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Treatments for Hypertension

Treatments for Hypertension:

The most effective treatment plan for hypertension uses a multifaceted approach. Treatment plans are also individualized to best address the specific cause and the patient's age, medical history, and severity of hypertension. Hypertension is highly treatable and in most people, prompt and ongoing treatment will result in a normalization of blood pressure and in minimizing the risk of serious complications.

Treatment begins with prevention. This includes maintaining a healthy weight, not drinking alcohol excessively, not smoking, eating a healthy-healthy diet, and getting regular exercise. These preventive measures are also generally recommended as treatment measures as well.

Not all people can effectively manage their blood pressure by these lifestyle measures alone. For these people oral medications, known as anti-hypertensive drugs, may be prescribed. Individual medications may be used alone or in combination with other medications.

Anti-hypertensive medications include diuretics, also known as "water pills", which lower blood pressure by stimulating the kidneys to flush extra fluid and salt from the body. ACE inhibitors lower blood pressure by preventing the body from making a hormone called angiotensin II, which narrows and tightens blood vessels. Angiotensin II receptor blockers protect blood vessels from the narrowing effects of angiotensin. Beta blockers help the heart to beat slower and less forcefully. Calcium channel blockers block calcium from entering the cells of the heart and blood vessels, resulting in relaxation of the vessels. Alpha blockers decrease nerve impulses that tighten blood vessels. Vasodilators relax and widen the blood vessels walls. Nervous system inhibitors work in the brain to increase messages to the blood vessels to relax and widen them.

Treatment of hypertension also includes addressing underlying causes such as thyroid disease, obesity, and kidney disease. If hypertension is caused by a certain medication, then a dosage adjustment or different medication may be needed.

Complications of hypertension are also treated as appropriate.

Hypertension treatment: High blood pressure is highly treatable. Perhaps the biggest obstacle to successful treatment of high blood pressure is not recognizing that this "silent" condition exists. This is why it is important to get regular medical check-ups so that blood pressure can be measured, monitored for trends, and evaluated within a context of a full family and personal medical history and physical exam. The overall treatment goal for people with high blood pressure is to control and maintain blood pressure at a normal level, which minimizes the risk of developing serious complications and diseases, such as kidney disease, stroke, coronary heart disease, and heart failure. As a very general guide, this means keeping blood pressure below 140/90 mmHg for adults. Current guidelines consider consistent readings over 120/80mmHg as "pre-hypertensive", which should be monitored and addressed to ensure they readings do not rise over time. Your health care provider will work with you to develop an individualized treatment plan that best fits your condition and your life style. The most effective treatment plans offer a multifaceted approach that can include medications and life style changes.

Addressing lifestyle habits that may result in high blood pressure includes eating a heart healthy diet that is high in vegetable, fruits, and whole grains, and low in sodium. This also means limiting alcohol intake to two drinks per day for men and one drink per day for women. Getting enough exercise is also important. This includes at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity on most or all days of the week, as recommended by your health care provider. These lifestyle interventions can also help to achieve and maintain a healthy weight, another important factor in preventing and treating high blood pressure. Because smoking raises blood pressure, quitting smoking is key to achieving a healthy blood pressure. Your health care provider can prescribe treatments to help you quit smoking and refer you to smoking cessation programs. Reducing stress is another key step to take to minimize high blood pressure.

Not all people can effectively manage their blood pressure by lifestyle changes alone. For these cases, there are a wide variety of oral medications, also known as anti-hypertensive drugs, which are safe and effective in treating high blood pressure in conjunction with continuing lifestyle changes. Individual medication may be used alone or in combination with other medications. Diuretics, also known as "water pills", lower blood pressure by stimulating the kidneys to flush extra fluid and salt from the body. ACE inhibitors lower blood pressure by preventing the body from making a hormone called angiotensin II, which narrows and tightens blood vessels. Angiotensin II receptor blockers protect blood vessels from the narrowing effects of angiotensin. Beta blockers help the heart to beat slower and less forcefully. Calcium channel blockers block calcium from entering the cells of the heart and blood vessels, resulting in relaxation of the vessels. Alpha blockers decrease nerve impulses that tighten blood vessels. Vasodilators relax and widen the blood vessels walls. Nervous system inhibitors work in the brain to increase messages to the blood vessels to relax and widen them.

