Assessment
Questionnaire

Have a symptom?
See what questions
a doctor would ask.
 
Diseases » Type 2 diabetes » Glossary
 

Glossary for Type 2 diabetes

  • Abdominal Pain: A condition which is characterized by the sensation of pain that is located in the abdomen
  • Acanthosis nigricans: It is a brown to black, poorly defined, velvety hyperpigmentation of the skin usually present in the posterior and lateral folds of the neck, the axilla, groin, umbilicus and other areas.
  • Acromegaly: A hormonal disorder involving excess growth hormone production by the pituitary gland.
  • Acute Pancreatitis: Sudden severe inflammation of the pancreas causing digestive complaints.
  • Athlete's foot: Fungal skin condition typically of feet or toes.
  • Autoimmune Diabetes Insipidus: Autoimmune disorder leading to diabetes insipidus.
  • Autonomic neuropathy: A disorder of the nervous system concerned with regulation of activity of cardiac muscle, smooth muscle, and glands, usually restricted to the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems
  • Birth symptoms: Symptoms related to childbirth.
  • Blepharoptosis: Droopy upper eyelid. The condition may be caused by such things as stroke, brain tumor, diabetes and myasthenia gravis.
  • Breathing difficulties: Various types of breathing difficulty (dyspnea).
  • Cataracts: Cloudy areas on the eye's cornea interfering with vision.
  • Cerebrovascular Conditions: Conditions of the brain's blood vessels including stroke.
  • Chronic Pancreatitis: Chronic ongoing inflammation of the pancreas causing digestive complaints.
  • Congenital conditions: Any condition that you are born with such as birth defects or genetic diseases.
  • Cushing's disease: A condition of hyperadrenocorticism which is secondary to excessive pituitary secretion of ACTH. Cushing's disease is different to Cushing's syndrome which refers to the effects of glucocorticoid excess from any cause.
  • Cushing's syndrome: A rare syndrome where excessive secretion of corticosteroids by the adrenal cortex leads to a variety of symptoms. Hormone-secreting adrenal or pituitary tumors are often the cause of the excessive corticosteroid secretion.
  • Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is a hereditary disease affecting the exocrine (mucus) glands of the lungs, liver, pancreas, and intestines, causing progressive disability due to multisystem failure.
  • Dehydration: Loss of fluids in the body
  • Dental symptoms: Symptoms affecting teeth or mouth area.
  • Diabetes: Failing or reduced ability of the body to handle sugars.
  • Diabetes Insipidus: Rare pituitary disorder often affecting the kidneys.
  • Diabetes-like conditions: Medical conditions that appear to be similar to diabetes.
  • Diabetic Diarrhea: Diarrhea that occurs in diabetics as a result of the damage done by diabetes to the digestive system. Digestive system damage is caused by intestinal neuropathy (damage to intestinal nerves) or bacterial overgrowth or both.
  • Diabetic Gastroparesis: Gastroparesis is a diabetic complication that occurs from neuropathy of the stomach nerve (called the "vagus nerve"). This causes digestive difficulties as the food starts to move too slowly through the stomach.
  • Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Life-threatening complication of high blood sugars and diabetes.
  • Diabetic Lens Osmosis: Eye lens vision changes due to diabetic sugars; usually reversible.
  • Diabetic Nephropathy: Kidney disease from diabetic blood sugars.
  • Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Diabetic nerve damage affecting toes, feet, and sometimes hands.
  • Diabetic Retinopathy: Diabetic retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye disease and a leading cause of blindness in American adults. It is caused by changes in the blood vessels of the retina.
  • Diabetic neuropathy: Nerve damage from diabetes affecting any body part; most commonly feet.
  • Digestive symptoms: Any symptoms affecting the digestive tract.
  • Dizziness: Feelings of lightheadedness or giddiness.
  • Endocrine system conditions: Medical conditions affecting the endocrine systems, such as the related hormones or glands.
  • Eye neuropathy: Neuropathy of the eye nerves
  • Eye symptoms: Symptoms affecting the eye
  • Female infertility: Infertility that affects the female
  • Foot symptoms: Symptoms affecting one or both feet
