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Diets » Arthritis Diet
 

Arthritis Diet

Introduction: Arthritis Diet

There are many claims of certain foods and "miracle" herbal supplements that will relieve, even cure, the painful symptoms of arthritis. Many of these claims do not have scientific studies to back them up and some are pure frauds that prey on the desperation of people who must live with an often debilitating condition and are not treated adequately for the pain of arthritis. Many of these products may actually be harmful. Some of the specific diets that are known to have harmful side effects include those that rely on large doses of alfalfa, copper salts or zinc, or the so-called immune power diet or the low-calorie/low-fat/low-protein diet. There is evidence however, that excessive weight and the type of diet eaten may influence symptoms of certain types of arthritis and related conditions, according to the Arthritis Foundation. Research has shown several connections between food, nutritional supplements (vitamins, minerals and omega-3 fatty acids) and certain forms of arthritis or related conditions, such as gout, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and reactive arthritis.

Because there are more than 100 types of arthritis, there is no single supplement or diet that is effective for everyone. However, physicians strongly recommend that people with arthritis or related conditions generally follow a diet based on variety, balance and moderation. This includes eating a variety of healthy foods from all food groups and avoiding those that can interact with your medications. This generally means focusing on lean meats and that are low in cholesterol and saturated fats, fresh fruits and vegetables, carbohydrates made form 100% whole grains, and low-fat dairy products, although recommendations will vary depending on the individual case and diagnosis. Some foods that are fine for some people with some forms of arthritis or arthritis-related conditions may be detrimental to other forms of arthritis or arthritis-related conditions. For example, people with a rare form of arthritis should not eat wheat products, although wheat foods are safe for many other people with arthritis. There are also specific foods that aggravate gout but not other arthritic conditions. Other general guidelines for most people with arthritis include maintaining a healthy weight, exercise and activity appropriate to the specific condition, and moderation in the intake of fats, sugar, alcohol, and salt. It is also vital that people with arthritis or related conditions ensure that they get the recommended daily requirements for vitamins and minerals, especially calcium.

With arthritis or an arthritis-related condition, it is very important to consult with a health care professional before starting on any diet or exercise program. In conjunction with your health care professional, you can best develop a complete, multifaceted plan that can safely and most effectively address your specific case, level of pain, and disease process and your needs, goals, and lifestyle.

Conditions Associated with Arthritis Diet

Conditions associated with Arthritis Diet include:

Foods Excluded Or Restricted From Arthritis Diet

The following foods may be restricted or excluded from Arthritis Diet:

  • Varies depending on specific form of arthritis
  • Restriction or moderation generally recommended for foods containing:
  • Salt
  • Sugar
  • Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Alcohol

Foods Focused On For Arthritis Diet

The following foods may be focused on as part of Arthritis Diet:

  • Varies depending of specific form of arthritis
  • In general a well-balanced diet is recommended, including:
  • Lean meats that are low in cholesterol and saturated fats
  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Carbohydrates made form 100% whole grains, and low-fat dairy products
  • Calcium supplements
  • Vitamin and mineral supplements

Arthritis Diet: Potential Risks Or Complications

The following are potential risks or complications of the diet (Arthritis Diet):

  • Some foods that are fine for some people with some forms of arthritis or arthritis-related conditions may be detrimental to other forms of arthritis or arthritis-related conditions. Consult with your health care provider before staring any supplement, herbal remedy, or diet plan

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