Sticking to a treatment regimen for high blood pressure can be a challenge because people with high blood pressure often feel fine without treatment until major damage has been done. It is very important to stick to your treatment regimen and not change or discontinue your medications without consulting with your health care provider. Ensure that all your health care providers, including the dentist, are aware that you have high blood pressure and that you are taking antihypertensive medications.

Treatment List for Hypertension

The list of treatments mentioned in various sources for Hypertension includes the following list. Always seek professional medical advice about any treatment or change in treatment plans.

Alternative Treatments for Hypertension

Alternative treatments or home remedies that have been listed as possibly helpful for Hypertension may include:

Hypertension: Is the Diagnosis Correct?

The first step in getting correct treatment is to get a correct diagnosis. Differential diagnosis list for Hypertension may include:

Hidden causes of Hypertension may be incorrectly diagnosed:

Hypertension: Marketplace Products, Discounts & Offers

Products, offers and promotion categories available for Hypertension:

Curable Types of Hypertension

Possibly curable types of Hypertension may include:

  • Eclampsia of pregnancy
  • Hyperthyroidism induced hypertension
  • Cushing's disease induced hypertension
  • more curable types...»

Hypertension: Research Doctors & Specialists

Research all specialists including ratings, affiliations, and sanctions.

Drugs and Medications used to treat Hypertension:

Note:You must always seek professional medical advice about any prescription drug, OTC drug, medication, treatment or change in treatment plans.

Some of the different medications used in the treatment of Hypertension include:

  • Acebutolol
  • Apo-Acebutolol
  • Gen-Acebutolol
  • Med-Acebutolol
  • Monitan
  • Rhotral
  • Sectral
  • Amiloride
  • Apo-Amilzide
  • Midamor
  • Moduret
  • Moduretic
  • Novamilor
  • Nu-Amilzide
  • Riva-Amilzide
  • Amlodipine
  • Lotrel
  • Norvasc
  • Angiotensin Converting Enzyme
  • ACE Inhibitor
  • Benazepril
  • Lotensin
  • Lotensin HCT
  • Captopril
  • Apo-Capto
  • Capoten
  • Capozide
  • Novo-Captopril
  • Nu-Capto
  • Syn-Captopril
  • Enalapril
  • Lexxel
  • Vaseretic
  • Vasotec
  • Fosinopril
  • Lin-Fosinopril
  • Monopril
  • Monopril HCT
  • Lisinopril
  • Prinivil
  • Prinzide
  • Zestoretic
  • Zestril
  • Quinapril
  • Accupril
  • Accuretic
  • Ramipril
  • Altace
  • Ramace
  • Angiotensin II Receptor Antagonists
  • Candesartan
  • Atacand
  • Atacand HCT
  • Eprosartan
  • Teveten
  • Irbesartan
  • Avapro
  • Avalide
  • Losartan
  • Cozaar
  • Hyzaar
  • Telmisartan
  • Micardis
  • Valsartan
  • Diovan
  • Diovan HCT
  • Atenolol
  • Apo-Atenolol
  • Novo-Atenolol
  • Nu-Atenolol
  • PMS-Atenolol
  • Tenoretic
  • Tenormin
  • Betaxolol
  • Betoptic
  • Betoptic-Pilo
  • Betoptic-S
  • Kerlone
  • Novo-Betaxolol
  • Carteolol
  • Cartrol
  • Ocupress
  • Occupress
  • Carvedilol
  • Coreg
  • Dilatrend
  • Eucardic
  • Proreg
  • Clonidine
  • Apo-Clonidine
  • Catapres
  • Catapres-TTS
  • Combipres
  • Dixarit
  • Duraclon
  • Novo-Clonidine
  • Nu-Clonidine
  • Diltiazem
  • Albert Diltiazem CD
  • Apo-Diltiaz
  • Alti-Diltiazem
  • Cardizem
  • Cardizem CD
  • Cardizem SR
  • Cartia XT
  • Dilacor XR
  • Diltia XT
  • Diltiazem ER
  • Med-Diltiazem SR
  • Novo-Diltiazem
  • Nu-Diltiaz
  • Pharma-Diltiaz
  • Syn-Diltiazem
  • Teczem
  • Tiamate
  • Tiazac
  • Doxazosin
  • Apo-Doxazosin
  • Cardura
  • Cardura-1
  • Doxaloc
  • Gen-Doxazosin
  • Med-Doxazosin
  • Felodipine
  • Plendil
  • Altace plus Felodipine
  • Logimax
  • Renedil
  • Furosemide
  • Albert Furosemide
  • Apo-Furosemide
  • Fumide MD
  • Furocot
  • Furomide MD
  • Furose
  • Furosemide-10
  • Furoside
  • Lasaject
  • Lasimide
  • Lasix
  • Lasix Special
  • Lo-Aqua
  • Luramide
  • Myrosemide
  • Novo-Semide
  • Ro-Semide
  • SK-Furosemide
  • Uritol
  • Tenex
  • Hydralazine
  • Alazine
  • Alphapres
  • Apo-Hydralazine
  • Apresazide
  • Apresoline
  • Apresoline-Esidrix
  • Cam-Ap-Es
  • Dralserp
  • DralzineH-H-R
  • Hydroserpine
  • Hyserp
  • Lo-Ten
  • Marpres
  • Novo-Hylazin
  • Nu-Hydral
  • Ser-A-Gen
  • Ser-Ap-Es
  • Serpasil-Apresoline
  • Serprex
  • Supres
  • Tri-Hydroserpine
  • Unipres
  • Uniserp
  • Apo-Indapamide
  • Dom-Indapamide
  • Gen-Indapamide
  • Lozide
  • Lozol
  • PMS-Indapamide
  • Isradipine
  • DynaCirc
  • DynaCirc CR
  • Labetalol
  • Normodyne
  • Normozide
  • Trandate
  • Trandate HCT
  • Metoprolol
  • Apo-Metoprolol
  • Betaloc
  • Co-Betaloc
  • Lopressor
  • Lopressor Delayed-Release
  • Lopressor HCT
  • Lopressor OROS
  • Novo-Metoprol
  • Nu-Metop
  • Toprol
  • Toprol XL
  • Mibefradil
  • Minoxidil
  • Alostil
  • Apo-Gain
  • Kresse
  • Loniten
  • Med-Minoxidil
  • Minocalve 5
  • Minodyl
  • Minoximen
  • Nadolol
  • Alti-Nadol
  • Apo-Nadol
  • Corgard
  • Corzide
  • Syn-Nadol
  • Nicardipine
  • Cardene
  • Cardene SR
  • Nifedipine
  • Adalat
  • Adalat CC
  • Adalat FT
  • Adalat P.A
  • Apo-Nifed
  • Gen-Nifedipine
  • Novo-Nifedin
  • Nu-Nifed
  • Procardia
  • Procardia XL
  • Scheinpharm Nifedipine XL
  • Nisoldipine
  • Sular
  • Penbutolol
  • Levatol
  • Pindolol
  • Apo-Pindol
  • Dom-Pindolol
  • Novo-Pindol
  • Nu-Pindol
  • Syn-Pindolol
  • Viskazide
  • Visken
  • Prazosin
  • Apo-Prazo
  • Minipres
  • Minizide
  • Novo-Prazin
  • Nu-Prazo
  • Propranolol
  • Apo-Propranolol
  • Betachron
  • Detensol
  • Inderal
  • Inderal-LA
  • Inderide
  • Inderide LA
  • Ipran
  • Novo-Pranol
  • PMS Propranolol
  • Spironolactone
  • Alatone
  • Aldactazide
  • Aldactone
  • Apo-Spirozide
  • Novo-Spiroton
  • Novo-Spirozine
  • Sincomen
  • Spironazide
  • Terazosin
  • Apo-Terazosin
