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Food Allergy -- soy

Food Allergy -- soy: Introduction

Food Allergy -- soy: Milk and soy allergies are particularly common in infants and young children. These allergies sometimes do not involve hives and ... more about Food Allergy -- soy.

Food Allergy -- soy: A soy allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to soy or food containing soy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches. More detailed information about the symptoms, causes, and treatments of Food Allergy -- soy is available below.

Symptoms of Food Allergy -- soy

Treatments for Food Allergy -- soy

  • Avoid contact with the allergen, adrenaline injection if anaphylactic reaction occurs, antihistamines, bronchodilators for asthmatic symptoms
  • The central concept of management of food allergy is allergen avoidance. When this is not possible or inadvertent allergen exposure occurs, treatment depends on the nature and severity of the reaction. Treatments include:
    • Dietary modification and allergen avoidance - with education of children, parents and carers.
    • No treatment - if symptoms are mild and self-limiting
    • Antihistamines - Useful for allergic rhinitis and some allergy mediated skin conditions. Not helpful in asthma except for mild seasonal asthma where allergy may be a precipitant.
  • more treatments...»

Home Diagnostic Testing

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Wrongly Diagnosed with Food Allergy -- soy?

Food Allergy -- soy: Complications

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Causes of Food Allergy -- soy

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Food Allergy -- soy: Undiagnosed Conditions

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Misdiagnosis and Food Allergy -- soy

Chronic lung diseases hard to diagnose: Some of the chronic lung diseases are difficult to diagnose. Even the well-knowns conditions such as asthma or lung cancer often fail to be...read more »

Food Allergy -- soy: Research Doctors & Specialists

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Food Allergy -- soy: Rare Types

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Food Allergy -- soy: Animations

Food Allergy -- soy: Broader Related Topics

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Article Excerpts about Food Allergy -- soy

Milk and soy allergies are particularly common in infants and young children. These allergies sometimes do not involve hives and asthma, but rather lead to colic, and perhaps blood in the stool or poor growth. Infants and children are thought to be particularly susceptible to this allergic syndrome because of the immaturity of their immune and digestive systems. Milk or soy allergies in infants can develop within days to months of birth. Sometimes there is a family history of allergies or feeding problems. The clinical picture is one of a very unhappy colicky child who may not sleep well at night. The doctor diagnoses food allergy partly by changing the child's diet. Rarely, food challenge is used.

If the baby is on cow's milk, the doctor may suggest a change to soy formula or exclusive breast milk, if possible. If soy formula causes an allergic reaction, the baby may be placed on an elemental formula. These formulas are processed proteins (basically sugars and amino acids). There are few if any allergens within these materials. The doctor will sometimes prescribe corticosteroids to treat infants with severe food allergies. Fortunately, time usually heals this particular gastrointestinal disease. It tends to resolve within the first few years of life.

Exclusive breast feeding (excluding all other foods) of infants for the first 6 to 12 months of life is often suggested to avoid milk or soy allergies from developing within that time frame. Such breast feeding often allows parents to avoid infant-feeding problems, especially if the parents are allergic (and the infant therefore is likely to be allergic). There are some children who are so sensitive to a certain food, however, that if the food is eaten by the mother, sufficient quantities enter the breast milk to cause a food reaction in the child. Mothers sometimes must themselves avoid eating those foods to which the baby is allergic.

There is no conclusive evidence that breast feeding prevents the development of allergies later in life. It does, however, delay the onset of food allergies by delaying the infant's exposure to those foods that can prompt allergies, and it may avoid altogether those feeding problems seen in infants. By delaying the intro (Source: excerpt from Food Allergy and Intolerances, NIAID Fact Sheet: NIAID)

Related Food Allergy -- soy Info

More information about Food Allergy -- soy

  1. Food Allergy -- soy: Introduction
  2. Symptoms
  3. Causes
  4. Treatments
  5. Misdiagnosis
  6. Home Testing
  7. Types
  8. Complications
 

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