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Glossary for Food-related conditions

  • Ackee Fruit Food poisoning: Unripe ackee fruit contains a chemical called hypoglycin A and B which affect the central nervous system and fatty acid oxidation. Eating the unripe fruit can cause symptoms can occur in as little as two hours but is generally 6 to 48 hours. The ackee fruit is found mainly in Jamaica, West Africa, Central America, Sought Florida, southern California and Hawaii.
  • Acute Nonulcer dyspepsia: Sudden acute indigestion not caused by a peptic ulcer.
  • Aflatoxin B1 exposure: Aflatoxin B1 is a toxin produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aflatoxin B1- Teratogenic Agent: Reports indicate that the use of Aflatoxin B1 during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • Aflatoxin B2 exposure: Aflatoxin B2 is a toxin produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aflatoxin G1 exposure: Aflatoxin G1 is a toxin produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aflatoxin G2 exposure: Aflatoxin G2 is a toxin produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aflatoxin exposure: Aflatoxins are toxins produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aguecheek disease: Patients with liver disease who develop symptoms of dementia after eating lots of protein (meat has a high protein level) due to an intolerance to the nitrogenous compounds in the protein.
  • Amnesic shellfish poisoning: Rare shellfish poisoning sometimes causing amnesia.
  • Anchovy poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some anchovies contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the anchovy does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The anchovies are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Angiostrongyliasis: Infection by a parasitic worm (Angiostrongylus). Infection can occur through eating contaminated raw animals such as snails, slugs, prawns or crabs which act as hosts to these parasites.
  • Anisakiasis: Intestinal infection by a parasitic worm (Anisakidae). Infection usually occurs by eating seafood infected with the larvae.
  • Apple seed poisoning: Apple seeds contain a toxic chemical called amygdalin which can cause serious symptoms if eaten in large quantities. Hospital admission is recommended if more than 50 apple seeds have been consumed.
  • Apricot seed poisoning: Apricot seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the pit remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Most parts of the apricot plant contain the toxic chemical with the highest concentration in young leaves. Different species of apricots have different levels of toxic chemical. Severe symptoms or even death can occur if children consume more than ten kernels or adults consume more than forty kernels. Theories exist that apricot kernels may help cancer sufferers but there has been no scientific studies that have proven this.
  • Arctic bearded seal poisoning: The Arctic Bearded seal is often used as a food source by the arctic inhabitants. Eating the liver and kidneys of the arctic bearded seal can result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases. It is believed that eating more than 100-250 grams of the seal liver can result in human death.
  • Asiatic porpoise poisoning: The Asiatic porpoise is eaten mainly in China. Eating the liver, internal organs and muscle tissue of the Asiatic porpoise can cause poisoning symptoms in humans if sufficient quantities are consumed. The nature of the toxin is unknown but it is believed that some cases result from very high levels of vitamin A in the liver.
  • Asparagus, specific smell hypersensitivity: Eating asparagus results in the excretion of an odorous compound but only some people are actually able to smell this compound. This some people are more sensitive to the smell.
  • Atlantic Poison oak poisoning: Atlantic Poison oak is a tall shrub which has a distinctive leaf shape. It is often found growing in the wild. The leaves have small clumps of hairs on the underside. The plant contains a chemical called urushiol which can cause severe skin irritation in some people.
  • Atlantic mussel food poisoning: Atlantic mussels contain a toxin called domoic acid which can affect nerve tissue. The mussels are found in the North Atlantic and Pacific coast and the Gulf of Mexico.
  • Australian Sea Lion poisoning: The Australian Sea Lion is sometimes used as a food source and is found in the South-Southwest waters of Australia. Eating the liver of the Australian Sea Lion can result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases.
  • Bacillus cereus type I food poisoning: Bacillus cereus is a bacterium that can cause food poisoning symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. There are two types: Type I causes mainly vomiting and is associated with fried rice whereas type II causes mainly diarrhea and is associated with meats, cereals, vegetables and milk.
  • Bacillus cereus type II food poisoning: Bacillus cereus is a bacterium that can cause food poisoning symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. There are two types: Type I causes mainly vomiting and is associated with fried rice whereas type II causes mainly diarrhea and is associated with meats, cereals, vegetables and milk.
  • Beeturia: Some people excrete a beet pigment called betacyanin in the urine after they have consumed beets. People with iron deficiency are more likely to have beet pigments in their urine.
  • Bogorad's syndrome: Spontaneous tearing of the eyes when eating or drinking. Tear production increases when salivation increases. It is most often associated with paralysis of a facial nerve.
  • Bothriocephalosis: Infection with an intestinal parasite. The parasite is a fish tapeworm called Diphyllobothrium latum. Human infection is caused by eating undercooked contaminated fish.
  • Botulism food poisoning: Extremely dangerous food poisoning requiring medical attention, but not always recognized because of its non-abdominal symptoms.
  • Burnett's milk drinker's syndrome: Burnett's milk drinker's syndrome is a condition where the body is too alkaline and the blood contains too much calcium which results in impaired kidney function. It can be caused by drinking large quantities of milk or using too many alkaline antacid remedies. High vitamin D intake can make the condition worse. The people most at risk of this condition tend to be older people (especially women) who are taking calcium supplements as well as calcium carbonate containing remedies to treat dyspepsia.
