Assessment
Questionnaire

Have a symptom?
See what questions
a doctor would ask.
 
Diseases » Hyperthermia » Glossary
 

Glossary for Hyperthermia

  • Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis: A rare neurological disorder where an inflammation of the brain and spinal cord occurs due to damage to the protective covering (myelin sheath) around the nerves.
  • Amphetamine poisoning: Excessive ingestion of amphetamine drugs.
  • Antipsychotic poisoning: Excessive ingestion of antipsychotic drugs.
  • Arizona Bark Scorpion poisoning: A bite from the Arizona Bark scorpion contains chemicals toxic to the nerve system and can cause serious, life-threatening symptoms.
  • Autonomic nerve disorders: A disorder of the nervous system concerned with regulation of activity of cardiac muscle, smooth muscle, and glands, usually restricted to the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems
  • Autonomic neuropathy: A disorder of the nervous system concerned with regulation of activity of cardiac muscle, smooth muscle, and glands, usually restricted to the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems
  • Babesiosis: A parastic infection by a particular protozoa (Babesia) which is transmitted through tick bites. The disease produces symptoms similar to malaria.
  • Bar's syndrome: A rare type of bacterial infection that tends to occur in pregnant women. It manifests as pain in the gallbladder, ureter or appendix area as well as fever and bacteria in the urine.
  • Bartonellosis: An infectious disease caused by Bartonella bacilliforms and transmitted by sandflies. It causes fever, anemia and a skin rash.
  • Bornholm disease: Contagious viral infection
  • Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia: Inflammation of lung tissue (bronchioles and surrounding tissue) which may occur on its own or as a result of other conditions such as certain infections.
  • Burkitt's lymphoma: Lymphoma associated with Epstein Barr virus.
  • Calcitriol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Calcitriol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Campylobacter jejuni: Rod shaped bacteria causing diarrhea.
  • Cathinone poisoning: Cathinone comes from the leaves of the Khat plant which is native to eastern Africa. Cathinone is a stimulant as well as have pain killing, weight loss and neuromuscular effects. The psychoactive effects are usually utilized by chewing on the leaves of the plant but sometimes dried leaves are used.
  • Cellulitis: Inflammation of skin or subcutaneous tissues.
  • Chagas disease: A parasitic infection caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by insect bites or blood transfusions. The disease primarily involves the heart and gastrointestinal system.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetylsalicylic Acid: Acetylsalicylic Acid is also known as aspirin and is primarily used to relieve pain, fever and inflammation. Excessive exposure to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Boric Acid: Boric Acid is a chemical used mainly in foods (preservative, emulsifier, neutralizer), antiseptics, pesticides and contact lens cleaners. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Application of boric acid directly to damaged skin can cause the chemical to be absorbed rapidly into the body and lead to death. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dinitrocresol: Dinitrocresol is a chemical used mainly as a herbicide and fungicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dinitrophenol: Dinitrophenol is a chemical that has various applications: herbicide, pesticide, fungicide, acaricide, manufacture of dyes and wood preservative. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hexachlorobenzene: Hexachlorobenzene is a chemical used mainly in seed treatments. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lysergic Acid Diethylamide: Lysergic Acid Diethylamide is a hallucinogenic drug which is often misused. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metaldehyde: Metaldehyde is a chemical used mainly as a molluscicide, in heating fuel and in fire lighters. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methyl Bromide: Methyl Bromide is a chemical used mainly in insecticides, fire extinguishers, wool degreasers and oil extraction. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Strychnine: Strychnine is used as a rodenticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Toxaphene: Toxaphene is a chemical used mainly as a livestock insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Cholecystitis: Inflammation of the gallbladder which concentrates and stores bile. The condition may occur suddenly (acute) or persist over a longer period of time (chronic).
  • Cobra poisoning: The Cobra is a poisonous snake which can be found in Africa, Asia and other parts of the world. Some cobras are able to spit venom into the victims eye and cause serious symptoms.
