of the low vitamin B12 levels, the body produces increased numbers of abnormal enlarged red blood cells (megaloblasts).
  • Megaloblastic anemia: A rare blood disorder where insufficient vitamin B12 absorption results in reduced production of red blood cells and increased levels of abnormal, enlarged red blood cells (megaloblasts). Vitamin B12 insufficiency can result from absorption problems or lack of dietary intake of the vitamin or folic acid.
  • Melancholic depression: Melancholic depression, or 'depression with melancholic features' is a subtype of major depression characterized by the inability to find pleasure in positive things combined with physical agitation, insomnia, or decreased appetite.
  • Menopause: The end of female menstruation and fertility.
  • Mental health conditions: Medical conditions related to mental health, emotions, behavior, personality, psychology, psychiatry, and so on.
  • Mental illness: Any psychological syndrome
  • Metabolic Syndrome: A common body syndrome with the "deadly quartet" of major conditions: obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and high lipids.
  • Metachromatic Leukodystrophy: An inherited biochemical deficiency involving a deficiency of the enzyme called arylsulfatase A which leads to a harmful buildup of fatty material in the body.
  • Methamphetamine withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when methamphetamine use is discontinued or reduced. Methamphetamines are often called speed, meth, crystal or crank. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Metoprolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Metoprolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Mild brain injury caused by trauma, accident or injury
  • Milk poisoning: Milk poisoning is a condition where the body is too alkaline and the blood contains too much calcium. It can be caused by drinking large quantities of milk or using too many alkaline antacid remedies. High vitamin D intake can make the condition worse. The people most at risk of this condition tend to be older people (especially women) who are taking calcium supplements as well as calcium carbonate containing remedies to treat dyspepsia.
  • Milk-Alkali syndrome: Milk-Alkali syndrome is a condition where the body is too alkaline and the blood contains too much calcium which results in impaired kidney function. It can be caused by drinking large quantities of milk or using too many alkaline antacid remedies. High vitamin D intake can make the condition worse. The people most at risk of this condition tend to be older people (especially women) who are taking calcium supplements as well as calcium carbonate containing remedies to treat dyspepsia.
  • Mitochondrial Parkinson's disease: A form of Parkinson's disease that seems to be linked to mitochondrial defects - mitochondria are the energy-producing components of body cells. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Moderate chronic pain: Moderate chronic pain is defined as pain that persists longer than the temporal course of natural healing, associated with a particular type of injury or disease process and is moderate in intensity.
  • Mood disorders: Disorders that affect a persons mood
  • Mountain andromeda poisoning: The Mountain Andromeda is an evergreen flowering shrub bearing elongated clusters of white flowers. The leaves and flower nectar contain a chemical called andromedotoxin which is highly toxic. Ingesting the leaves or nectar can result in death as the plant is considered highly toxic.
  • Multiple Sclerosis: Autoimmune attack on spinal nerves causing diverse and varying neural problems.
  • Musculoskeletal chronic fatigue syndrome: Musculoskeletal chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. Musculoskeletal chronic fatigue syndrome tends to be dominated by musculoskeletal symptoms.
  • Myoclonus progressive epilepsy of Unverricht and Lundborg: A rare genetic brain disease characterized by convulsions which become progressively worse. Modern treatment can have a big effect on the prognosis.
  • Myofascial pain syndromes: Any pain associated with the myofascia of the muscle tissue
  • Myxedema: Skin and tissue disorder usually due to hypothyroidism
  • Nabumetone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Nabumetone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Naproxen -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Naproxen during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Narcolepsy: Narcolepsy is characterized by the classic tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis.
  • Narcotic addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use narcotics on a regular basis. The drug may be used as a therapeutic medication for various conditions but it's use is also frequently abused. Examples of narcotic drugs include heroin, morphine, Demerol and codeine. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Neurological chronic fatigue syndrome: Neurological chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic fatigue condition which tends to be dominated by neurological symptoms. Symptoms tend to be more severe than other forms of CFS. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition.
  • Neurosis: Variety of mental disorders with self-awareness
  • Neurosyphilis: A complication of untreated syphilis where the infection invades the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) and causes a range of neurological symptoms. The condition can be life-threatening but some cases are asymptomatic. There are four forms of the condition: asymptomatic, meningovascular, tabes dorsalis and general paresis.
  • Neurotoxicity syndromes: Altered nervous system functioning caused by exposure to certain chemicals (manmade or natural) that affect the nervous system - essentially it is the poisoning of the nervous system. Examples of toxic compounds that may cause neurotoxicity include lead, certain solvents and pesticides. Symptoms may occur immediately or gradually over a period of time.
  • Niemann-Pick disease, type D: Niemann-Pick disease is an inherited metabolic disorder where lipids are not able to be metabolized adequately and hence build up and cause damage in various parts of the body such as the spleen, liver, lungs, bone marrow and brain. Type D is no longer a relevant term as research has shown that it has the same genetic mutation as Type C and is therefore the same condition.
