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Diseases » Insomnia » Glossary
 

Glossary for Insomnia

  • ACTH -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on mice indicate that the use of ACTH during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • Abuse dwarfism syndrome: Retarded growth, intelligence and social behavior due to child abuse. The child abuse can take the form of mental or physical cruelty or neglect.
  • Accidental injury: An injury that occurs accidentally
  • Acebutolol Hydrochloride -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on rats indicate that using Acebutolol Hydrochloride during pregnancy produces no harmful effects on the developing fetus. Acebutolol Hydrochloride is a beta blocker medication used to treat high blood pressure and abnormal heart rhythm. Other reports indicate that use in pregnant women also produces no harmful effects on the fetus.
  • Acitretin- Teratogenic Agent: Reports indicate that the use of Acitretin during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. Acitretin should not be taken by women who are pregnant or planning on becoming pregnant.
  • Acrodynia: Symptoms caused by chronic mercury poisoning in infants in children.
  • Acute intermittent porphyria: A rare metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency in the porphobilinogen deaminase enzyme which results in a build-up of porphyrins or its precursors in the body. Using certain drugs or eating certain foods can trigger the symptoms of the condition.
  • Acute mountain sickness: A condition that occurs when an un-acclimatized person climbs to high altitudes.
  • Alcohol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Alcohol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Alcohol Withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when alcohol consumption is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive use of alcohol ranging from binge drinking to severe alcoholism
  • Alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing syndrome: The excessive consumption of alcohol can result in symptoms similar to a condition called Cushing's syndrome. When alcohol consumption is stopped, symptoms regress.
  • Alcoholism: Alcoholism is the compulsive urge to drink alcohol despite knowing the negative impact on one's health.
  • Aldehyde syndrome: A metabolic anomaly where consumption of alcohol results in high levels of blood acetaldehyde which causes a variety of symptoms.
  • Allergic tension-fatigue syndrome: Variable symptoms caused by food allergy.
  • Alprazolam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Alprazolam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Alprenolol -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on rats indicate that the use of Alprenolol during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • Alzheimer's Disease: Dementia-causing brain disease mostly in seniors and the elderly.
  • Amantadine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amantadine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Ambien withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Ambien (Zolpidem) use is discontinued or reduced. Ambien is a sedative hypnotic drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Amiodarone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amiodarone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amobarbital -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amobarbital during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amphetamine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amphetamine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amphetamine abuse: Use of the stimulant drugs known as amphetamines or "speed"
  • Andropause: A symptomatic decline in male androgens that may occur as men age.
  • Anemia, Iron-Deficiency: A lack of fully functioning red blood cells due to a deficiency of iron. The iron allows the body to make hemoglobin in red blood cells which in turn allows the red blood cell to carry oxygen.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. There are two types: type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1 and a third of cases in type 2.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 1: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 2: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a third of cases in type 2.
  • Anger: A strong feeling of displeasure and aggrevation
  • Angina: A special type of chest pain.
  • Anxiety: A feeling of apprehension, and fear without apparent stimulus that is associated sometime with somatic responses
  • Anxiety disorders: Anxiety disorders are persistent and excessive feelings of fear, worry or uneasiness that are significant enough to have an impact on day-to-day life. Excessive anxiety can have repercussions on physical and mental health. There are a number of different subtypes of anxiety disorders such as General anxiety, Social anxiety, Phobias, Hypochondria and Obsessive compulsive disorder.
  • Aplastic anemia: A blood disorder where the bone marrow produces insufficient new blood cells.
  • Arthritis: General name for any type of joint inflammation, but often means age-related osteoarthritis.
  • Arthritis pain: Arthritis is inflammation of one or more joints, which results in pain, swelling, stiffness, and limited movement.
  • Asbestosis: Lung condition from asbestos exposure
  • Ascariasis: Large intestinal roundworm from 6 to 13 inches.
  • Aspirin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Aspirin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Asthma: Repeated attacks of breathing difficulty.
  • Ativan withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Ativan (Lorazepam) use is discontinued or reduced. Ativan is an anti-anxiety drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Autoimmune thyroid diseases: Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland.
