Assessment
Questionnaire

Have a symptom?
See what questions
a doctor would ask.
 
Diseases » Hookworm » Contagiousness
 

Is Hookworm Contagious?

Transmission of Hookworm from Person to Person

Hookworm is considered infectious but is not transmitted from person to person. Generally, a disease like this is caused by an infectious agent and not spread between people.
Hookworm, although infectious, is not a genetic disease. It is not caused by a defective or abnormal gene.

Transmission of Hookworm

Transmission of Hookworm to a person can be by way of:

  • contaminated soil.

Contagion summary:

Spread by human feces in areas of poor sanitation.

Contagiousness properties for Hookworm:


  Contagious overall?: Yes

  Contagious from water?: Yes, if contamined by feces.

  Contagious from food?: Yes, if contamined by feces.

  Contagious from feces?: Yes

Contagion summary:

People usually get this infection by walking barefoot over contaminated soil. (Source: excerpt from Parasitic Roundworm Diseases, NIAID Fact Sheet: NIAID)

Discussion about Contagion of Hookworm:

Hookworm Infection: DPD (Excerpt)

Hookworms have a complex life cycle that begins and ends in the small intestine. Hookworm eggs require warm, moist, shaded soil to hatch into larvae. These barely visible larvae penetrate the skin (often through bare feet), are carried to the lungs, go through the respiratory tract to the mouth, are swallowed, and eventually reach the small intestine. This journey takes about a week. In the small intestine, the larvae develop into half-inch-long worms, attach themselves to the intestinal wall, and suck blood. The adult worms produce thousands of eggs. These eggs are passed in the feces (stool). If the eggs contaminate soil and conditions are right, they will hatch, molt, and develop into infective larvae again after 5 to 10 days. (Source: excerpt from Hookworm Infection: DPD)

Parasitic Roundworm Diseases, NIAID Fact Sheet: NIAID (Excerpt)

People usually get this infection by walking barefoot over contaminated soil. In penetrating the skin, the larvae may cause an allergic reaction. It is from the itchy patch at the place where the larvae entered that the early infection gets its nickname "ground itch." Once larvae have broken through the skin, they enter the bloodstream and are carried to the lungs. (Unlike ascarids, however, hookworms do not usually cause pneumonia.) The larvae migrate from the lungs up the windpipe to be swallowed and carried back down to the intestine. (Source: excerpt from Parasitic Roundworm Diseases, NIAID Fact Sheet: NIAID)

About contagion and contagiousness:

Contagion and contagiousness refers to how easily the spread of Hookworm is possible from one person to another. Other words for contagion include "infection", "infectiousness", "transmission" or "transmissability". Contagiousness has nothing to do with genetics or inheriting diseases from parents. For an overview of contagion, see Introduction to Contagion.

 

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use. Information provided on this site is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information on this site is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs. Please see our Terms of Use.

Home | Symptoms | Diseases | Diagnosis | Videos | Tools | Forum | About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Site Map | Advertise