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Diseases » Type 1 diabetes » Inheritance
 

Inheritance and Genetics of Type 1 diabetes

Type 1 diabetes: Genetics Information

Genetics of Type 1 diabetes: Type 1 diabetes is what is known as a 'complex trait', which means that mutations in several genes likely contribute to the disease. For example, it is now known that the insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM1) locus on chromosome 6 may harbor at least one susceptibility gene for Type 1 diabetes. Exactly how a mutation at this locus adds to patient risk is not clear, although a gene maps to the region of chromosome 6 that also has genes for antigens (the molecules that normally tell the immune system not to attack itself). In Type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system mounts an immunological assault on its own insulin and the pancreatic cells that manufacture it. However, the mechanism of how this happens is not yet understood.

About 10 loci in the human genome have now been found that seem to confer susceptibility to Type 1 diabetes. Among these are 1) a gene at the locus IDDM2 on chromosome 11 and 2) the gene for glucokinase (GCK), an enzyme that is key to glucose metabolism which helps modulate insulin secretion, on chromosome 7. (Source: Genes and Disease by the National Center for Biotechnology)

About inheritance and genetics:

Inheritance of Type 1 diabetes refers to whether the condition is inherited from your parents or "runs" in families. The level of inheritance of a condition depends on how important genetics are to the disease. Strongly genetic diseases are usually inherited, partially genetic diseases are sometimes inherited, and non-genetic diseases are not inherited. For general information, see Introduction to Genetics.

 

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