  • Barbiturate abuse: Abuse of barbiturate medications
  • Benazepril Hydrochloride -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on rats indicate that the use of Benazepril Hydrochloride during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • Benzodiazepine abuse: Abuse of benzodiazepine tranquiliser medications
  • Bipolar disorder: Cycles of mania and depression; commonly called "manic-depression".
  • Bladder symptoms: Symptoms related to the bladder and urination.
  • Brain Concussion: Trauma resulting in minor injury to the brain which causes a period of interrupted brain function. Simple concussions resolve themselves in about a week whereas more serious ones have persisting symptoms. The onset of symptoms may be delayed.
  • Breathing-related sleep disorder: Breathing-related sleep disorder refers to a spectrum of breathing anomalies ranging from chronic or habitual snoring to upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS) to frank obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) or, in some cases, obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS).
  • Buerger's disease: Buergers's disease is a recurring inflammation and thrombosis (clotting) of small and medium arteries and veins of the hands and feet
  • Burnout syndrome: Severe stress caused by work-related physical or mental trauma.
  • COPD: Severe obstruction of bronchial air flow typically from bronchitis and/or emphysema.
  • Caffeine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to caffeine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Caffeine addiction: Caffeine addiction is the uncontrollable craving for caffeine products such as coffee. Other caffeinated products include diet pills, chocolate, pain killers, cold remedies and soft drinks. Cessation causes withdrawal symptoms which can vary in nature and severity.
  • Calcium deficiency: Dietary deficiency of calcium.
  • Cathinone poisoning: Cathinone comes from the leaves of the Khat plant which is native to eastern Africa. Cathinone is a stimulant as well as have pain killing, weight loss and neuromuscular effects. The psychoactive effects are usually utilized by chewing on the leaves of the plant but sometimes dried leaves are used.
  • Chemical addiction: Addiction to and abuse of various substances.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Antimony: Antimony is a chemical often used as an alloy with other metals such as lead. It is used in solder, ammunition, pewter, sheet metal, pipe metal and cable sheaths. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylbenzene: Ethylbenzene is a chemical used mainly in paint thinners, fuels, asphalt, degreasers, manufacture of various as products and as a solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Gasoline: Gasoline is a chemical used as a fuel for combustion engines. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Jet Fuel-5: Jet Fuel-5 is an aviation turbine fuel used by the US military. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Manganese: Manganese is a chemical used mainly in fertilizers, welding rods, matches, electrical coils, ceramics and animal food additives. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Monocrotophos: Monocrotophos is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- RDX: RDX is a chemical used mainly in explosives, fireworks, detonators and rodenticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetryl: Tetryl is a chemical used mainly as a military explosive. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Toluene: Toluene is a chemical used mainly in pesticides, degreasers, glues and pain removers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chlorpheniramine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Chlorpheniramine (an antihistamine medication) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Severe chronic fatigue disorder often following infection.
  • Chronic Illness: Any form of continuing chronic illness.
  • Chronic depression: Chronic depression is a mental disorder characterized by an all-encompassing low mood accompanied by low self-esteem, and loss of interest or pleasure in normally enjoyable activities and this maybe present for months together.
  • Chronic pain: Ongoing pain of any type
  • Chronic vitamin A toxicity: Chronic excessive ingestion of vitamin A can cause symptoms.
  • Circadian rhythm disorder: Circadian rhythm disorder are a family of sleep disorders affecting, among other things, the timing of sleep.
  • Circadian rhythm sleep disorder: A group of sleep disorders involving abnormalities in the timing of the sleep-wake cycle. Examples include jet lag and shift work sleep disorder. Sufferers are unable to wake and sleep in the normal routines required to function in normal work, school and social settings. The sleep quality is usually normal.
  • Cirrhosis of liver: Chronic liver disease wherein normal liver parenchyma is replaced by fibrous tissue.
  • Clonazepam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Clonazepam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Clonidine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Clonidine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cluster headache: Headache that occurs periodically, with active periods interrupted by spontaneous remissions.