  • Burnett's syndrome: Burnett's syndrome is a condition where the body is too alkaline and the blood contains too much calcium which results in impaired kidney function. It can be caused by drinking large quantities of milk or using too many alkaline antacid remedies. High vitamin D intake can make the condition worse. The people most at risk of this condition tend to be older people (especially women) who are taking calcium supplements as well as calcium carbonate containing remedies to treat dyspepsia.
  • Caffeine poisoning: Excessive ingestion of caffeine.
  • Campylobacter food poisoning: Common bacterial infection usually from chicken.
  • Campylobacter hylointestinalis infection: Campylobacter hyloinstesinalis is a food borne bacterial infection which may cause mild to severe gastroenteritis. Cattle, pigs, hamsters and deer are the main source of this bacteria.
  • Campylobacter jejuni: Rod shaped bacteria causing diarrhea.
  • Campylobacter jejuni infection: Campylobacter jejuni infection is a common food borne bacterial infection which may vary in severity from mild to severe. Death can occur in severe cases but tends to occur in patients with other existing illnesses such as HIV, cancer or liver disease. The infection can in rare cause infection in other parts of the body such as the appendix, abdominal cavity, central nervous system (meningitis), gallbladder, urinary tract and blood stream. Undercooked chicken is the main source of infection.
  • Campylobacter jejuni subspecies doylei infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Campylobacter family. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Campylobacter laridis infection: Campylobacter laridis is a food borne bacterial infection which may cause mild to severe gastroenteritis in healthy individuals and blood infection in immunocompromised patients.
  • Campylobacter sputorum infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Campylobacter family. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Capillaria philippiensis infection: A fish borne parasite that can infect humans. Transmission most often occurs through ingestion of contaminated fish. Severity of symptoms tend to increase as the number of worms multiply in the intestines. Death can occur if the condition is left untreated.
  • Chicken soup poisoning: The consumption of excessive amounts of chicken soup can result in serious symptoms due to very high salt levels in the body. Children and the elderly are more likely to be affected by the high salt levels of chicken soup however the condition is rarely seen. Chicken soup is often promoted as useful for treating colds, asthma or emaciation.
  • Chinese Restaurant Syndrome: Symptoms caused by consuming food with a high MSG (monosodium glutamate) content. Reactions may range from mild to severe allergic reactions.
  • Cholera: An acute bacterial disease transmitted through food or water contaminated with human faeces. The intestinal infection is caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae.
  • Chronic Nonulcer dyspepsia: Chronic indigestion not caused by a peptic ulcer.
  • Ciguatera poisoning: Rare toxic food poisoning from eating contaminated fish
  • Clonorchiasis: Infection with the Chinese liver fluke called Clonchorchis sinensis. Infection usually results from ingesting contaminated fish and crayfish. The infection primarily affects the liver as the flukes tend to occupy the biliary ducts of the liver. Recurring infections can cause more severe symptoms. Infection with this fluke is endemic in Asia but can occur occasionally in countries such as the US though the source of contamination is food from Asia.
  • Clostridium perfringens food poisoning: Common type of food poisoning.
  • Comly syndrome: High blood levels of methemoglobin due to drinking water from wells which have a high nitrate concentration. It is most often seen in babies who have their formula made up using well water. The disorder may also occur in infants who are fed high nitrat food such as eggplant, spinach, beets and green beans. Infants who are less than three months old lack sufficient enzymes to prevent the problem.
  • Congenital lactase deficiency: A congenital metabolic disorder where a deficiency of an enzyme called lactase impairs the body's ability to digest milk and other products that contain lactose. Symptoms tend to occur soon after consuming such products. The severity of symptoms depends on the degree of lactase deficiency.
  • Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A very rare degenerative brain disease that can be inherited, transmitted (eg in surgical transplants using infected tissue) or as a result of genetic mutations. The condition is fatal.
  • Cryptosporiosis: Contagious parasitic digestive infection
  • Cyclospora cayetanenis food poisoning: Cyclospora cayetanenis is a parasite that can cause food poisoning. Contamination through consuming food and water contaminated through contact with infected feces. Diarrhea is usually the main symptom. The severity of symptoms often depends on the age and underlying health of the patient - the very young and old tend to be more severely affected.
  • Developmental Lactase Deficiency: This form of lactase deficiency occurs in premature infants. Lactase enzyme activity usually develops late in pregnancy so a preterm infant will not yet have developed this enzyme function. The greater the degree of prematurity, the greater the reduction in lactase activity.
  • Diphyllobothriasis: Tapeworm infection from eating undercooked fish.
  • Diphyllobothrium latum infection: A tapeworm infection with a tapeworm species called Diphyllobothrium latum. The infection is called diphyllobothriasis and usually results from eating undercooked contaminated fish. Infections are most common in countries where eating raw fish is common e.g. Japan, North America, Asia and parts of Europe. The severity of symptoms is variable but most infections are asymptomatic. The tapeworm infestation can continue for decades if untreated.
  • E-coli food poisoning: Type of bacterial food poisoning
  • Entamoeba histolytica: Parasitic digestive infection.
  • Enteroaggregative E. Coli infection: A bacterial infection that results from ingesting contaminated food or water and results in diarrhea that tends to last for weeks. It most often causes diarrhea in children in developing countries. Enteroaggregative refers to the grouping nature of the bacterial attack on the intestinal lining.