  • Nifedipine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Nifedipine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Non Classic Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: A late onset form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia where insufficient adrenal corticosteroids are produced by the body due to the deficiency of a particular chemical. The severity of symptoms varies from person to person and onset may occur as early as childhood.
  • Nonaffective Psychosis: Any mental disorder that is characterised by a significant derangement of ones personality and a loss of ones touch with reality
  • Norfloxacin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Norfloxacin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Novo-Clopate -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Novo-Clopate during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Nymphomania: uncontrollable urge to engage in sexual behaviour in a female.
  • Obesity hypoventilation syndrome: Obesity hypoventilation syndrome is defined as the combination of obesity (body mass index above 30kg/m2), hypoxia (falling oxygen levels in blood) during sleep, and hypercapnia (increased blood carbon dioxide levels) during the day, resulting from hypoventilation (excessively slow or shallow breathing)
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder -- Checkers: Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a behavioural disorder involving obsessive thoughts and compulsive acts. Checkers represent one form of manifestation of OCD and involves obsessively checking things such as switches and locks. The behavior can occur in the home or work environment. Patients are fearful that the have left something on or unlocked which could lead to some sort of harm to themselves or others. The may set up extravagant rituals to ensure they haven't missed checking any locks or switches.
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder -- Cleaners: Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a behavioural disorder involving obsessive thoughts and compulsive acts. Cleaners represent one form of manifestation of OCD and involves obsessive thoughts and compulsions about contamination of any form - germs, bacteria, viruses, dirt etc. Sufferers feel compelled to safeguard themselves and their surroundings from contamination but repeatedly cleaning surfaces, their clothes and other objects in their environment.
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder -- Habits: Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a behavioural disorder involving obsessive thoughts and compulsive acts. Habits represent one form of manifestation of OCD and involves the compulsion to repeat certain behaviors an excessive amount of times. For example, a person may feel the need to count the money many times before they hand it over in payment for an item or they may feel compelled to repeat a question a number of times.
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder -- Hoarders: Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a behavioural disorder involving obsessive thoughts and compulsive acts. Hoarders represent one form of manifestation of OCD and involves obsessively collecting and hoarding items. These items are often considered useless or junk by the average person but hoarders may also collect relatively useful items such as matchbooks but the quantities hoarded exceed the useful quanitity. Hoaders tend to live in cluttered chaotic homes due to their obsession.
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder -- Obsessers: Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a behavioural disorder involving obsessive thoughts and compulsive acts. Obsessers represent one form of manifestation of OCD and sufferers having thoughts and visions of them causing some sort of harm to others e.g. raping someone. To counteract these intrusive, involuntary thoughts and images, they will obsessively say certain words, recite prayers or count numbers to distract themselves. They tend to have no visible manifestations of their conditions as they carry their rituals mentally rather than verbally.
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder -- Orderers: Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a behavioural disorder involving obsessive thoughts and compulsive acts. Orderers represent one form of manifestation of OCD and involves the compulsion to make sure that certain things are ordered or placed in a particular way which they feel is the correct way. Sufferers feel very distressed if another person disrupts the things they have ordered.
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder -- Washers: Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a behavioural disorder involving obsessive thoughts and compulsive acts. Washers represent one form of manifestation of OCD and involves obsessive thoughts and compulsions about contamination of any form ( germs, bacteria, viruses, dirt etc.) which compels them to repeatedly wash their hands or shower.
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder -- Washers and Cleaners: Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a behavioural disorder involving obsessive thoughts and compulsive acts. Washers and cleaners represent one form of manifestation of OCD and involves obsessive thoughts and compulsions about contamination of any form - germs, bacteria, viruses, dirt etc. Sufferers feel compelled to safeguard themselves and their surroundings from contamination but repeatedly washing their hands and cleaning surfaces, their clothes and other objects in their environment.
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder: Behavioral disorder with obsessive thoughts and compulsive acts.
  • Obstructive sleep apnea: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome is characterized by episodic upper airway obstruction that occurs during sleep.
  • Online gambling addiction: Online gambling addiction refers to the excessive amounts of time and money spent on online gambling. When the person attempts to reduce the amount of time and money spent on the activity they suffer withdrawal symptoms such as irritability and anxiety. The preoccupation can cause problems with finances, relationships and even with work performance.
  • Online shopping addiction: Online shopping addiction refers to the excessive amounts of time and money spent on online shopping, often buying things which are neither wanted or used. When the person attempts to reduce the amount of time and money spent on the activity they suffer withdrawal symptoms such as irritability and anxiety. The preoccupation can cause problems with finances, relationships and even with work performance.
  • Opioid addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use opioids on a regular basis. Opioids may may be prescribed by a physician for the purpose of pain relief but patients may become physically dependent on the drug and continue to obsessively use it even after the condition it was prescribed for has resolved. In other cases, opioid addiction results from the illicit use of the drug for recreational purposes. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling. Examples of opioids includes morphine, heroin, oxycodone and fentanyl.