  • Cocaine abuse: Stimulant drug with various effects
  • Cocaine addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use cocaine on a regular basis. Chronic cocaine use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Cocaine withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when cocaine use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Codeine withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Codeine use is discontinued or reduced. Codeine is a sedative pain-killer. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Colic: Abdominal spasms causing pain
  • Combat stress reaction: A term used in the military which refers to behaviors that result from the stress of fighting in a war.
  • Congenital hepatic porphyria: A rare congenital disorder where there is an excess of porphyrin (pigments) in the body. The liver is responsible for making porpyrins.
  • Corticotropin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Corticotropin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Crack addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use crack on a regular basis. Chronic crack use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Crack is a form of cocaine - powdered cocaine is heated with ammonia or sodium bicarbonate to make rocks of crack. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Crack withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when cocaine hydrochloride use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A very rare degenerative brain disease that can be inherited, transmitted (eg in surgical transplants using infected tissue) or as a result of genetic mutations. The condition is fatal.
  • Crystal meth addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use crystal meth on a regular basis. Crystal meth is a powerful stimulant used illegally for its effects. It is highly addictive and known by street names such as ice, speed, glass, crank and chalk. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Cushing's syndrome: A rare syndrome where excessive secretion of corticosteroids by the adrenal cortex leads to a variety of symptoms. Hormone-secreting adrenal or pituitary tumors are often the cause of the excessive corticosteroid secretion.
  • Cystitis: Bladder infection or inflammation
  • Daytime tiredness: The experience of tiredness felt by a person in the daytime
  • Dementia: Various mental impairment conditions.
  • Demerol withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Demerol use is discontinued or reduced. Demerol is a pain-killing drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Depression: Various syndromes with excessive anxiety, phobias, or fear.
  • Depressive disorders: Depression or its various related conditions.
  • Dexedrine withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Dexedrine use is discontinued or reduced. Dexedrine is an amphetamine. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Symptoms are usually peak during the second day and last about a week.
  • Diaphragmatic paralysis: Diaphragmatic paralysis occurs when the muscles associated with breathing become do weak to function properly. Breathing becomes difficulty and severe cases can result in death if breathing assistance is not delivered. The condition can result from such things as motor neuron disease, trauma and myopathy.
  • Diazepam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Diazepam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Difficulty falling asleep: Sleeping difficulty, called insomnia, can involve difficulty falling asleep when you first go to bed at night, waking up too early in the morning, and waking up often during the night.
  • Dilantin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that the use of Dilantin (anti-seizure medication) during pregnancy may cause a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Dilaudid withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Dilaudid use is discontinued or reduced. Dilaudid is a pain-killing drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Symptoms are usually peak during the second day and last about a week.
  • Discontinuation syndrome: Symptoms that can occur when a person suddenly stops taking their high blood pressure medication.
  • Double Depression: Double depression occurs when someone with dysthymia experiences an episode of major depression.
  • Drowsiness: Excessive tiredness or sleepiness
  • Drug abuse: Addiction to any of various illicit drugs.
  • Drug-related insomnia: Drug related insomnia is sleeplessness that is attributable to the excessive usage of medications.
  • Duodenal ulcer: A peptic ulcer is erosion in the lining of the stomach or duodenum (the first part of the small intestine). The word "peptic" refers to pepsin, a stomach enzyme that breaks down proteins. If a peptic ulcer is located in the stomach it is called a gastric ulcer.
  • Dysomnia: Dysomnia is a general term for sleep disorder. It is a primary sleep disorder in which the patient suffers from changes in the quantity, quality, or timing of sleep.
  • Dyssomnia: A general term used to describe any sleeping condition where a person has trouble either getting to sleep or staying asleep. The condition often occurs for short periods of time but if it continues for longer periods of time it can cause problems resulting from insufficient sleep.
  • Dysthymia: Mild form of depression
  • Earache: Pain in the ear called "otalgia"
  • East African Trypanosomiasis: East African sleeping sickness from the tsetse fly
  • Ecstasy abuse: Use of the illicit drug called ecstasy
  • Ecstasy withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when ecstasy use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Eczema: Eczema is a chronic skin condition characterized by skin inflammation and irritation. The severity of extent of the condition is highly variable. It may be caused by allergies, irritants or other factors such as stress.