  • Enterohemorrhagic E. Coli infection: A bacterial infection that results from ingesting contaminated food or water and results in bloody diarrhea. Enterohemorrhagic refers to the intestinal bleeding associated with the infection.
  • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia Coli Infection: An Escherichia Coli infection that occurs in the bowel causing an enterohemorrhagic condition
  • Enteroinvasive E. Coli infection: A type of bacterial infection that results from ingesting contaminated food or water and results in gastroenteritis. Enteroinvasive refers to the invasion of bacteria into the gastrointestinal lining. It tends to occur as occasional outbreaks in developed countries and as endemic infections in developing countries.
  • Enteropathogenic E. Coli infection: A bacterial infection that results from ingesting contaminated food or water and results in watery and sometimes bloody diarrhea. It most often causes diarrhea in infants in developing countries. Contaminated drinking water and meat products are the main source of infection. Enteropathogenic refers to the way that the bacteria use specific proteins to adhere to the intestinal lining.
  • Enterotoxigenic E. Coli infection: A bacterial infection that results from ingesting contaminated food or water and results in diarrhea. It most often causes diarrhea in infants and travelers in underdeveloped countries where there is poor sanitation. Contaminated drinking water, soft cheese and raw vegetables are the main source of infection. Symptoms may vary from mild to severe. Enterotoxigenic refers to the fact that the bacteria produce toxins.
  • Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: Bacterial infection of the digestive system
  • Enteroviruses: Viruses affecting the digestive tract.
  • Ergotamine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ergotamine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Familial Lactase Deficiency: A congenital metabolic disorder where normal amounts of lactase are produced but the lactase is defective and unable to digest milk and other products that contain lactose. Symptoms tend to occur soon after consuming such products.
  • Fascioliasis: A rare parastitic infectious disease caused by liver fluke Fasciola hepatica which can cause blockage of the bile ducts in the liver.
  • Favism: Form of hemolytic anemia that can occur after eating fava beans (broad beans) or walking through a field of the plants. The conditions is inherited.
  • Filefish poisoning (Palytoxin): Palytoxin is a marine toxin found in some filefish from the Philippines and Singapore region. The toxin is extremely potent and death is common in patients who ingest contaminated filefish.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- MSG: An intolerance to MSG is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to a food additive called MSG which is used in a number of foods. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the food additive. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- amines: An intolerance to amines is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to amines which are found naturally in foods such as bananas, pineapples, vegetables, red wine, citrus fruit and many other foods. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the substance. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- chocolate: An intolerance to chocolate is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to chocolate. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize the food. The amount of chocolate required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- citric acid intolerance: An intolerance to citric acid is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to citric acid or foods containing citric acid. Citric acid can be found naturally in foods but is also frequently used as an additive to various foods. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize the food. The amount of citric acid required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- food additives: An intolerance to food additives is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to food additives. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the food additive. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- salicylate: An intolerance to salicylates is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to salicylates which is an ingredient in aspirin but is also found naturally in various fruit, vegetables, herbs and spices. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the salicylate. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- sulphite: An intolerance to sulphite is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to sulphite. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize the substance. The amount of sulphite required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Allergy: A food additive allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive or a food or drink containing to food additive. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- Annatto: Annatto allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a yellow food coloring called annatto which is used as an additive in a number of foods and drinks The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- BHA antioxidants: A BHA antioxidant allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called BHA antioxidant which is used primarily in fats and oils to prevent them spoiling. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- BHT antioxidants: A BHT antioxidant allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called BHT antioxidant which is used primarily in fats and oils to prevent them spoiling. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- Carmine: A carmine allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to carmine which is used as an additive in a number of foods (red yoghurt, red popsicles, red drinks) as well as in some cosmetics The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- amaranth: An amaranth allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a red food coloring called amaranth which is used in a number of foods and drinks. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- antioxidants: An antioxidant allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called antioxidants which is used primarily in fats and oils to prevent them spoiling. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- benzoate: A benzoate allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called benzoate which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- carageenan gum: A carageenan gum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called carageenan gum which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- erythrosine: An erythrosine allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a red food coloring called erythrosine which is used in a number of foods and drinks. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- guar gum: A guar gum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called guar gum which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- gum: A gum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called gum which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- gum acacia: A gum acacia allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called gum acacia which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- gum tragacanth: A gum tragacanth allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called gum traganth (type of gum) which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- lecithin: A lecithin allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called lecithin which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- locust bean gum: A locust bean gum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called locust bean gum which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- quinoline yellow: A quinoline yellow allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a yellow food coloring called quinoline yellow which is used in a number of foods and drinks. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- saffron: A saffron allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a yellow food coloring called saffron which is used as an additive in a number of foods and drinks. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- salicytes: A salicylate allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called salicylate which is used in a number of foods. Salicylates also occur naturally in a wide range of plant foods especially fruits. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- sulphite: A sulphite allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called sulphite which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- sulphite derivative: A sulphite derivative allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called sulphite derivative which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- sunset yellow: A sunset yellow allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a yellow food coloring called sunset yellow which is used in a number of foods and drinks. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- tartrazine: A tartrazine allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to tartrazine which is used as an additive in a number of foods (some breakfast cereals, cake mixes, chocolate chips etc.) The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Additive Allergy -- xanthan gum: A xanthan gum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a food additive called xanthan gum which is used in a number of foods. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients and may range from mild to severe.