  • Opium addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use opium on a regular basis. Opium may may be prescribed by a physician for the purpose of pain relief but patients may become physically dependent on the drug and continue to obsessively use it even after the condition it was prescribed for has resolved. In other cases, opium addiction results from the illicit use of the drug for recreational purposes. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Opium withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Opium use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Organic mood syndrome: Persistant mood changes due to physical causes such as a chemical imbalance rather than psychiatric causes. The duration and severity of the condition is determined by the nature and location of the cause.
  • Osteoarthritis: Osteoarthritis is a chronic condition characterised by mechanical disrturbances due to degradation of joints. It is the most common form of arthritis, and the leading cause of chronic disability.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 1: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 21q21-q33 and tends to primarily affect the hip joints.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 2: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2p24-p23 and tends to primarily affect the hand joints.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 3: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 9q21.3-q22 and tends to primarily affect the knee and hip joints.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 4: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q33.3.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 5: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20q11.2 and tends to primarily affect the hip joints.
  • Osteoarthritis Susceptibility 6: Osteoarthritis refers to degeneration of the joints which causes symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. Genetic forms of osteoarthritis tend to have an earlier onset. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 3p24.3 and tends to primarily affect the knee joints.
  • Over-diagnosed conditions: Any condition that is diagnosed to excess even though the patient may not have the condition
  • Oxprenolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Oxprenolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • OxyContin withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when OxyContin use is discontinued or reduced. OxyContin is a pain reliever but is also used as a recreation drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Oxycontin addiction: Oxycontin is a commonly prescribed pain killer which is recognized as carrying a high risk of addiction. Initial use of the drug may be to control chronic pain but patients may find themselves increasingly dependent on the drug and unable to stop its use. Other cases of addiction may occur when people deliberately and illegally misuse Oxycontin as a recreational drug.
  • PANDAS: A rare disorder characterized by the association of a tic disorder or OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder) with a streptococcal infection and neuropsychiatric symptoms. The symptoms can start suddenly and recovery is slow with frequent relapses. It is believed that the infection affects a part of the brain that is involved with movement.
  • Pain killer addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use pain-relieving medication on a regular basis. Pain killers are often prescribed for the treatment of sleeping problems but chronic use can lead to dependence on the drug. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Pancreatic cancer: Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm of the pancreas
  • Panic disorder: It is a severe medical condition characterized by extremely elevated mood.
  • Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis: Limbic encephalitis is an inflammation of the limbic system which is the part of the brain responsible for basic autonomic functions. In the paraneoplastic type, the inflammation is caused by cancers such as small cell lung cancer.
  • Parkinson disease 10 (PARK10): Type 10 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 1p32. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 11 (PARK11): Type 11 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 2q21.2. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 12 (PARK12): Type 12 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome Xq21-q25. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 13 (PARK13): Type 13 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 2p12. This form of the condition tends to progress slowly. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 2, autosomal recessive juvenile (PARK2): Type 2 Parkinson disease is juvenile form of the condition and is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 6q25.2-q27. The condition may be inherited in a recessive manner and symptoms tend to be milder following sleep. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 3, autosomal dominant Lewy body (PARK3): Type 3 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 2p13. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 4, autosomal dominant Lewy body (PARK4): Type 4 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 4q21. This form of the condition tends to start around the age of 45 years and progresses rapidly. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 5 (PARK5): Type 5 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 4p14. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 6, autosomal recessive early-onset (PARK6): Type 6 Parkinson disease is an early-onset form of the condition and is linked to a genetic mutation on the PINK1 gene on chromosome 1p36. The condition may be inherited in a recessive manner and symptoms tend to fluctuate during the day. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 7, autosomal recessive early-onset (PARK7): Type 7 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation in the DJ1 gene on chromosome 1p36. This form of the condition tends to start before the age of 40 years and progresses slowly. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 8 (PARK8): Type 8 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 1p32. This form of the condition tends to progress slowly. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 9 (PARK9): Type 9 Parkinson disease is linked to a mutation in the ATP13A2 gene on chromosome 1p36. This condition progresses rapidly and usually starts during the second decade of life. Dementia, eye movement problems and wasting of the brain tissue occur in addition to the typical symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease, familial, type 1 (PARK1): Type 1 familial Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 4q21. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease, genetic types: A type of Parkinson disease that results from a genetic anomaly. There are a more than ten different genes that can cause Parkinson disease.
  • Parkinson's Disease: Degenerative brain condition characterised by tremor.
  • Pediatric AIDS: Pediatric AIDS is an immune system disease in infants or children caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Symptoms in children are similar to those of an adult but their susceptibility to various AIDS-related conditions varies e.g. children are less susceptible to Kaposi sarcoma, taxoplasmosis and cryptococcosis than adults.
  • Peganone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Peganone (an anticonvulsant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.

 

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