  • Emotional stress: A condition which occurs when a person is under stress affecting their emotions
  • Endogenous depression: Endogenous depression is a mood disorder that affects some people from birth and is believed to be a genetic condition. A sufferer is prone to become depressed on the advent of traumatic events, exhaustion or when under high levels of stress and may not be aware of the disorder until confronted by symptoms of depression for the first time.
  • Endogenous insomnia: Insomnia that is often caused by a discomfort within the body ranging from indigestion to pain.
  • Excessive hunger: Inappropriate hunger or overeating.
  • Excitement: The sensation of increased anxiety and anticipation
  • Falls: When a person losses balance and falls over
  • Fatal familial insomnia: A very rare inherited brain disease that severely affects sleep and causes progressive deterioration of mental and movement functions.
  • Fibromyalgia: A difficult to diagnose condition affecting the muscles and/or joints
  • Flunitrazepam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Flunitrazepam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Folic acid toxicity: Excessive consumption of folic acid can cause symptoms of toxicity.
  • Food Allergy -- Quorn: A quorn allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to quorn or food containing quorn. Quorn is a type of protein made from a fungus. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- aniseed: An aniseed allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to aniseed or food containing aniseed. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- banana: A banana allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to bananas or food containing bananas. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- bean: A bean allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to beans or food containing beans. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- beef: A beef allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to beef. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- buckwheat: A buckwheat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to buckwheat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- cabbage: A cabbage allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to cabbage or food containing cabbage. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- chick pea: A chick pea allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to chick peas or food containing chick peas. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- chicken meat: A chicken meat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to chicken meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- coconut: A coconut allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to coconuts or food containing coconut. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- duck meat: A duck meat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to duck meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- fennel: A fennel allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to fennel or food containing fennel. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- garlic: A garlic allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to garlic or food containing garlic. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- goose meat: A goose meat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to goose meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- lamb: A lamb allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to lamb meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- lettuce: A lettuce allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to lettuce or food containing lettuce. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- meat: A meat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- pea: A pea allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to peas or food containing peas. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- pine nut: A pine nut allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pine nuts or food containing pine nuts. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- pork: A pork allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- pumpkin: A pumpkin allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pumpkin or food containing pumpkin. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- red meat: A red meat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to red meat. This type of allergy is rare and severe reactions are even rarer. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.
  • Food Allergy -- tuna: A tuna allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to tuna or food containing tuna. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- vegetable oil: A vegetable oil allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to vegetable oil or food containing vegetable oil. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food Allergy -- zucchini: A zucchini allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to zucchini or food containing zucchini. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms.
  • Food allergies: Immune over-reaction to an eaten food.
  • Generalized anxiety disorder: Excessive anxiety and worrying.
  • Ginseng overuse: Excessive use of ginseng can cause symptoms.
  • Glenard syndrome: The downward displacement of internal organs.
  • Glucose transport defect, blood-brain barrier: A rare metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of a molecule needed to transport glucose (GLUT1). The glucose is unable to be transported from the blood and into the brain and cerebrospinal fluid. Sugar transport to the brain is essential for normal development. The blood sugar level remains normal. Fasting exacerbates symptoms which can very in severity depending on the degree of deficiency.
  • Graves Disease: is an autoimmune disease characterized by hyperthyroidism due to circulating autoantibodies. Thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins (TSIs) bind to and activate thyrotropin receptors, causing the thyroid gland to grow and the thyroid follicles to increase synthesis of thyroid hormone.
  • Grief or loss: The normal emotional response that occurs to an external loss
  • Guarana overuse: The consumption of high doses of guarana can cause symptoms.
  • Heart conditions: Any condition that affects the heart
  • Heart failure: Slow failure of the heart (cardiac insufficiency).