  • Cocaine overdose: Cocaine is an illegal and highly addictive recreational drug. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Cocaine poisoning: Excessive ingestion of cocaine.
  • Colorado tick fever: A tickborne condition caused by an arenavirus
  • Crisponi syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by excessive muscle contractions in response to stimulus, claw hand, distinctive facial features and fever. Most patients die within months of birth due to complications of hyperthermia but some cases are slowly progressive with longer survival possible.
  • Crush injury: An injury caused by a crushing mechanism
  • Cyclic antidepressant poisoning: Excessive ingestion of cyclic antidepressant drugs.
  • Dehydration: Loss of fluids in the body
  • Ecstasy abuse: Use of the illicit drug called ecstasy
  • Erysipelas: A severe streptococcal bacterial infection where infection spreads from the skin to tissue underneath. The face and extremities are the usual sites affected.
  • Fever: Elevation of the body temperature above the normal 37 degrees celsius
  • Funnel Web spider poisoning: The funnel web spider is a poisonous spider found mainly in Australia and America. The venom is toxic to the nervous system. There are two phases of poisoning - the first phase starts soon after envenomation and may result in death in severe cases. The second phase occurs one or two hours after envenomation where patients may recover somewhat but symptoms such as apnea and low blood pressure may develop.
  • GTP cyclohydrolase deficiency: A rare metabolic disorder caused by an enzyme deficiency (GTP cyclohydrolase) which causes a harmful build up of phenylalanine in the blood.
  • Hand-Foot-Mouth Syndrome: An infectious viral disease caused by the coxsackievirus A. The disease is characterized by the development of blisters in the mouth and on hands and feet. The disease is spread by contact with body fluids from an infected person and the incubation period is 3 - 7 days. The infection is most common in children under the age of ten but can occur in teenagers and sometimes in adults.
  • Heat cramps: Muscle cramps related to exertion
  • Heatstroke: Heat exhaustion and collapse from heat exposure
  • Hemiplegic migraine, familial: A rare inherited form of migraine that characteristically causes temporary paralysis on one side of the body.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Autumn Crocus: Autumn crocus can be used as a herbal agent to treat gout and rheumatoid conditions. The herbal agent contains chemicals such as colchicine and the ingestion of excessive amounts of this can result in symptoms. Severe overdose can result in death and chronic ingestion can also cause harmful effects.
  • Hydroa vacciniforme: A rare skin disorder characterized the development of crusting skin eruptions following exposure to the sun.
  • Kawasaki disease: A childhood illness that generally affects the skin, mouth and lymph nodes.
  • Lassa fever: Infectious rat-borne West African disease.
  • Lymphangitis: Inflammation of the lymphatic channels caused by an infectious agent.
  • MAO inhibitor poisoning: Excessive ingestion of MAO inhibitor drugs.
  • Malakoplakia: A rare chronic inflammatory condition of the genitourinary system that tends to mostly affect people with weakened immune systems. Soft yellow lesions or nodules form on the gastrointestinal lining. It is believed to be the result of the bodies failed attempt to completely destroy invading organisms such as fungus and bacteria.
  • Malignant hyperthermia: A very rare genetic disorder where sufferers suffer episodes of adverse reactions when certain anesthetics or muscle relaxants are administered.
  • Mastocytosis: A disorder where excessive amounts of mast cells proliferate in organs such as the skin, liver, bone, spleen and gastrointestinal tract. Mast cells occur in connective tissue and defend the body against disease by releasing histamine to stimulate the immune system.
  • Measles: Once common viral infection now rare due to vaccination.
  • Mediastinitis: Inflammation of the area between the lungs called the mediastinum which contains the heart, thymus gland, windpipe, esophagus and large blood vessels. The condition may occur suddenly (acute) or slowly over a period of time (chronic). It is often a complication of open chest surgery or penetrating chest wounds.
  • Mustard tree poisoning: The mustard tree is found in various parts of America and contains nicotine. Ingestion of the plant can cause various symptoms. The leaves of the plant is sometimes smoked for its effects but it can result in death.
  • Nanukayami:
  • Neonatal sepsis: Bacterial blood infection in an infant under 3 months of age.
  • Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome: A severe, potentially fatal reaction to antipsychotic drugs.
  • Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency: A rare metabolic disorder where a deficiency of the enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase means that nitrogen isn't removed from the body and builds up in the blood in the form of ammonia.
  • Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) Deficiency: A rare metabolic disorder where a deficiency of the enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase means that nitrogen isn't removed from the body and builds up in the blood in the form of ammonia.
  • Other conditions resulting from external causes: Medical conditions caused by some external event, such as in the environment.
  • Phencyclidine poisoning: Excessive ingestion of phencyclidine drugs.
  • Plant poisoning -- Saponin: Saponin is a toxin found naturally in plants such as the Christmas rose and carnations. It gives plants a bitter taste which makes poisoning relatively uncommon.
  • Pseudodiastrophic dysplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short stature, contractures and joint dislocations.
  • Rabies: An infectious disease that can affect any mammal including humans and is transmitted through the saliva of an infected animal. The infectious agent is the Neurotropic lyssavirus which affects the salivary gland and also causes neurological symptoms.
  • Renal infarction: The death of an area of tissue in the kidney due to a localized lack of oxygen. Usually results from an interruption in the blood supply. The severity of the symptoms depends on how large the affected part of the kidney is. Small infarcts can produce virtually no symptoms. The condition is relatively uncommon and frequently misdiagnosed.
  • Salicylate poisoning: Excessive ingestion of salicylate drugs.
  • Secondary syphilis: A condition which is characterized by fever, multiform skin eruptions, iritis, alopecia, mucous patches and severe pain in the head and joints
  • Selected Encephalitides: Selected conditions which cause inflammation of the brain
  • Sennetsu Fever: A rare infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Ehrlichia sennetsu.
  • Septic shock: serious medical condition caused by decreased tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery as a result of infection and sepsis, though the microbe may be systemic or localized to a particular site
  • Serotonin Syndrome: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Serotoninergic syndrome: A disorder involves high levels of serotonin which can result from use of medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.
  • Smallpox: Dangerous virus now almost eliminated worldwide by vaccination.
  • Stuve-Wiedemann dysplasia: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by short stature, bowed long bones and permanent flexion of fingers.
  • Stuve-Wiedemann syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by short stature, bowed long bones and permanent flexion of fingers.
  • Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis: A progressive neurological disorder involving inflammation of the brain caused by a complication of the measles virus. It can occur up to 10 years after the initial measles virus and may be due to a defective immune response to the virus or a reactivation of the virus.
  • Subacute sclerosing leukoencephalitis: A rare chronic form of brain inflammation that is associated with the measles virus. The patient usually appears to have a full recovery after the measles infection with symptoms developing usually between two and eight years after the infection. The condition tends to affect children and young adults mainly. The disease process involves the degeneration of the protective nerve sheaths (myelin) in the brain. Measles immunization is the most effective way of preventing the development of this complication of measles.
  • Toxic Shock Syndrome: Severe immune reaction causing shock
  • Toxic mushrooms -- Anticholinergic: Some mushrooms contain a toxic chemical called ibotenic acid which causes anticholinergic symptoms. Ibotenic acid is converted to muscimol during digestion. The two toxins have opposing actions which results in initial excitation symptoms followed by a prolonged coma-like sleep. Mushroom species from this group include certain species of Amanita sp. - cothurnata, crenulata, frostiana, gemmata, muscaria and pantherina. Eating two to four mushrooms can result in impaired senses and eating more than twenty usually results in death.
  • Yellow fever: A viral infection transmitted by mosquito bites which can damage various organs such as the liver, heart, kidney and digestive tract.
  • Zanier-Roubicek syndrome: An inherited syndrome characterized by reduced sweating, hyperthermia, sparse hair, missing teeth and brittle nails.

 

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use. Information provided on this site is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information on this site is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs. Please see our Terms of Use.

Home | Symptoms | Diseases | Diagnosis | Videos | Tools | Forum | About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Site Map | Advertise