  • Hytrin
  • Novo-Terazosin
  • Thiazide Diuretics
  • Bendroflumethiazide
  • Naturetin
  • Chlorothiazide
  • Aldochlor
  • Diachlor
  • Diupres
  • Diurigen
  • Diuril
  • SK-Chlorothiazide
  • Chlorothalidone
  • Apo-Chlorthalidone
  • Demi-Regroton
  • Hygroton
  • Hygroton-Resperpine
  • Hylidone
  • Novothalidone
  • Regroton
  • Thalitone
  • Uridon
  • Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Aldoril D30/D50
  • Aldoril-15/25
  • Apo-Hydro
  • Apo-Methazide
  • Apo-Triazide
  • Diaqua
  • Diuchlor H
  • Dyazide
  • Esidrex
  • Ezide
  • H-H-R
  • HydroDiuril
  • Hydromal
  • Hydro-Par
  • Hydropres
  • Hydroserpine Plus
  • Hydro-T
  • Hydro-Z-50
  • Ismelin-Esidrex
  • Maxzide
  • Maxzide-25
  • M Dopazide
  • Microzide
  • Mictrin
  • Natrimax
  • Neo-Codema
  • Novo-Doparil
  • Novo-Hydrazide
  • Novo-Trimzide
  • Oretic
  • Oreticyl
  • PMS Dopazide
  • Serpasil-Esidrex
  • SK-Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Thiuretic
  • Timolide
  • Uniretic
  • Urozide
  • Ziac
  • Zide
  • Hydroflumethiazide
  • Diucardin
  • Saluron
  • Methyclothiazide
  • Aquatensen
  • Duretic
  • Enduron
  • Metolazone
  • Diulo
  • Microx
  • Mykrox
  • Zaroxolyn
  • Trichlormethiazide
  • Duirese
  • Marazide II
  • Metahydrin
  • Naqua
  • Naquival
  • Timolol
  • Apo-Timolol
  • Apo-Timop
  • Betimol
  • Blocadren
  • Cosopt
  • Dom-Timolol
  • Novo-Timolol
  • Triamterene
  • Dyrenium
  • Novo-Triamzide
  • Nu-Triazide
  • Riva-Zide
  • Verapamil
  • Alti-Verapamil
  • Apo-Verap
  • Calan
  • Calan SR
  • Chronovera
  • Covera-HS
  • Dom-Verapamil SR
  • Gen-Verapamil
  • Isoptin
  • Isoptin SR
  • Med-Verapamil
  • Nu-Verap
  • PMS-Verapamil
  • Tarka
  • Verelan
  • Verelan PM
  • Nov-Acebutolol
  • Nu-Acebutolol
  • Amiloride and Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Norvas
  • Caduet - mainly used to treat patients with hypertension and angina
  • Amlodipine and Atorvastatin - mainly used to treat patients with hypertension and angina
  • Amlodipine and Benazepril
  • Gen-Atenolol
  • Rhoxal-atenolol
  • Tenolin
  • Blokium
  • Bisoprolol
  • Zebeta
  • Monocor
  • Bisoprolol and Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Bumedyl
  • Drenural
  • Miccil
  • Alti-Captopril
  • Gen-Captopril
  • PMS-Captopril
  • Captral
  • Cardipril
  • Cryopril
  • Ecaten
  • Kenolan
  • Lenpryl
  • Romir
  • Chlorthalidone
  • Cilazapril
  • Inhibace
  • Clonidine and Chlorthalidone
  • Clorpres
  • Diazoxide
  • Hyperstat I.V
  • Angiotrofin
  • Novo-Diltiazem-CD
  • Novo-Diltiazem SR
  • Nu-Diltiaz-CD
  • Ratio-Diltiazem CD
  • Rhoxal-Diltiazem CD
  • Rhoxal-Diltiazem SR
  • Gen-Diltiazem
  • Gen-Diltiazem SR
  • Apo-Diltiaz SR
  • Apo-Diltiaz CD
  • Alti-Diltiazem SR
  • Taztia XT
  • Feliberal
  • Glioten
  • Kenopril
  • Norpril
  • Palane
  • Pulsol
  • Renitec
  • Eplerenone
  • Inspra
  • Eprosartan and Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Teveten HCT
  • Esmolol
  • Brevibloc
  • Fenoldopam
  • Corlopam
  • Guanfacine
  • Guanabenz
  • Wytensin
  • Hydra-Zide
  • Hydralazine and Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Mecamylamine
  • Inversine
  • Mthyclothiazide and Deserpidine
  • Enduronyl
  • Enduronyl Forte
  • Moexipril
  • Univasc
  • Moexipril and Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Syscor
  • Olmesartan
  • Benicar
  • Benicar HCT
  • Olmesartan and Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Oxprenolol
  • Slow-Trasicor
  • Trasicor
  • Perindopril Erbumine
  • Coversyl
  • Phentolamine
  • Regitine
  • Rogitine
  • Z-Max
  • Polythiazide
  • Renesse
  • Propranolol and Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Micardis HCT
  • Micardis Plus
  • Telmisartan and Hydrochlorthiazide
  • Trandolapril and Verapamil
  • Metatensin
  • Trichlorex
  • Captohexal
  • Acenorm
  • Enzace
  • Liprace
  • Uremide
  • GenRx Frusemide
  • Frusid
  • Frusehexal
  • Alphapress
  • Lercanidipine
  • Zanidip
  • Phenoxybenzamine
  • Dibenyline
  • Garlic