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Ginseng: Ginseng can be used as a herbal agent, usually in the form of a tea, to help combat stress. Excessive doses of ginseng can cause overdose symptoms - 3 to 15 g per day for a number of years can cause overdose symptoms.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Sabah vegetable: Sabah vegetable can be used as a herbal agent to treat obesity and prevent vision problems. The herbal agent contains a chemical (papvarine alkaloids) which can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Heroin dependence: The physical and psychological dependence to the recreational drug heroin
  • Huntington's Disease: Inherited disease causing progressive mental deterioration.
  • Hydrocodone withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Hydrocodone use is discontinued or reduced. Hydrocodone is pain-killing drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Symptoms are usually peak during the second day and last about a week.
  • Hyperphagia: A term used to describe excessive eating. It is often caused by damage to the part of the brain called the hypothalmos.
  • Hypersomnia: Hypersomnia is characterized by recurring episodes of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) or prolonged nighttime sleep.
  • Hyperthyroidism: Too much thyroid hormone production.
  • Inborn amino acid metabolism disorder: A group of inherited disorders where the body is not able to metabolize amino acids consumed in the diet. Amino acids are a part of carbohydrates, fats and proteins and are metabolized in order to provide energy or to make other needed compounds. There are many steps involved in metabolism and the severity can be greatly variable depending on the exact nature of the disorder.
  • Indigestion: Various eating symptoms of indigestion (dyspepsia)
  • Insomnia: Insomnia is defined as repeated difficulty with the initiation, duration, maintenance, or quality of sleep that occurs despite adequate time and opportunity for sleep that results in some form of daytime impairment.
  • Insomnia with sleep apnea: The association of insomnia with sleep apnea. Patients may be unaware that their bouts of sleep apnea is actually causing them to wake during the night and they may mistakenly believe that they simply have insomnia.
  • Jet lag: Jet lag is a physiological condition which is a consequence of alterations to circadian rhythms; it is classified as one of the circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Jet lag results from rapid long-distance transmeridian (east-west or west-east) travel, as on a jet plane.
  • Kidney disease: Reduced kidney function from various causes.
  • Kidney failure: Total failure of the kidneys to filter waste
  • Klonopin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Klonopin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • LSD addiction: LSD addiction is the uncontrollable craving for LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide) which is a hallucinogenic drug which is derived from a type of fungus. Although the drug is not technically classified as addictive as it doesn't cause drug-seeking behaviours but increasing tolerance to the drug means that increasing doses of the drug are required to achieve the desired effects. It causes a psychological addiction rather than a physical addiction.
  • Lamotrigine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lamotrigine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Leg cramps: Leg pain that is caused by continuous muscle contractions
  • Lorazepam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lorazepam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lung conditions: Various conditions affecting the lungs or related airways.
  • Lysergic Acid Diethylamide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lysergic Acid Diethylamide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Mania: Inappropriate euphoric mood
  • Marie-Se Syndrome: A sudden buildup of fluid inside the skull (hydrocephalus) in infants who are given large doses of vitamin A. Symptoms tend to occur about 12 hours after the receiving the vitamin A and usually last for a day or two.
  • Menopause: The end of female menstruation and fertility.
  • Menstruation: The passage of blood and uterine tissue through the vagina cyclically
  • Mental illness: Any psychological syndrome
  • Mercury poisoning -- Folk Remedies: Various folk remedies and medicines contain inorganic mercury and mercury salts. They can lead to mercury poisoning and severe cases can result in death. Children tend to be more sensitive to the effects of mercury poisoning than adults. Even low levels of exposure can cause neurological symptoms in infants and young children. Fetal exposure to mercury can also result in symptoms.
  • Mercury poisoning -- consumption of contaminated fish: Eating fish contaminated with mercury can lead to mercury poisoning in humans. The severity and range of symptoms experienced can vary greatly depending on the level and duration of exposure. Severe poisoning can lead to death. Pregnant women who eat mercury contaminated fish may give birth to infants who suffer symptoms such as ataxia, tremors, seizures, mental retardation and cerebral palsy. An epidemic was reported where hundreds of Japanese villagers suffered mercury poisoning after eating fish contaminated by a nearby factory. Nearly half of the victims eventually died and children born during that period suffered a variety of neurological problems.