  • Fructosuria: A rare harmless asymptomatic condition caused by a lack of the liver enzyme called fructokinase which is needed to turn fructose into glycogen.
  • Gastroparesis: Slow stomach emptying from stomach nerve damage
  • Gestational diabetes: Diabetes that occurs in pregnant women, usually resolving after birth.
  • Gigantism: A rare endocrine disorder where excess growth hormone is produced prior to puberty.
  • Glomerulonephritis: Kidney disease where the kidney's have problems removing waste material and excessive fluid.
  • Hand neuropathy: Neuropathy (nerve damage) affecting the hands
  • Healing symptoms: Impaired healing of body damage.
  • Heart complications: Any complication that relates to the heart
  • Heart disease: Any of various heart conditions.
  • Heart symptoms: Symptoms affecting the heart
  • Hemochromatosis: Excess of iron leading to problems with joints, liver, heart and pancreas.
  • Hemochromatosis-related diabetes: A single-gene disease that causes iron accumulation in the tissues of the body. Diabetes is a primary complication if hemochromatosis goes untreated. Hemochromatosis is sometimes referred to as "bronze diabetes."
  • Hereditary Hemochromatosis: A genetic disorder where too much iron is absorbed from food and it is stored in various parts of the body which can cause damage. There are 4 types of hemochromatosis and they are distinguished by age of onset, genetic cause and type of inheritance. Some sufferers may be asymptomatic.
  • High Cholesterol: High levels of blood cholesterol, triglycerides, or other lipids.
  • Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Syndrome: Life-threatening complication of high blood sugars and diabetes.
  • Hyperinsulinemia: High insulin levels in the blood
  • Hypertension: High blood pressure
  • Hyperthyroidism: Too much thyroid hormone production.
  • Hypoglycemia: Low blood sugar level
  • Impaired glucose tolerance: Mild glucose metabolism problems not severe enough to be called diabetes.
  • Impotence: Inability to attain or sustain an erection.
  • Insulin Resistance: The resistance of the body to insulin
  • Kidney symptoms: Symptoms affecting one or both kidneys.
  • Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults: Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a genetically-linked, hereditary autoimmune disorder that results in the body mistaking the pancreas as foreign and responding by attacking and destroying the insulin-producing beta islet cells of the pancreas. Simply stated, autoimmune disorders, including LADA, are an "allergy to self."
  • MODY diabetes: Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young affects approximately one or two per cent of people who have diabetes, and may often go unrecognised in its early stages. It is a form of diabetes that develops before the patient reaches 25. It also runs in families, and can pass from one generation to the next. MODY does not always require insulin treatment.
  • MODY syndrome: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. The diabetes results due to genetic mutations which leads to dysfunctional insulin-producing pancreatic cells. There are 6 different genetic mutations that can cause this type of diabetes.
  • MODY syndrome, type 1: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 1 is due to a mutation of the HNF4A gene on chromosome 20.
  • MODY syndrome, type 2: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 2 is due to a mutation of the glucokinase gene on chromosome 7. This particular type is quite mild and usually only discovered incidentally or may become evident during pregnancy.
  • MODY syndrome, type III: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 3 is due to a mutation of the hepatic transcriptor factor-1 gene on chromosome 12q24.2. The hyperglycemia in this form of the condition tends to increase with time and hence eventually requires treatment in the form of medication in many patients.
  • MODY syndrome, type IV: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 4 is due to a mutation of the insulin promoter factor-1 gene on chromosome 13q12.1.
  • MODY syndrome, type V: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 5 is due to a mutation of the hepatic transcriptor factor-2 gene on chromosome 17cen-q21.3.
  • MODY syndrome, type VI: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 6 is due to a mutation of the NEUROD1 gene on chromosome 2q32.
