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Diseases » Depression » Prevalence
 

Prevalence and Incidence of Depression

Prevalance of Depression:

estimated 5.3% adults (USSG); 17 million people; approximately 4% of adolescents get seriously depressed (NIMH); annually 12% of women ; 7% of men; lifetime risk of an episode for women 20%. 3-4 million men USA. ... see also overview of Depression.

Prevalance Rate:

approx 1 in 18 or 5.30% or 14.4 million people in USA [Source statistic for calcuation: "estimated 5.3% adults (USSG); 17 million people; approximately 4% of adolescents get seriously depressed (NIMH); annually 12% of women ; 7% of men; lifetime risk of an episode for women 20%. 3-4 million men USA." -- see also general information about data sources]

Prevalance of types of Depression:

For details see prevalence of types of Depression analysis; summary of available prevalence data:

Incidence of types of Depression:

For details see incidence of types of Depression analysis; summary of available incidence by type data:

Lifetime risk for Depression:

7.9-8.6% of adults will have major depression during their lifetime in Canada (Health Canada)

Prevelance of Depression discussion:

Depression in Children and Adolescents A Fact Sheet for Physicians: NIMH (Excerpt)

A number of epidemiological studies have reported that up to 2.5 percent of children and up to 8.3 percent of adolescents in the U.S. suffer from depression.4 An NIMH-sponsored study of 9- to 17-year-olds estimates that the prevalence of any depression is more than 6 percent in a 6-month period, with 4.9 percent having major depression.5 In addition, research indicates that depression onset is occurring earlier in life today than in past decades.6 A recently published longitudinal prospective study found that early-onset depression often persists, recurs, and continues into adulthood, and indicates that depression in youth may also predict more severe illness in adult life.3 Depression in young people often co-occurs with other mental disorders, most commonly anxiety, disruptive behavior, or substance abuse disorders, 7 and with physical illnesses, such as diabetes.8 (Source: excerpt from Depression in Children and Adolescents A Fact Sheet for Physicians: NIMH)

Depression Research: NIMH (Excerpt)

In a given year, between one and two percent of people over age 65 living in the community, i.e., not living in nursing homes or other institutions, suffer from major depression and about two percent have dysthymia. Depression, however, is not a normal part of aging. (Source: excerpt from Depression Research: NIMH)

Depression Research: NIMH (Excerpt)

Additionally, recent NIMH studies show that 13 to 27 percent of older adults have subclinical depressions that do not meet the diagnostic criteria for major depression or dysthymia but are associated with increased risk of major depression, physical disability, medical illness, and high use of health services. Subclinical depressions cause considerable suffering, and some clinicians are now beginning to recognize and treat them. (Source: excerpt from Depression Research: NIMH)

If You're Over 65 and Feeling Depressed Treatment Brings New Hope: NIMH (Excerpt)

Nonetheless, among people 65 and over, as many as 3 out of 100 suffer from clinical depression. It can be serious and can even lead to suicide. (Source: excerpt from If You're Over 65 and Feeling Depressed Treatment Brings New Hope: NIMH)

Older Adults Depression and Suicide Facts: NIMH (Excerpt)

An estimated 6 percent of Americans ages 65 and older in a given year, or approximately 2 million of the 34 million adults in this age group in 1998, have a diagnosable depressive illness (major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, or dysthymic disorder). (Source: excerpt from Older Adults Depression and Suicide Facts: NIMH)

The Numbers Count: NIMH (Excerpt)

Major depressive disorder affects approximately 9.9 million American adults,5 or about 5.0 percent of the U.S. population age 18 and older in a given year. 1 (Source: excerpt from The Numbers Count: NIMH)

What to do When a Friend is Depressed: NIMH (Excerpt)

Depression affects people of all ages but is less common for teenagers than for adults. Approximately 3 to 5 percent of the teen population experiences clinical depression every year. That means among 25 friends, 1 could be clinically depressed. (Source: excerpt from What to do When a Friend is Depressed: NIMH)

Prevelance statistics for Depression:

The following statistics relate to the prevalence of Depression:

  • 6.5% of women have a major depressive disorder in the US (National Institute of Mental Health, NIH)
  • 3.3% of men have a major depressive disorder in the US (National Institute of Mental Health, NIH)
  • 6.7 million women have a major depressive disorder in the US 1998 (National Institute of Mental Health, NIH)
  • 3.2 million men have a major depressive disorder in the US 1998 (National Institute of Mental Health, NIH)
  • 4-5% of population have major depression in Canada (National Population Health Survey, Health Canada)
  • 317,000 men self-reported having anxiety-related problems in Australia 2001 (ABS 2001 National Health Survey, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • 4.5% of population self-reported having anxiety-related problems in Australia 2001 (ABS 2001 National Health Survey, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • more statistics...»

More Statistics about Depression:

  • Hospitalization statistics
  • Cost statistics
  • All statistics for Depression

    Medical news summaries about prevalence of Depression:

    The following medical news items are relevant to the prevalence of Depression:

    About prevalence and incidence statistics:

    The term 'prevalence' of Depression usually refers to the estimated population of people who are managing Depression at any given time. The term 'incidence' of Depression refers to the annual diagnosis rate, or the number of new cases of Depression diagnosed each year. Hence, these two statistics types can differ: a short-lived disease like flu can have high annual incidence but low prevalence, but a life-long disease like diabetes has a low annual incidence but high prevalence. For more information see about prevalence and incidence statistics.

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