  • Methamphetamine withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when methamphetamine use is discontinued or reduced. Methamphetamines are often called speed, meth, crystal or crank. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Methylphenidate -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Methylphenidate during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Middle ear infection: Infection of middle ear also called otitis media.
  • Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Mild brain injury caused by trauma, accident or injury
  • Mood disorders: Disorders that affect a persons mood
  • Morphine withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Morphine use is discontinued or reduced. Morphine is a pain-killing drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Symptoms are usually the most severe between 36 and 72 hours after withdrawal and symptoms tend to abate within a week. Craving may persist for months.
  • Mountain sickness: Illness from poor adjustment to low oxygen at altitude.
  • Mycosis fungoides: Mycosis fungoides is a rare form of T-cell lymphoma of the skin. The disease is typically slowly progressive and chronic.
  • Mycosis fungoides, familial: A rare form of lymphatic cancer (T-cell lymphoma) that primarily affects the skin and tends to occur with higher than normal frequency within a family. The skin is affected first, then the lymph nodes become inflamed and usually cancerous. The cancer can then spread to organs such as the liver, lungs and bone marrow. Survival depends on how early treatment starts. Patients diagnosed in the early stages can survive more than 12 years whereas once the cancer has spread to other organs, death usually occurs within three years.
  • Narcolepsy: Narcolepsy is characterized by the classic tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis.
  • Narcotic addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use narcotics on a regular basis. The drug may be used as a therapeutic medication for various conditions but it's use is also frequently abused. Examples of narcotic drugs include heroin, morphine, Demerol and codeine. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Night eating syndrome: A disorder where a person persistently eats during the night. Sometimes patients are unware that they have eaten during the night and their may be more than one late-night eating binge each night. The behavior must usually continue for at least two months before it can be diagnosed as night eating syndrome. Triggering factors for this order include anxiety, depression, stress, boredom and body image problems.
  • Nocturia: Urination during the night
  • Nocturnal asthma: Nocturnal asthma is a type of asthma that tends to only produce symptoms at night. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult. The severity of symptoms is variable. Factors such as airconditioning, gastroesophageal reflux and sleeping in a reclining positing may increase the incidence of this form of asthma in susceptible patients.
  • Obstructive sleep apnea: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome is characterized by episodic upper airway obstruction that occurs during sleep.
  • Occupational Injuries: Any injury that occurs during the act of working for monetary remuneration
  • Olivopontocerebellar Atrophy: A group of diseases progressive degeneration occurs in a particular area of the brain (olivopontocerebellar area) which results in various neurological symptoms.
  • Opioid addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use opioids on a regular basis. Opioids may may be prescribed by a physician for the purpose of pain relief but patients may become physically dependent on the drug and continue to obsessively use it even after the condition it was prescribed for has resolved. In other cases, opioid addiction results from the illicit use of the drug for recreational purposes. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling. Examples of opioids includes morphine, heroin, oxycodone and fentanyl.
  • Opioid withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when opioid use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Opioids includes heroin, methadone and codeine.
  • Opium addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use opium on a regular basis. Opium may may be prescribed by a physician for the purpose of pain relief but patients may become physically dependent on the drug and continue to obsessively use it even after the condition it was prescribed for has resolved. In other cases, opium addiction results from the illicit use of the drug for recreational purposes. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Opium withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Opium use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • OxyContin withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when OxyContin use is discontinued or reduced. OxyContin is a pain reliever but is also used as a recreation drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Oxycontin addiction: Oxycontin is a commonly prescribed pain killer which is recognized as carrying a high risk of addiction. Initial use of the drug may be to control chronic pain but patients may find themselves increasingly dependent on the drug and unable to stop its use. Other cases of addiction may occur when people deliberately and illegally misuse Oxycontin as a recreational drug.
  • Pain: A feeling of suffering, agony, distress caused by the stimulation of pain fibres in the nervous system
  • Pain killer addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use pain-relieving medication on a regular basis. Pain killers are often prescribed for the treatment of sleeping problems but chronic use can lead to dependence on the drug. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Panic attack: Sudden attack of unreasonable panic or fear without any real danger
  • Parasomnia: Parasomnia are a category of sleep disorders that involve abnormal and unnatural movements, behaviors, emotions, perceptions, and dreams that occur while falling asleep, sleeping, between sleep stages, or arousal from sleep.