Unlabeled Drugs and Medications to treat Hypertension:

Unlabelled alternative drug treatments for Hypertension include:

  • Bumetanide
  • Bumex
  • Burinex
  • Carteolol
  • Cartrol
  • Ocupress
  • Occupress
  • Clonidine - mainly used as second line treatment in congestive heart failure patients
  • Apo-Clonidine - mainly used as second line treatment in congestive heart failure patients
  • Catapres - mainly used as second line treatment in congestive heart failure patients
  • Catapres-TTS - mainly used as second line treatment in congestive heart failure patients
  • Combipres - mainly used as second line treatment in congestive heart failure patients
  • Dixarit - mainly used as second line treatment in congestive heart failure patients
  • Duraclon - mainly used as second line treatment in congestive heart failure patients
  • Novo-Clonidine - mainly used as second line treatment in congestive heart failure patients
  • Nu-Clonidine - mainly used as second line treatment in congestive heart failure patients
  • Alti-Captopril - mainly used to treat hypertension secondary to scleroderma renal crisis and Takayasu's disease
  • Gen-Captopril - mainly used to treat hypertension secondary to scleroderma renal crisis and Takayasu's disease
  • PMS-Captopril - mainly used to treat hypertension secondary to scleroderma renal crisis and Takayasu's disease
  • Captral - mainly used to treat hypertension secondary to scleroderma renal crisis and Takayasu's disease
  • Cardipril - mainly used to treat hypertension secondary to scleroderma renal crisis and Takayasu's disease
  • Cryopril - mainly used to treat hypertension secondary to scleroderma renal crisis and Takayasu's disease
  • Ecaten - mainly used to treat hypertension secondary to scleroderma renal crisis and Takayasu's disease
  • Kenolan - mainly used to treat hypertension secondary to scleroderma renal crisis and Takayasu's disease
  • Lenpryl - mainly used to treat hypertension secondary to scleroderma renal crisis and Takayasu's disease
  • Romir - mainly used to treat hypertension secondary to scleroderma renal crisis and Takayasu's disease

Latest treatments for Hypertension:

The following are some of the latest treatments for Hypertension:

Hospital statistics for Hypertension:

These medical statistics relate to hospitals, hospitalization and Hypertension:

  • 0.17% (22,006) of hospital episodes were for hypertensive disease in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 79% of hospital consultations for hypertensive disease required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 52% of hospital episodes for hypertensive disease were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 48% of hospital episodes for hypertensive disease were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • more hospital information...»

