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Diseases » Diabetes » Summary
 

What is Diabetes?

What is Diabetes?

Diabetes, also known as diabetes mellitus, is a general term for a variety of different metabolic disorders that ...more »

  • Diabetes: Failing or reduced ability of the body to handle sugars.
  • Diabetes: any of several metabolic disorders marked by excessive urination and persistent thirst.
    Source - WordNet 2.1

Diabetes: Introduction

Types of Diabetes:

Types of Diabetes:

Broader types of Diabetes:

How many people get Diabetes?

Prevalance of Diabetes: 16 million Americans with 10.3 million diagnosed and 8.1 million women (NWHIC); 65 per 1000 - NHIS95; 8 million - perhaps 16 million if include not-yet-diagnosed.
Prevalance Rate of Diabetes: approx 1 in 17 or 5.88% or 16 million people in USA [about data]
Incidence (annual) of Diabetes: approximately 798,000 new cases diagnosed annually in USA (CDC-OC)
Incidence Rate of Diabetes: approx 1 in 340 or 0.29% or 798,000 people in USA [about data]
Undiagnosed prevalence of Diabetes: 5.7 million Americans (based on NWHIC)
Undiagnosed prevalence rate of Diabetes: approx 1 in 47 or 2.10% or 5.7 million people in USA [about data]
Worldwide prevalence: 135 million cases worldwide 1995
Prevalance of Diabetes: According to recent estimates, the prevalence of diabetes in the United States is predicted to be 8.9 percent of the population by 2025. (Source: excerpt from Diabetes Overview: NIDDK) ... About 16 million Americans have diabetes, but only about 10 million have been diagnosed. (Source: excerpt from Facts About Diabetes: CDC-OC)
Incidence of Diabetes: Approximately 798,000 new cases of diabetes are diagnosed annually in the United States. (Source: excerpt from Facts About Diabetes: CDC-OC) ... New cases diagnosed per year: 798,000. (Source: excerpt from Diabetes Statistics in the United States: NIDDK)

Who gets Diabetes?

Patient Profile for Diabetes: Most commonly overweight over 40's with Type 2 diabetes; infants, children or teenagers typically have Type 1 diabetes.

Profile for Diabetes: Most common in older people, overweight and sedentary people, African Americans, Alaska Natives, American Indians, Asian and Pacific Islander Americans, and Hispanic Americans. (Source: excerpt from Diabetes Overview: NIDDK)

Gender Profile for Diabetes: About equal males and females.

Gender Profile for Diabetes: Prevalence of diabetes by sex in people 20 years or older* Men: 7.5 million. 8.2 percent of all men have diabetes.

Women: 8.1 million. 8.2 percent of all women have diabetes.

*These figures do not include the approximately 123,000 cases of diabetes in children and teenagers in the United States. (Source: excerpt from Diabetes Statistics in the United States: NIDDK)

Racial Information for Diabetes: Prevalence of diabetes by race/ethnicity in people 20 years or older Non-Hispanic whites: 11.3 million. 7.8 percent of all non-Hispanic whites have diabetes.

Non-Hispanic blacks: 2.3 million. 10.8 percent of all non-Hispanic blacks have diabetes. On average, non-Hispanic blacks are 1.7 times as likely to have diabetes as non-Hispanic whites of similar age.

Mexican Americans: 1.2 million. 10.6 percent of all Mexican Americans have diabetes. On average, Mexican Americans are 1.9 times as likely to have diabetes as non-Hispanic whites of similar age.

Other Hispanic/Latino Americans:On average, Hispanic/Latino Americans are almost twice as likely to have diabetes as non-Hispanic whites of similar age. (Sufficient data are not currently available to derive more specific estimates.)

American Indians and Alaska Natives: 9 percent of American Indians and Alaska Natives have diagnosed diabetes. On average, American Indians and Alaska Natives are 2.8 times as likely to have diagnosed diabetes as non-Hispanic whites of similar age.

Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders: Prevalence data for diabetes among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are limited. Some groups within this population are at increased risk for diabetes. For example, data collected from 1988 to 1995 suggest that Native Hawaiians are twice as likely to have diagnosed diabetes as white residents of Hawaii. (Source: excerpt from Diabetes Statistics in the United States: NIDDK)

How serious is Diabetes?

