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Diseases » Gout » Introduction
 

Gout

Gout: Introduction

Gout: Gout is one of the most painful rheumatic diseases. It results from deposits of needle-like crystals of uric acid in the connective tissue, joint ... more about Gout.

Gout: Painful joints, most commonly the big toe. More detailed information about the symptoms, causes, and treatments of Gout is available below.

Symptoms of Gout

Treatments for Gout

Home Diagnostic Testing

Home medical testing related to Gout:

Wrongly Diagnosed with Gout?

Gout: Related Patient Stories

Gout: Deaths

Read more about Deaths and Gout.

Alternative Treatments for Gout

Alternative treatments or home remedies that have been listed in various sources as possibly beneficial for Gout may include:

  • Hydration with distilled water
  • Anthocyanocides (found in wild and black cherries)
  • Black cherry extract
  • Electronic acupuncture of the ear
  • Avoid high-purine foods (organ meats, sardines, anchovies, asparagus, mushrooms and beans)
  • more treatments »

Types of Gout

  • Podagra - the name for gout in the big toe; about 75% of cases.
  • Subtype categories based on progression and severity:
    • Asymptomatic hyperuricemia - early stage without any symptoms.
    • Acute gout - also called acute gouty arthritis; sudden attacks of gout symptoms of joint pain and swelling.
    • Intercritical gout - the symptom-free stage between attacks of acute gout.
  • more types...»

Diagnostic Tests for Gout

Test for Gout in your own home

Click for Tests
  • Hyperuricemia test - not a very useful test as some people with gout
  • Are negative and there are many false positives of healthy people with elevated uric acid
  • Joint fluid test - examination for crystals; also test for bacteria to rule out infection.
  • more tests...»

Gout: Complications

Review possible medical complications related to Gout:

Causes of Gout

More information about causes of Gout:

Disease Topics Related To Gout

Research the causes of these diseases that are similar to, or related to, Gout:

Gout: Undiagnosed Conditions

Commonly undiagnosed diseases in related medical categories:

Misdiagnosis and Gout

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Gout: Research Doctors & Specialists

Research related physicians and medical specialists:

Other doctor, physician and specialist research services:

Hospitals & Clinics: Gout

Research quality ratings and patient safety measures for medical facilities in specialties related to Gout:

Choosing the Best Hospital: More general information, not necessarily in relation to Gout, on hospital performance and surgical care quality:

Gout: Rare Types

Rare types of diseases and disorders in related medical categories:

Latest Treatments for Gout

Gout: Animations

Prognosis for Gout

Prognosis for Gout: Good prognosis with adequate treatment.

Research about Gout

Visit our research pages for current research about Gout treatments.

Clinical Trials for Gout

The US based website ClinicalTrials.gov lists information on both federally and privately supported clinical trials using human volunteers.

Some of the clinical trials listed on ClinicalTrials.gov for Gout include:

Statistics for Gout

Gout: Broader Related Topics

Gout Message Boards

Related forums and medical stories:

User Interactive Forums

Read about other experiences, ask a question about Gout, or answer someone else's question, on our message boards:

Article Excerpts about Gout

Questions and Answers About Gout: NIAMS (Excerpt)

Gout is one of the most painful rheumatic diseases. It results from deposits of needle-like crystals of uric acid in the connective tissue, joint spaces, or both. These deposits lead to inflammatory arthritis, which causes swelling, redness, heat, pain, and stiffness in the joints. Arthritis is a term that is often used to refer to the more than 100 different rheumatic diseases that affect the joints, muscles, and bones, and may also affect other connective tissues. Gout accounts for about 5 percent of all cases of arthritis. Pseudogout, also a crystal-induced arthritis, is a condition with similar symptoms that results from deposits of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals in the joints. It is sometimes called calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease, crystal deposition disease, or chondrocalcinosis. (Source: excerpt from Questions and Answers About Gout: NIAMS)

Questions and Answers About Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases: NIAMS (Excerpt)

This type of arthritis results from deposits of needle-like crystals of uric acid in the connective tissue, joint spaces, or both. Uric acid is a normal breakdown product of purines, which are present in body tissues and in many foods. Usually, uric acid passes through the kidney into urine and is eliminated. If the concentration of uric acid in the blood rises above normal levels, sodium urate crystals may form in the tendons, ligaments, and cartilage of the joints. These needle-like crystals cause inflammation, swelling, and pain in the affected joint. The joint most commonly affected is the big toe. (Source: excerpt from Questions and Answers About Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases: NIAMS)

Obesity: NWHIC (Excerpt)

Gout is a joint disease caused by high levels of uric acid in the blood. Uric acid sometimes forms crystals that are deposited in the joints. Gout is more common in overweight people. If you have a history of gout, check with your doctor before trying to lose weight. Some diets may lead to an attack of gout in people who have high levels of uric acid or who have had gout before. (Source: excerpt from Obesity: NWHIC)

Arthritis Advice -- Age Page -- Health Information: NIA (Excerpt)

Gout occurs most often in older men. It affects the toes, ankles, elbows, wrists, and hands. An acute attack of gout is very painful. Swelling may cause the skin to pull tightly around the joint and make the area red or purple and very tender. Medicines can stop gout attacks, as well as prevent further attacks and damage to the joints. (Source: excerpt from Arthritis Advice -- Age Page -- Health Information: NIA)

Definitions of Gout:

Arthritis, especially of the great toe, as a result of gout. Acute gouty arthritis often is precipitated by trauma, infection, surgery, etc. The initial attacks are usually monoarticular but later attacks are often polyarticular. - (Source - Diseases Database)

A painful inflammation of the big toe and foot caused by defects in uric acid metabolism resulting in deposits of the acid and its salts in the blood and joints - (Source - WordNet 2.1)

 

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