  • MODY syndrome, type VII: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 7 is due to a mutation of the KLF11 gene on chromosome 2p25.
  • MODY syndrome, type VIII: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 8 is due to a genetic mutation on chromosome 9q34.3.
  • Maternally inherited diabetes and deafness: A rare disorder characterized by deafness associated with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.
  • Metabolic Syndrome: A common body syndrome with the "deadly quartet" of major conditions: obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and high lipids.
  • Mononeuritis multiplex: A rare neurological condition where nerve damage occurs at more than one site. Nerve damage can result from conditions such as diabetes mellitus, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and blood vessel diseases.
  • Mouth conditions: Any condition that affects the mouth
  • Neuropathy: Peripheral neuropathy is the term for damage to nerves of the peripheral nervous system, which may be caused either by diseases of the nerve or from the side-effects of systemic illness.
  • No symptoms: The absence of noticable symptoms.
  • Obesity: An increase in the body weight greater than that required for normal function that is characterised by the accumulation of excessive fat
  • Oral thrush: Candida fungal infection of the mouth.
  • Osmotic diuresis: increased urination caused by the presence of certain substances in the small tubes of the kidneys.
  • Pancreas conditions: Any condition that affects the pancreas
  • Pancreatitis: Inflammation of the pancreas causing digestive complaints.
  • Peripheral neuropathy: Peripheral neuropathy is the term for damage to nerves of the peripheral nervous system, which may be caused either by diseases of the nerve or from the side-effects of systemic illness.
  • Pheochromocytoma: Pheochromocytoma is a neuroendocrine tumor of the medulla of the adrenal glands (originating in the chromaffin cells), or extra-adrenal chromaffin tissue that failed to involute after birth and secretes excessive amounts of catecholamines, usually epinephrine and norepinephrine.
  • Physical inactivity: When an individual is physically inactive
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disorder that affects approximately 5% of all women.
  • Pregnancy symptoms: Symptoms related to pregnancy.
  • Prostate Cancer: Cancer of the prostate.
  • Proteinuria: Protein in the urine
  • Proximal muscle weakness: Weakness of the proximal muscles
  • Radiculopathy: A condition characterized by disease of the nerve roots
  • Rash: General name for any type of skin inflammation.
  • Retinal detachment: Partial or total detachment of retina from the back of the eye.
  • Sexual neuropathy: Nerve damage resulting in reduced sexual function in men or women
  • Skin infections: Infection or inflammation of the skin.
  • Somatostatinoma: A very rare disorder where tumors in glands that produce somatostatin affect the secretion of the hormone. The tumor mainly occurs in the pancreas but can also occur in the intestinal tract.
  • Storm syndrome: A rare progressive genetic disorder characterized by premature aging and heart disease which results in premature death.
  • Stroke: Serious brain event from bleeding or blood clots.
  • Toxemia: A medical condition that occurs when there is a release of toxins from bacteria within the bloodstream
  • Transient Ischemic Attack: Temporary disturbance of blood supply to a restricted area of the brain, resulting in brief neurologic dysfunction that persists, by definition, for less than 24 hours.
  • Type 1 diabetes: Severe insulin-treated diabetes typically occurring in young people.
  • Ulcer: A local defect in the mucosa
  • Under-diagnosed conditions: Any medical condition that is undiagnosed
  • Vaginal Dryness: Vaginal dryness interfering with sex.
  • Vague symptoms: Vague, unclear, mild or non-specific symptoms
  • Vascular neuropathy: Neuropathy affecting the nerves controlling blood vessels
  • Weight Gain: An increase in weight for any reason.
  • Weight loss: Loss of body weight.

 

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use. Information provided on this site is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information on this site is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs. Please see our Terms of Use.

Home | Symptoms | Diseases | Diagnosis | Videos | Tools | Forum | About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Site Map | Advertise