  • Food Allergy -- Coriander: A coriander allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to coriander or food containing coriander. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- Linden tea: A linden tea allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to linden tea or food containing linden tea. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- MSG: An MSG allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to MSG or food containing MSG. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- Quorn: A quorn allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to quorn or food containing quorn. Quorn is a type of protein made from a fungus. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- almond: An almond allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to almonds or food containing almonds. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- aniseed: An aniseed allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to aniseed or food containing aniseed. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- apple: An apple allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to apples or food containing apples. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- apricot: An apricot allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to apricots or food containing apricots. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- avocado: An avocado allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to avocados or food containing avocados. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- banana: A banana allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to bananas or food containing bananas. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- barley: A barley allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to barley or food containing barley. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- bean: A bean allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to beans or food containing beans. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- beef: A beef allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to beef. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- beer: A beer allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to beer or food containing beer. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- bell pepper: A bell pepper allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to bell peppers or food containing bell pepper. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- brazil nut: A brazil nut allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to brazil nuts or food containing brazil nuts. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- buckwheat: A buckwheat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to buckwheat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- cabbage: A cabbage allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to cabbage or food containing cabbage. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- carp: A carp (type of fish) allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to carp or food containing carp. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- carrot: A carrot allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to carrots or food containing carrots. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- cashew: A cashew allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to cashews or food containing cashews. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- castor bean: A castor bean allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to castor beans or food containing castor beans. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- celery: A celery allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to celery or food containing celery. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- chamomile tea: A chamomile tea allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to chamomile tea or food containing chamomile. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- cherry: A cherry allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to cherries or food containing cherries. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- chestnut: A chestnut allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to chestnuts or food containing chestnuts. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- chick pea: A chick pea allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to chick peas or food containing chick peas. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- chicken meat: A chicken meat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to chicken meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- cinnamon: A cinnamon allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to cinnamon or food containing cinnamon. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- coconut: A coconut allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to coconuts or food containing coconut. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- codfish: A codfish allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to codfish or food containing codfish. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- crab: A crab allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to crabs or food containing crab. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- crayfish: A crayfish allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to crayfish or food containing crayfish. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- cumin: A cumin allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to cumin or food containing cumin. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- date palm: A date palm allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to date palms or food containing date palms. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- duck meat: A duck meat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to duck meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- fish: A fish allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to fish or food containing fish. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- frog: A frog allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to eating frogs or food containing frogs. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- garbanzo (legume): A garbanzo allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to garbanzo or food containing garbanzo. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- garlic: A garlic allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to garlic or food containing garlic. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- goose meat: A goose meat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to goose meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- hazelnut: A hazelnut allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to hazelnuts or food containing hazelnuts. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- hops: A hop allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to hops or food containing hops. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- kidney bean: A kidney bean allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to kidney bean or food containing kidney bean. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- kiwi fruit: A kiwi fruit allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to kiwi fruit or food containing kiwi fruit. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- lamb: A lamb allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to lamb meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- lentil: A lentil allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to lentils or food containing lentils. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- lettuce: A lettuce allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to lettuce or food containing lettuce. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- lima bean: A lima bean allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to lima beans or food containing lima beans. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- lobster: A lobster allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to lobsters or food containing lobster. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- lychee: A lychee allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to lychee or food containing lychee. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- mackerel: A mackerel allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to mackerel or food containing mackerel. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- meat: A meat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- melon: A melon allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to melons or food containing melons. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- milk: A milk allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to milk or food containing milk. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- mollusk: A mollusk allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to mollusks or food containing mollusk. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- mussel: A mussel allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to mussels or food containing mussels. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- mustard leaf: A mustard leaf allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to mustard leaves or food containing mustard leaves. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- oat: An oat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to oats or food containing oats. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- olive: An olive allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to olives or food containing olives. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- oranges: An orange allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to oranges or food containing oranges. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- papaya: A papaya allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to papaya or food containing papaya. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- paprika: A paprika allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to paprika or food containing paprika. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- parsley: A parsley allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to parsley or food parsley tomatoes. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- pea: A pea allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to peas or food containing peas. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- peach: A peach allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to peach or food containing peach. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- peanuts: A peanut allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to peanuts or food containing peanuts. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- pear: A pear allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pears or food containing pears. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- pecan: A pecan allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pecans or food containing pecans. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- pine nut: A pine nut allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pine nuts or food containing pine nuts. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- pineapple: A pineapple allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pineapples or food containing pineapple. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- plantain: A plantain allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to plantain or food containing plantain. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- plum: A plum allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to plums or food containing plums. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- pork: A pork allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- potato: A potato allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to potato or food containing potato. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- pumpkin: A pumpkin allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pumpkin or food containing pumpkin. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- red meat: A red meat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to red meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- rice: A rice allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to rice or food containing rice. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- rye: A rye allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to rye or food containing rye. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- salmon: A salmon allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to salmon or food containing salmon. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- scallop: A scallop allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to scallops or food containing scallops. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- sesame: A sesame allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to sesame or food containing sesame. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- shellfish: A shellfish allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to shellfish or food containing shellfish. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- shrimp: A shrimp allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to shrimp or food containing shrimp. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- snail: A snail allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to snails or food containing snails. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- soy: A soy allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to soy or food containing soy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- soybean: A soybean allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to soybean or food containing soybean. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- spices: A spice allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spices or food containing spices. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- strawberry: A strawberry allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to strawberries or food containing strawberries. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- sulfite: A sulfite allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to sulfite or food containing sulfite. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- sunflower seeds: A sunflower seed allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to sunflower seeds or food containing sunflower seeds. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- thyme: A thyme allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to thyme or food containing thyme. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- tomato: A tomato allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to tomatoes or food containing tomatoes. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- tree nuts: A tree nut allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to tree nuts or food containing tree nuts. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- tuna: A tuna allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to tuna or food containing tuna. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- turnip: A turnip allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to turnip or food containing turnip. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- vegetable oil: A vegetable oil allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to vegetable oil or food containing vegetable oil. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- walnuts: A walnut allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to walnuts or food containing walnuts. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- wheat: A wheat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to wheat or food containing wheat. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- zucchini: A zucchini allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to zucchini or food containing zucchini. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food intolerances: Any inability to tolerate particular foods.