  • Parkinson's Disease: Degenerative brain condition characterised by tremor.
  • Peganone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Peganone (an anticonvulsant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Percocet withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Percocet use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Periodic limb movements in sleep: Repeated involuntary leg movements during sleep.
  • Phenol sulfotransferase deficiency: A rare inherited disorder where the body is deficient in an enzyme (phenol sulfotransferase) which makes them unable to process phenols and other toxic substance in the body. A buildup of phenol in the body can cause physical and behavioral problems.
  • Phenylephrine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Phenylephrine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Pick's Disease: Degenerative dementia condition.
  • Pickwickian syndrome: A syndrome characterized by obesity, somnolence, hypoventilation and erythrocytosis
  • Pierre Robin's sequence: A rare genetic disorder characterized by an underdeveloped jaw, cleft soft palate and abnormal tongue location.
  • Pineal Teratoma: A type of brain tumor that occurs mainly in the pineal region of the brain.
  • Pinealoma: A slow-growing type of brain tumor that occurs in the pineal gland. The pineal gland produces a hormone called melatonin which is involved in regulating sleep patterns.
  • Pituitary tumors, adult: A benign or cancer tumor that develops in the tissue of the pituitary gland in adults. The pituitary gland produces various hormones and some pituitary tumors (functioning tumors) can affect the secretion of one or more of these hormones resulting in a range of symptoms depending on the exact location of the tumor. Some pituitary tumors do not affect hormone production (nonfunctioning tumors).
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Lead: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Lead has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Oxazepam: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Oxazepam (a pharmaceutical drug) has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Phenytoin: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Phenytoin (an anticonvulsant medication) has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Postconcussive syndrome: Symptoms that can occur following a head injury.
  • Prednisolone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Prednisolone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Pregnancy: The condition of supporting a fetus from conception till birth.
  • Premenstrual dysphoric disorder: Premenstrual dysphoric disorder is a diagnosis used to indicate serious premenstrual distress with associated deterioration in functioning.
  • Premenstrual syndrome: Condition with cyclic symptoms related to menstruation.
  • Prescribed medication addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use prescribed medication in a manner or frequency not prescribed. Drugs such as painkillers are prescribed to treat such things as pain but patients may become physically dependent on the drug and continue to obsessively use it even after the condition it was prescribed for has resolved. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Primary insomnia: Primary insomnia is sleeplessness that is not attributable to a medical, psychiatric, or environmental cause.
  • Prion diseases: Various diseases caused by abnormal proteins (prions) in the brain.
  • Probable human carcinogen -- Anabolic steroids: Anabolic steroids are a substance deemed to be a probable carcinogen to humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Problem Sleepiness: Problem daytime drowsiness.
  • Prostate conditions: Any condition affecting the prostate in men.
  • Prostatitis: Prostatitis is an inflammation of the prostate gland, in men.
  • Pseudoephedrine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Pseudoephedrine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Psychiatric disorders: Any condition that affects ones mind
  • Psycho-reactive insomnia: Insomnia is a common complaint in which the sufferer has poor sleep that is often broken many times during the course of the night and psychoreactive trait is the stimulus.
  • Pyridoxine deficiency: Deficiency of vitamin B6 which has many uses in the body.
  • Ramipril -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ramipril during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Rape trauma syndrome: A condition that occurs following sexual assault.
  • Renon-Delille syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by reduced function of the thyroid and ovaries and enlarged hands and feet.
  • Resistance to thyroid stimulating hormone: A very rare disorder where the body is unable to respond to thyroid stimulating hormone even though it is present in sufficient quantities. The problem lies in defective thyroid stimulating hormone receptors.
  • Respiratory muscle paralysis: Respiratory paralysis occurs when the muscles associated with breathing become do weak to function properly. Breathing becomes difficulty and severe cases can result in death if breathing assistance is not delivered. The condition can result from such things as motor neuron disease, trauma and myopathy.
