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Diseases » Huntington's Disease » Inheritance
 

Inheritance and Genetics of Huntington's Disease

Inheritance of Huntington's Disease:

Autosomal dominant diseases are usually inherited from the one parent who already has the disease. Rare cases of sporadic genetic disease with neither parent having the disease can also occur. See inheritance of autosomal dominant diseases.

Huntington's Disease: Inheritance and Genetics Details

Inheritance properties of Huntington's Disease:

  Disease inherited from: Usually inherited from one parent who has Huntington's Disease; see inheritance of autosomal dominant diseases.

  Gender bias in inheritance: Male and female children are equally at risk of autosomal dominant diseases.

Inheritance Patterns

Inheritance odds for Huntington's Disease:

  Overall odds of inheritance: Usually inherited from one parent who has Huntington's Disease; see inheritance of autosomal dominant diseases.

  Sibling of diseased child odds of inheriting disease: Usually 50% for autosomal dominant diseases.

  Overall odds of inheriting from mother: Usually 50% for autosomal dominant diseases.

  Overall odds of inheriting from father: Usually 50% for autosomal dominant diseases.

  Mother to son inheritance odds: Usually 50% for autosomal dominant diseases.

  Father to son inheritance odds: Usually 50% for autosomal dominant diseases.

  Mother to daughter inheritance odds: Usually 50% for autosomal dominant diseases.

  Father to daughter inheritance odds: Usually 50% for autosomal dominant diseases.

  Inheritance from one diseased parent odds: Usually 50% for autosomal dominant diseases.

  Inheritance from two diseased parents odds: Usually 75% (50% disease, 25% double dominant) for autosomal dominant diseases.

Genetic Carriers

Genetic carriers of Huntington's Disease:

  Carriers possible for disease?: No, not for autosomal dominant diseases.

  Odds daughter becomes genetic carrier: 0%. There are no carriers for autosomal dominant diseases.

  Odds son becomes genetic carrier: 0%. There are no carriers for autosomal dominant diseases.

Inheritance Features

Inheritance features for Huntington's Disease:

  Inheritance pattern: Vertical inheritance for autosomal dominant disease.

  Sporadic form of disease possible?: Yes, only one genetic mutation is required for a sporadic version of an autosomal dominant disease.

  Double dominant form of disease possible?: Yes, double dominance is definitely applicable for autosomal dominance.

  Inheritance from one double dominant parent: Usually 100% inheritance from a double dominant form of an autosomal dominant disease.

Huntington's Disease: Genetics Information

Genetics of Huntington's Disease: The HD gene, whose mutation results in Huntington disease, was mapped to chromosome 4 in 1983 and cloned in 1993. The mutation is a characteristic expansion of a nucleotide triplet repeat in the DNA that codes for the protein huntingtin. As the number of repeated triplets - CAG (cytosine, adenine, guanine) - increases, the age of onset in the patient decreases. Furthermore, because the unstable trinucleotide repeat can lengthen when passed from parent to child, the age of onset can decrease from one generation to the next. Since people who have those repeats always suffer from Huntington disease, it suggests that the mutation causes a gain-of-function, in which the mRNA or protein takes on a new property or is expressed inappropriately. (Source: Genes and Disease by the National Center for Biotechnology)

About inheritance and genetics:

Inheritance of Huntington's Disease refers to whether the condition is inherited from your parents or "runs" in families. The level of inheritance of a condition depends on how important genetics are to the disease. Strongly genetic diseases are usually inherited, partially genetic diseases are sometimes inherited, and non-genetic diseases are not inherited. For general information, see Introduction to Genetics.

 

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