  • Food poisoning: Poisoning from a substance or microbe in food.
  • Frey Syndrome: A rare neurological disorder that is a complicate from surgery near the parotid glands
  • Frey's syndrome: A rare condition where the ears and/or cheeks become flushed or sweaty upon eating spicy, hot or bitter substances or chocolate. Injury to the facial nerve near the parotic gland causes the condition.
  • Fructose intolerance: An enzyme deficiency that causes toxic symptoms when fructose containing food is ingested.
  • Gempylotoxism: A form of food poisoning caused by eating gempylotoxic fish such as pelagic mackerals from the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific oceans. The oil in the fish can cause diarrhea. Symptoms are generally harmless as the diarrhea tends not to be severe.
  • Giardia: Contagious parasitic digestive infection
  • Gluten allergy: Gluten allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to gluten or foods containing gluten. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches. Gluten allergy is similar to celiac disease - celiac disease only occurs in people with a genetic defect which predisposes them to the condition whereas gluten can occur in anyone but is more common in people who are also prone to other allergies.
  • Gluten ataxia: Ataxia that apparently results from a sensitivity to gluten which is found in grains such as wheat and barley.
  • Gnathostoma Infection: Infection with a type of round worm (Gnathostoma spinigerum and Gnathostoma hispidum). Infection typically occurs through eating undercooked fish or poultry containing the roundworm larvae or by drinking contaminated water. The symptoms are determined by which tissues the worms migrate through. The worms tend to migrate mainly through the skin.
  • Greenland Shark poisoning: Some species of shark are toxic to humans due to the presence of trimethylamine oxide. Poisoning causes mainly neurological symptoms.
  • Heiner syndrome: A disease caused by the precipitation in the blood of antibodies to cow's milk.
  • Helicobacter cinaedi infection: Helicobacter cinaedi is a food borne bacterial infection which may cause mild to severe gastroenteritis.
  • Helicobacter fenneliae infection: Helicobacter fenneliae is a food borne bacterial infection which may cause mild to severe gastroenteritis.
  • Hepatitis A: Contagious viral infection of the liver
  • Hepatitis E: Viral liver infection.
  • Honey intoxication: Food poisoning from the ingestion of honey.
  • Human carcinogen -- Aflatoxins: Exposure to aflatoxins is deemed to be carcinogenic to humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Hypersensitivity to food: any food can cause allergy. There is no allergy-safe diet
  • Hypoglycemia, leucine-induced: A rare disorder where episodes of low blood sugar occurs after eating a meal which contains the protein leucine.
  • IBS associated with giardiasis: IBS is a functional bowel disorder characterized by chronic abdominal pain, discomfort, bloating, and alteration of bowel habits and can follow giardiasis which is a parasitisc infection caused by a single cell organism called giardia Lamblia.
  • Ichthyocrinotoxication: Poisoning that occurs through ingestion of toxic glandular skin secretions of certain fish (moray eel, toadfish, lamprey, hagfish, pufferfish, trunkfish and porcupine fish).
  • Ichthyohepatotoxication: Ichthyohepatotoxication is a condition caused by eating the liver of certain fish. It is believed that the high vitamin A content of the liver leads to vitamin A overdose and the resulting symptoms. Tropical shark livers are associated with this condition.
  • Indigestion: Various eating symptoms of indigestion (dyspepsia)
  • Infant botulism food poisoning: Very dangerous food poisoning needing medical attention.
  • Jamaican vomiting sickness: A fatal reaction to eating unripe ackee fruit.
  • Lathyrism: A condition caused by eating certain legumes from the Lathyrus genus of plants. Some of the spacies involved are Lathyrus sativa, cicera, ochrus and clymenum. The chemicals within the legumes of these plants are toxic to the nerves.
  • Listeriosis: Bacterial food poisoning
  • Marine turtle poisoning: Marine turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning -- Green Sea Turtle: Green Sea turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning -- Hawksbill Turtle: Hawksbill turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning -- Leatherback Turtle: Leatherback turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning -- Loggerhead Turtle: Loggerhead turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning -- Soft-shelled Turtle: Soft-shelled turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Mercury poisoning -- consumption of contaminated fish: Eating fish contaminated with mercury can lead to mercury poisoning in humans. The severity and range of symptoms experienced can vary greatly depending on the level and duration of exposure. Severe poisoning can lead to death. Pregnant women who eat mercury contaminated fish may give birth to infants who suffer symptoms such as ataxia, tremors, seizures, mental retardation and cerebral palsy. An epidemic was reported where hundreds of Japanese villagers suffered mercury poisoning after eating fish contaminated by a nearby factory. Nearly half of the victims eventually died and children born during that period suffered a variety of neurological problems.