Prognosis of Diabetes: Good in the short-term, possibility of severe complications later in life.
Complications of Diabetes: see complications of Diabetes
Average life years lost for Diabetes: 13.8 years (SEER)1; 15.4 in North Carolina2; 2.1 average YPLL/person for diabetes (underlying cause of death) in Michigan3.
Deaths for Diabetes: 71,372 deaths in USA 2001 (CDC); 68,399 annual deaths or 2.9% of deaths (CDC/1999)
Cause of death rank for Diabetes: 6th leading cause of death in 1999 and 2000 (CDC).

What causes Diabetes?

Causes of Diabetes: see causes of Diabetes
Cause of Diabetes: Either reduced insulin production or poor insulin metabolism, depending on subtype.
Risk factors for Diabetes: see risk factors for Diabetes

What are the symptoms of Diabetes?

Symptoms of Diabetes: see symptoms of Diabetes

Complications of Diabetes: see complications of Diabetes

Can anyone else get Diabetes?

More information: see contagiousness of Diabetes
Inheritance: see inheritance of Diabetes

Diabetes: Testing

Diagnostic testing: see tests for Diabetes.

Misdiagnosis: see misdiagnosis and Diabetes.

How is it treated?

Doctors and Medical Specialists for Diabetes: General practitioner, Primary care physician, Diabetologist, Ophthalmologist, Cardiologist, Endocrionologist, Rheumatologist, Neurologist, Retina specialist, General surgeon, Podiatrist, Otolaryngologist, Dermatologist, Nephrologist, Orthopaedic surgeon, Vascular surgeon, Genetic disease specialist, Pediatrician, Family counselor, Psychologist, Geriatrician ; see also doctors and medical specialists for Diabetes.
Treatments for Diabetes: see treatments for Diabetes
Prevention of Diabetes: see prevention of Diabetes
Research for Diabetes: see research for Diabetes

Society issues for Diabetes

Costs of Diabetes: DCCT researchers estimate that intensive management doubles the cost of managing diabetes because of increased visits to a health care professional and the need for more frequent blood testing at home. However, this cost is offset by the reduction in medical expenses related to long-term complications and by the improved quality of life of people with diabetes. (Source: excerpt from Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT): NIDDK)

Cost statistics for Diabetes: The following are statistics from various sources about costs and Diabetes:

  • $132 billion in direct and indirect costs in America (CBCF Health Organisation, 2004)
  • $9 billion dollars annually in Canada (Health Canada)
  • 8,304 prescriptions for diabetes in Canada 1998 (Intercontinental Medical Statistics Canada,1998)
  • Estimated lifetime cost for Type 1 diabetes is about $190,000 in Australia 1993-94 (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2003)
  • Estimated lifetime cost for Type 2 diabetes is about $25,000 in Australia 1993-94 (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2003)
  • more statistics...»


Hospitalization statistics for Diabetes: The following are statistics from various sources about hospitalizations and Diabetes:
  • 562,000 hospital discharges occurred for diabetes in the US 2001 (2001 National Hospital Discharge Survey, NCHS, CDC)
  • 0.53% (68,232) of hospital episodes were for diabetes mellitus in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 78% of hospital consultations for diabetes mellitus required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 54% of hospital episodes for diabetes mellitus were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • more statistics...»


Physician office visit statistics for Diabetes: The following are statistics from various sources about physician office visits and Diabetes:
  • 26.9 million visits were made to a physician’s office for diabetes in the US 2001 (National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: 2001 Summary, NCHS, CDC)
  • 2.6 million visits were made to a hospital outpatient department for diabetes in the US 2001 (National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: 2001 Summary, NCHS, CDC)
  • 12,502,000 people visited a physician’s office primarily for diabetes mellitus in the US 2001 (National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: 2001)
  • more statistics...»

Organs Affected by Diabetes:

Organs and body systems related to Diabetes include:

Name and Aliases of Diabetes

Main name of condition: Diabetes

Other names or spellings for Diabetes:

Diabetes Mellitus, Sugar Diabetes

DM
Source - WordNet 2.1

Diabetes: Related Conditions

Research the causes of these diseases that are similar to, or related to, Diabetes:



Footnotes:
1. SEER Cancer Statistics Review 1975-2000, National Cancer Institute (NCI)
2. Years of Potential Life Lost in North Carolina, NCMJ March/April 2002, Volume 63, Number 2
3. Division for Vital Records and Health Statistics, MDCH, Michigan, USA
 

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