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Diseases » HIV/AIDS » Prevalence
 

Prevalence and Incidence of HIV/AIDS

Prevalance of HIV/AIDS:

900,000 Americans (NIAID, quarter are unaware) ... see also overview of HIV/AIDS.

Prevalance Rate:

approx 1 in 302 or 0.33% or 900,000 people in USA [Source statistic for calcuation: "900,000 Americans (NIAID, quarter are unaware)" -- see also general information about data sources]

Incidence (annual) of HIV/AIDS:

approximately 40,000 annual cases in USA (NIAID) ... see also overview of HIV/AIDS.

Incidence Rate:

approx 1 in 6,800 or 0.01% or 40,000 people in USA [Source statistic for calcuation: "approximately 40,000 annual cases in USA (NIAID)" -- see also general information about data sources]

Incidence extrapolations for USA for HIV/AIDS:

40,000 per year, 3,333 per month, 769 per week, 109 per day, 4 per hour, 0 per minute, 0 per second. [Source statistic for calculation: "approximately 40,000 annual cases in USA (NIAID)" -- see also general information about data sources]

Undiagnosed prevalence of HIV/AIDS:

estimated 225,000 Americans (based on NIAID 900,000 prevalence with quarter undiagnosed). ... see also misdiagnosis of HIV/AIDS.

Undiagnosed prevalence rate:

approx 1 in 1,208 or 0.08% or 225,000 people in USA [about data] ... Note: this rate calculation uses the following statistic: estimated 225,000 Americans (based on NIAID 900,000 prevalence with quarter undiagnosed).

Prevalance of HIV/AIDS:

From the beginning of the epidemic through the end of 1998, 5,237 American children under age 13 had been reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as living with HIV/AIDS. (Source: excerpt from Backgrounder -- HIV Infection in Infants and Children: NIAID) ... More than 700,000 cases of AIDS have been reported in the United States since 1981, and as many as 900,000 Americans may be infected with HIV. (Source: excerpt from HIV Infection and AIDS, An Overview, NIAID Fact Sheet: NIAID) ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that 850,000 to 950,000 U.S. residents are living with HIV infection, one-quarter of whom are unaware of their infection. (Source: excerpt from HIV-AIDS Statistics, NIAID Fact Sheet: NIAID)

Worldwide prevalence of HIV/AIDS:

40 million worldwide with HIV/AIDS 2003 (Report on the Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic, UNAIDS, 2002); 36.1 million cases worldwide (CBCF Health Organisation, 2004)

Worldwide prevalence of HIV/AIDS:

As of the end of 2001, an estimated 40 million people worldwide 37.2 million adults and 2.7 million children younger than 15 years were living with HIV/AIDS. More than 70 percent of these people (28.1 million) live in Sub-Saharan Africa; another 15 percent (6.1 million) live in South and Southeast Asia. (Source: excerpt from HIV-AIDS Statistics, NIAID Fact Sheet: NIAID)

Prevelance of HIV/AIDS discussion:

Backgrounder -- HIV Infection in Infants and Children: NIAID (Excerpt)

According to UNAIDS (The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS) and the World Health Organization (WHO),2,3 at the end of 1998, an estimated 1.2 million children worldwide under age 15 were living with HIV/AIDS. Approximately 3.2 million children under 15 had died from the virus or associated causes. The number of children who had lived with HIV from the start of the epidemic through 1997 was estimated to be 3.8 million. As HIV infection rates rise in the general population, new infections are increasingly concentrating in younger age groups.

Statistics for the year 1998 alone show that

  • 590,000 children under age 15 were newly infected with HIV.

  • One-tenth of all new HIV infections were in children under age 15.

  • Approximately 7,000 young people aged 10 to 24 became infected with HIV every day-that is, five each minute.

  • Nine out of 10 new infections in children under 15 were in sub-Saharan Africa.

  • An estimated 510,000 children under 15 died of AIDS-related causes, up from 460,000 in 1997.
More than 95 percent of all HIV-infected people now live in developing countries, which have also suffered 95 percent of all deaths from AIDS. In countries with the longest-lived AIDS epidemics, some doctors report that children ill from HIV occupy three-quarters of pediatric hospital beds, and childrens' life expectancy has been shortened dramatically. In Botswana, for example, because of AIDS, the life expectancy of children born early in the next decade is just over age 40; without AIDS, it would have been 70. In Namibia, the infant mortality rate is expected to reach 72 deaths per 1000, up from a non-AIDS rate of 45 per 1000.