  • Metagonimiasis: Infection with a parasitic intestinal fluke called Metagonimus yokogawa. Infection usually occurs when eating undercooked or salted fish which are infected with the parasite. It is most common in the Far East, Siberia, Israel and Spain.
  • Methylcobalamin deficiency cbl G type: An inherited organic acid disorder where an enzyme deficiency (cbl G) impairs the body's ability to break down certain proteins consumed in the diet. This results in a buildup of homocystine which results in harmful affects.
  • Methylmalonic acidemia, Cobalamin B deficiency: An inherited organic acid disorder where an enzyme deficiency (Cobalamin B deficiency) impairs the body's ability to break down certain proteins (methionine, threonine, isoleucine and valine) consumed in the diet. This results in a buildup of glycine and methylmalonic acid which results in harmful affects.
  • Methylmalonic acidemia, cobalamin A deficiency: An inherited organic acid disorder where an enzyme deficiency (Cobalamin A deficiency) impairs the body's ability to break down certain proteins (methionine, threonine, isoleucine and valine) consumed in the diet. This results in a buildup of glycine and methylmalonic acid which results in harmful affects.
  • Methylmalonicaciduria with homocystinuria, cobalamin F: An inherited organic acid disorder where an enzyme deficiency (cbl F) impairs the body's ability to break down certain proteins (methionine, threonine, isoleucine and valine) consumed in the diet. This results in a buildup of methylmalonic acid and homocystine which results in harmful affects.
  • Mexican tea poisoning: Mexican tea is plant that bears elongated clusters of small green flowers and small greenish fruit which contain seeds which are green when fresh and black when dry. The plant has a strong odor. The oil in the seeds contain chemicals (including terpene peroxide ascaride) which are very poisonous and cause death if sufficient quantities are eaten. The oil from the seeds is often used to control worm infestations in livestock.
  • Milk poisoning: Milk poisoning is a condition where the body is too alkaline and the blood contains too much calcium. It can be caused by drinking large quantities of milk or using too many alkaline antacid remedies. High vitamin D intake can make the condition worse. The people most at risk of this condition tend to be older people (especially women) who are taking calcium supplements as well as calcium carbonate containing remedies to treat dyspepsia.
  • Milk-Alkali syndrome: Milk-Alkali syndrome is a condition where the body is too alkaline and the blood contains too much calcium which results in impaired kidney function. It can be caused by drinking large quantities of milk or using too many alkaline antacid remedies. High vitamin D intake can make the condition worse. The people most at risk of this condition tend to be older people (especially women) who are taking calcium supplements as well as calcium carbonate containing remedies to treat dyspepsia.
  • Mycotoxin-induced liver damage -- Aflatoxin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a mycotoxin called Aflatoxin which is a toxin produced by some Aspergillus fungus. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. The toxin is also know to increase the risk of developing liver cancer.
  • Neurotoxic shellfish poisoning: Rare food poisoning from eating contaminated shellfish
  • Nonulcer dyspepsia: Persistent indigestion not caused by a peptic ulcer.
  • Norwalk gastroenteritis: A viral (Norwalk virus) infection that is transmitted through fecal-oral contact which can happen through eating contaminated food or drinking contaminated water. Symptoms are usually relatively mild. The incubation period is 18-72 hours.
  • Palytoxin poisoning: Palytoxin is a marine toxin found in sea anemones and certain crabs and fish (e.g. triggerfish). The toxin is extremely potent and death is common in patients who ingest contaminated fish.
  • Paralytic shellfish poisoning: Rare food poisoning from eating contaminated shellfish
  • Parrotfish poisoning (Palytoxin): Palytoxin is a marine toxin found in some parrotfish from the Philippines and Singapore region. The toxin is extremely potent and death is common in patients who ingest contaminated parrotfish.
  • Peanut Allergy: Allergic reaction brought on by the ingestion of, or exposure to peanuts in a sensitised person
  • Polar bear poisoning: Polar bears are often used as a food source by the arctic inhabitants. Eating the liver and kidneys of the polar bear is believed to result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases. Eating more than 200 grams of Polar bear liver can result in human death however death is considered rare.
  • Pollen food allergy syndrome: A significant number of people with an allergy to pollen also have allergic responses to certain plant foods (usually fruit) which have similar proteins to that found in pollens. Examples of these includes pineapple, avocado, chestnuts, apples, raw carrot, raw celery, melon, peach, pear, plum, kiwi fruit, mango, passionfruit, strawberries, tomato, potato, bell pepper and soy. Symptoms usually only involve the mouth and throat.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Aflatoxin M1: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Aflatoxin M1 has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure. The substance appears to be linked primarily to increased risk of liver cancers. Exposure is most likely to occur through the consumption of milk products that has come from animals which have consumed contaminated feed.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Ochratoxin A: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Ochratoxin A has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure. Ochratoxin A is a toxin produces by mycotoxins which can readily contaminate food.
  • Prion diseases: Various diseases caused by abnormal proteins (prions) in the brain.
  • Psyllium -- adverse effects: The use of psyllium as a diet supplement can cause adverse symptoms.