Hospitals & Medical Clinics: Hypertension

Research quality ratings and patient incidents/safety measures for hospitals and medical facilities in specialties related to Hypertension:

Hospital & Clinic quality ratings »

Choosing the Best Treatment Hospital: More general information, not necessarily in relation to Hypertension, on hospital and medical facility performance and surgical care quality:

Medical news summaries about treatments for Hypertension:

The following medical news items are relevant to treatment of Hypertension:

Discussion of treatments for Hypertension:

High Blood Pressure and Kidney Disease: NIDDK (Excerpt)

Many people need medicine to control high blood pressure. A group of medications called ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibitors lower blood pressure and have an added protective effect on the kidney in people with diabetes. Additional studies have shown that ACE inhibitors also reduce proteinuria and slow the progression of kidney damage in people who do not have diabetes. You may need to take a combination of two or more blood pressure medicines to reach 125/75. (Source: excerpt from High Blood Pressure and Kidney Disease: NIDDK)

Heart Disease & Women Preventing & Controlling High Blood Pressure: NHLBI (Excerpt)

Limit Your Alcohol Use. If you drink alcohol, have no more than one drink per day. That means no more than 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1 1/2 ounces of hard liquor. (Source: excerpt from Heart Disease & Women Preventing & Controlling High Blood Pressure: NHLBI)

Heart Disease & Women Preventing & Controlling High Blood Pressure: NHLBI (Excerpt)

Use Less Salt. Try seasoning foods instead with herbs, spices, and lemon juice. Keep in mind that sodium, an ingredient in salt, is "hidden" in many packaged and processed foods. Check product labels for the amount of sodium in each serving. Many experts advise a total daily salt intake of no more than 6 grams, which equals about 2,400 milligrams of sodium--this includes whatever is added during cooking and at the table. If you would like to try a salt substitute, talk with your doctor first, because they are not safe for everyone. (Source: excerpt from Heart Disease & Women Preventing & Controlling High Blood Pressure: NHLBI)

Heart Disease & Women Preventing & Controlling High Blood Pressure: NHLBI (Excerpt)

Be Physically Active. Even low- to modeate-intensity activity, if done regularly, can help control and prevent high blood pressure. Examples of such exercise are walking for pleasure, gardening, yardwork, moderate-to-heavy housework, dancing, and home exercise. Try to do one or more of these activities every day. (Source: excerpt from Heart Disease & Women Preventing & Controlling High Blood Pressure: NHLBI)

Heart Disease & Women Preventing & Controlling High Blood Pressure: NHLBI (Excerpt)

Lose Weight If You Are Overweight. Taking off excess pounds will help to control and prevent high blood pressure, and will lower your chances of developing cardiovascular disease in several other ways. Weight loss will help to prevent and control diabetes, and it can also lower blood cholesterol levels. Finally, since being overweight raises the chances of developing heart disease, losing weight can lower your risk. (Source: excerpt from Heart Disease & Women Preventing & Controlling High Blood Pressure: NHLBI)

High Blood Pressure -- Age Page -- Health Information: NIA (Excerpt)

If you have mild HBP, your doctor may suggest that you lose weight and keep it off, eat less salt, cut down on alcohol, and get more exercise. You may bring your blood pressure down simply by following this advice. Even if medicine is needed, these daily habits may help it work better. (Source: excerpt from High Blood Pressure -- Age Page -- Health Information: NIA)

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