The United States has a relatively small percentage of the world's children living with HIV/AIDS. From the beginning of the epidemic through the end of 1998, 5,237 American children under age 13 had been reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as living with HIV/AIDS.4 Three hundred eighty-two cases of pediatric AIDS were reported in 1998.5 There are many more children who are infected with HIV but have not yet developed AIDS. Half of all new HIV infections reported to the CDC have been in people younger than 25.6 One encouraging fact is that the number of pediatric AIDS cases estimated by the CDC fell by two-thirds from 1992 to 1997 (947 to 310 cases).7

The U.S. cities that had the five highest rates of pediatric AIDS during 1998 were New York City; Miami, Florida; Newark, New Jersey; Washington, D.C.; and San Juan, Puerto Rico.8 The disease disproportionately affects children in minority groups, especially African Americans.9 Out of 8,461 cases in children under 13 reported to the CDC through December 1998, 58 percent were in blacks/not-Hispanic, 23 percent were in Hispanics, 17.5 percent were in whites/not-Hispanic, and 5.33 percent were in other minority groups.10

According to 1996 data, the latest available, HIV infection was the seventh leading cause of death for U.S. children through 14 years of age.11 However, the CDC reported a drop of 56 percent from 1994 to 1997 in the estimated number of children who died from AIDS.12 New anti-HIV drug therapies and promotion of voluntary testing are having a major impact. (Source: excerpt from Backgrounder -- HIV Infection in Infants and Children: NIAID)

HIV Infection in Adolescents, NIAID Fact Sheet: NIAID (Excerpt)

Through December 2000, 4,061 cases of AIDS in people ages 13 through 19 had been reported to the U.S. Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC). Many other adolescents are currently infected with HIV but have not yet developed AIDS. Data from the 36 states that conduct HIV case surveillance indicate that among adolescents ages 13 through 19,

  • 58 percent were male
  • 42 percent were female
  • 28 percent were White, not Hispanic
  • 50 percent were Black, not Hispanic
  • 20 percent were Hispanic
  • Asian/Pacific Islander or American Indian/Alaskan Native, less than 1 percent
Because the average period of time from HIV infection to the development of AIDS is 10 years, most young adults with AIDS were likely infected with HIV as adolescents. Almost 18 percent of all reported cases of AIDS in the United States have occurred in people between the ages of 20 and 29. HIV infection is the ninth leading cause of death in adults ages 25-44. (Source: excerpt from HIV Infection in Adolescents, NIAID Fact Sheet: NIAID)

Incidence of HIV/AIDS:

Approximately 40,000 new HIV infections occur each year in the United States, about 70 percent among men and 30 percent among women. Of these newly infected people, half are younger than 25 years of age. (Source: excerpt from HIV-AIDS Statistics, NIAID Fact Sheet: NIAID)

Prevelance statistics for HIV/AIDS:

The following statistics relate to the prevalence of HIV/AIDS:

  • 700,000 US cases reported to the CDC since 1981
  • Estimated 40 million people worldwide (2001)
  • 25.3 million cases in Africa (CBCF Health Organisation, 2004)
  • 36.1 million cases worldwide (CBCF Health Organisation, 2004)
  • AIDS prevalence statistics in the USA:
    • 384,906 people with AIDS in the US 2002 (CDC)
    • 46% of cases occurred in white people in the US 2002 (CDC)
  • more statistics...»

Incidence statistics for HIV/AIDS:

The following statistics relate to the incidence of HIV/AIDS:

  • 42,136 new cases of AIDS in the US 2002 (HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, 2002)
  • 42,745 new cases of AIDS/HIV occurred annually in the US 2002 (Health, United States, 2003, NCHS, CDC)
  • 4 million new cases in Africa (CBCF Health Organisation, 2004)
  • 45,104 annual cases of HIV notified in USA 1999 (MMWR 1999)
  • Estimated 5 million worldwide new cases for HIV/AIDS 2003 (Report on the Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic, UNAIDS, 2002)
  • more statistics...»

Death statistics for HIV/AIDS:

The following statistics relate to deaths and HIV/AIDS:

  • 14,175 deaths in USA 2001 (American Heart Association, 2004)
  • 16,371 deaths from AIDS in the US 2002 (HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, 2002)
  • AIDS ranked number one cause of death for black adults aged 25-44 in the USA (CBCF Health Organisation, 2004)
  • 21.8 million deaths since start of epidemic to 2001 worldwide (Report on the Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic, UNAIDS, 2002)
  • 1 in 3 gay African American men in urban areas USA 2001 (CBCF Health Organisation, 2004)
  • more statistics...»

More Statistics about HIV/AIDS:

  • Deaths and related statistics
  • Hospitalization statistics
  • Cost statistics
  • All statistics for HIV/AIDS

    About prevalence and incidence statistics:

    The term 'prevalence' of HIV/AIDS usually refers to the estimated population of people who are managing HIV/AIDS at any given time. The term 'incidence' of HIV/AIDS refers to the annual diagnosis rate, or the number of new cases of HIV/AIDS diagnosed each year. Hence, these two statistics types can differ: a short-lived disease like flu can have high annual incidence but low prevalence, but a life-long disease like diabetes has a low annual incidence but high prevalence. For more information see about prevalence and incidence statistics.

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