  • Ptomaine food poisoning: Food poisoning caused by toxic products from bacterial metabolism
  • Red Whelk poisoning: Red Whelk are colorful, carnivorous snail found mainly in Britain and Japan. The salivary gland of some whelks contains tetramine which can cause symptoms in humans if eaten. Raw, cooked or canned whelk can cause poisoning. Red whelk have the highest concentration of toxins in the summer. Whelk is often used as fish bait.
  • Refsum Disease: A metabolic disorder where a deficiency of phytanic acid alpha-hydroxylase results in a buildup of phytanic acid in the body which causes neurological disorders.
  • Ringed seal poisoning: The Ringed seal is often used as a food source by the arctic inhabitants. Eating the liver of the ringed seal can result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases.
  • Rotavirus: Diarrhea-causing virus in infants.
  • Salmonella anatum infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella choleraesuis infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella enteritidis: Type of salmonella food poisoning usually from eggs.
  • Salmonella enteritidis infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella food poisoning: Common type of food poisoning.
  • Salmonella heidelberg infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella hirschfeldii infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella newport infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella paratyphi A infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which causes typhoid fever, with symptoms such as gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella schottmuelleri infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella typhi infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which causes typhoid fever, with symptoms such as gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella typhimurium infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which can result in gastroenteritis, fever or may be asymptomatic. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salt craving: A craving for salt products
  • Sardine poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some sardines contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the sardines does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The sardines are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Scombroid fish poisoning syndrome: Poisoning caused by eating spoiled fish from the scromboid family which includes tuna, mackerel, skipjack, bonito and wahoo.
  • Scombrotoxic fish poisoning: Bacterial food poisoning from eating contaminated fish
  • Seafood allergy: A seafood allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to seafood or food containing seafood. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Secondary Lactase Deficiency: This form of lactase deficiency results from some sort of damage to the intestines either due to a disease or surgery. Some possible causes include untreated celiac disease, long-term use of antibiotics, giardiasis, carcinoid syndrome, HIV enteropathy, gastrectomy and intestinal resection. Lactase enzyme activity usually develops late in pregnancy so a preterm infant will not yet have developed this enzyme function. The greater the degree of prematurity, the greater the reduction in lactase activity.
  • Sei whale poisoning: The Sei whale is eaten in certain parts of Asia. Eating the liver of the Sei whale can cause poisoning symptoms in humans if sufficient quantities are consumed. It is believed that the poisoning results from the very high levels of vitamin A in the liver.
  • Shigella boydii: A form of bacterium
  • Shigella boydii infection: Shigella boydii is a species of bacteria from the Shigella genus. Infection with this bacteria causes diarrhea. The severity of the disease is variable depending on the underlying health of the individual - the young and old tend to be more severely affected. Infection usually occurs through the fecal-oral route. Infection can be transmitted between people unless appropriate hygiene measures are undertaken. Some infected patients are asymptomatic and are those more likely to transmit infection to other people.
  • Shigella dysenteriae infection: Shigella dysenteriae is a species of bacteria from the Shigella genus. Dysenteriae is the most common cause of epidemic dysentery in condensed populations such as refugee camps. Infection with this bacteria causes diarrhea. The severity of the disease is variable depending on the underlying health of the individual - the young and old tend to be more severely affected. Infection usually occurs through the fecal-oral route. Infection can be transmitted between people unless appropriate hygiene measures are undertaken. Some infected patients are asymptomatic and are those more likely to transmit infection to other people.
  • Shigella flexneri: A form of bacterium
  • Shigella flexneri infection: Shigella flexneri is a species of bacteria from the Shigella genus. Flexneri is the most common cause of Shigellosis in the world. Infection with this bacteria causes diarrhea. The severity of the disease is variable depending on the underlying health of the individual - the young and old tend to be more severely affected. Infection usually occurs through the fecal-oral route. Infection can be transmitted between people unless appropriate hygiene measures are undertaken. Some infected patients are asymptomatic and are those more likely to transmit infection to other people.
  • Shigella sonnei: A form of bacterium
  • Shigella sonnei infection: Shigella sonnei is a species of bacteria from the Shigella genus. Sonnei is the most common cause of Shigellosis in the developed world. Infection with this bacteria causes diarrhea. The severity of the disease is variable depending on the underlying health of the individual - the young and old tend to be more severely affected. Infection usually occurs through the fecal-oral route. Infection can be transmitted between people unless appropriate hygiene measures are undertaken. Some infected patients are asymptomatic and are those more likely to transmit infection to other people.
  • Shigellosis: An infectious disease which affects the intestinal tract and is caused by the Shigella bacteria. The condition may be severe, especially in children, but may be asymptomatic in some cases. The disease can be transmitted through fecal-oral contact.
  • Solomon's seal poisoning: Solomon's seal is aherbaceous plant which bears long, unbranched stemsm white floers and hanging blue-black berries. The plant can be found growing in the wild or in gardens as an ornamental plant. The berries contain a chemical called which can cause gastrointestinal symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Spice allergy:
  • Staphylococcal food poisoning: A gastrointestinal disease caused by consuming food or drink contaminated by toxins made by a bacteria called Staphylococcus aureus.
  • Staphylococcus aureus food poisoning: Common type of food poisoning.
  • Taeniasis: An infection with a type of tapeworm
  • Taste abnormalities: Any abnormalities of one's taste
  • Toxic mushrooms -- Anticholinergic: Some mushrooms contain a toxic chemical called ibotenic acid which causes anticholinergic symptoms. Ibotenic acid is converted to muscimol during digestion. The two toxins have opposing actions which results in initial excitation symptoms followed by a prolonged coma-like sleep. Mushroom species from this group include certain species of Amanita sp. - cothurnata, crenulata, frostiana, gemmata, muscaria and pantherina. Eating two to four mushrooms can result in impaired senses and eating more than twenty usually results in death.
  • Toxic mushrooms -- Cholinergic: Some mushrooms contain a toxic chemical called muscarine which causes cholinergic symptoms. Mushroom species from this group include certain species of Clitocype, Inocybe and Mycena. Symptoms usually occur within a few hours and tend to disappear within 24 hours. Fatalities have been reported but not in recent times.
  • Toxic mushrooms -- Gastrointestinal irritant: Some mushrooms contain a chemical which cause gastrointestinal irritation. Mushroom species from this group include certain species of Agaricus, Amanita, Boletus, Entoloma, Gomphus, Lactarius, Omphalotus, Tricholoma, Tylopilus and Verpa.
  • Toxic mushrooms -- Monomethylhydrazine: Some mushrooms contain a toxic chemical called gyromitrin which is converted to monomethylhydrazine after digestion. Mushroom species from this group include certain species of Gyromitra, Helvella, Sarcosphaera and Peziza. Poisoning may occur from inhaling fumes from cooking mushrooms. The amount of toxin varies amongst and within species but some are toxic enough to cause death. Urgent medical attention should be sought if mushroom poisoning is suspected.
  • Toxic mushrooms -- Psychedelic: Some mushrooms contain chemicals called psilocybin and psilocin which produce effects similar to LSD. Mushroom species from this group include certain species of Conocybe syanopus, Conocybe spectabilis, Gymnopilus, Panaeolus, Pluteus, Psilocybe and Stropharia. About five dried mushroom caps can result in hallucinations.
  • Toxic mushrooms -- Renal toxic (orelline): Some mushrooms (Amanita smithiana) contain chemicals (allenic norleucine, chlorocrotyglycine) which can cause kidney damage.
  • Toxic mushrooms -- cyclopeptides: Some mushrooms contain a toxic chemical called cyclopeptide which can cause primarily gastrointestinal symptoms if ingested. Most cases of mushroom poisoning in North America involve cyclopeptide-containing mushrooms. Mushroom species from this group include certain species of Amanita (bisporigera, ocreata, phalloides, suballiacea, tenufolia, verna, virosa), Galerina and Lepiota. One Amanita mushroom cap may result in death in an adult. Poisoning occurs in three phases: gastrointestinal symptoms (within 24 hours of ingestion); remission (up to 72 hours after ingestion); and liver and kidney symptoms (3 to 6 days after ingestion). Poisoning symptoms are more severe in children due to their smaller body size.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Ergotamine: Use of a drug called Ergotamine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Ergotamine tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Trichinosis: Worm infection usually caught from pigs
  • Triggerfish poisoning (Palytoxin): Palytoxin is a marine toxin found in some triggerfish from the Philippines region. The toxin is extremely potent and death is common in patients who ingest contaminated triggerfish.
  • Tropical Reef Crab poisoning: The tropical reef crab is commonly found and eaten in the Indo-Pacific region. These crabs can contain toxic chemicals which can cause severe poisoning in humans if eaten. The best way to avoid poisoning is to not eat these crabs at all.
  • Typhoid fever: Fever from bacterial food poisoning.
  • Typhus: A general name for various arthropod-borne rickettsial infections
  • Variant CJD: New human CJD subtype linked to mad cow disease (BSE).
  • Venerupin shellfish poisoning: The venerupin shellfish can be eaten by humans. The shellfish can become toxic if they consume toxic algae. The shellfish is most commonly found and eaten in Japan but has been introduced into parts of the US. Interestingly, all cases of poisoning have occurred in very localized areas of Japan where they are harvested from lakes. This type of poisoning tends to have a high death rate - up to a third of patients die.
  • Vibrio: An organism of the genus Vibrio or other spiral motile organism
  • Vibrio infection -- Vibrio fluvialis: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio fluvialis. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection -- Vibrio furnissii: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio furnissii. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia and wound infection is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection -- Vibrio holisae: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio holisae. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection -- Vibrio mimicus: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio mimicus. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia and wound infection is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio mimicus food poisoning: Ingestion of food or water contaminated with a particular bacteria (Vibrio mimicus).
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus: Bacteria commonly infecting oysters and seafood.
  • Walrus poisoning: The walrus is used as a food source in some parts of the world. Eating the liver of the walrus can result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases.
  • Water Intoxication: Excessive water intake can lead to water intoxication and ultimately death.
  • Wheat intolerance: A condition that is characterised by an intolerance to wheat
  • White whale poisoning: The White whale is used as a food source in the Arctic. The white whale may cause toxicity if the meat and visceral organs eaten by humans in sufficient quantities.
  • Woringer syndrome: A disease where abnormal fat processing by the body results in symptoms such as headache, vomiting and fatigue after eating a meal containing fat.
  • Xanthid crab poisoning (Palytoxin): Palytoxin is a marine toxin found in some xanthid crabs from the Philippines and Singapore region. The toxin is extremely potent and death is common in patients who ingest contaminated xanthid crabs.

 

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