  • Respiratory paralysis: Respiratory paralysis occurs when the muscles associated with breathing become do weak to function properly. Breathing becomes difficulty and severe cases can result in death if breathing assistance is not delivered. The condition can result from such things as motor neuron disease, trauma and myopathy.
  • Restless Legs Syndrome: A neurological disorder where legs develop and crawling, aching skin sensation which is relived by moving the legs.
  • Restless leg syndrome: Restless leg syndrome is a condition that is characterized by an irresistible urge to move one's body to stop uncomfortable or odd sensations. It most commonly affects the legs, but can also affect the arms or torso.
  • Rett's syndrome: Autism-like behavioral syndrome in infant girls
  • Ritalin withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Ritalin use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Schizophrenia: A psychiatric disorder characterized by hallucinations and delusional beliefs where a person is unable to distinguish between reality and imagination. The condition tends to have a chronic nature and can be severely debilitating if treatment isn't sought.
  • Secondary insomnia: Secondary insomnia differs from primary insomnia in that a specific condition can be identified as the cause of the sleep problem and should be evaluated by a physician.
  • Secondary restless leg syndrome: Secondary restless leg syndrome is a condition that is characterized by an irresistible urge to move one's body to stop uncomfortable or odd sensations. It most commonly affects the legs, but can also affect the arms or torso.
  • Sedative dependence: The psychological or physical dependence on sedative medication
  • Senior health conditions: Medical conditions affecting seniors, male or female.
  • Shift work sleep disorder: Shift work sleep disorder is a circadian rhythm sleep disorder which affects people who change their work or sleep schedules frequently or work longterm on other than the day shift.
  • Shortness of breath: The feeling of being short of breath
  • Silo unloader syndrome: An occupational lung disease that occurs in farm workers who go into a silo and breath in the nitrogen dioxide which are toxic to the body. Death can occur in some cases. Symptoms usually occur within a week of entering the silo.
  • Sinusitis: Sinusitis is an inflammation of the paranasal sinuses.
  • Sleep Apnea Syndromes: Syndromes involving the cessation of breathing during sleep. Examples include obstructive sleep apnea and central sleep apnea. The condition may range from mild to severe.
  • Sleep Disorders, Extrinsic: An extrinsic sleep disorder is a circadian rhythm sleep disorder that is caused by factors outside the body such as jetlag and shift work as opposed to processes within the body. Delayed sleep phase syndrome and non-24-hour sleep-wake syndrome are examples of extrinsic sleep disorders.
  • Sleep Disorders, Intrinsic: An intrinsic sleep disorder is a circadian rhythm sleep disorder that is caused by processes within the body as opposed to extrinsic which is caused by factors outside the body such as jetlag and shift work.
  • Sleep apnea: Childhood obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome is characterized by episodic upper airway obstruction that occurs during sleep.
  • Sleep deprivation: The condition of not getting enough sleep.
  • Sleep disorders: Any disorder that affects ones sleep
  • Sleep disturbance: Sleeping difficulty, called insomnia, can involve difficulty falling asleep when you first go to bed at night, waking up too early in the morning, and waking up often during the night.
  • Sleep paralysis: The occurrence of paralysis during ones sleep
  • Sleep symptoms: Symptoms affecting sleep patterns.
  • Sleeping pill addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use sleeping pills on a regular basis. Sleeping pills are often prescribed for the treatment of sleeping problems but chronic use can lead to dependence on the drug. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Sleeplessness: The feeling of tiredness and the need to sleep
  • Smoking: The smoking of cigarettes
  • Sopite syndrome: A condition primarily involving the drowsiness associated with motion sickness.
  • Steroid withdrawal syndrome: Symptoms that can occur when a patient stops taking corticoid medication.
  • Stress: Emotional stress (sometimes refers to physical stress)
  • Substance Withdrawal Syndrome: Symptoms that occur when drug use is discontinued or reduced in dosage. The term covers withdrawal from smoking and alcohol as well as therapeutic and recreational drugs. Symptoms may vary depending on the drug involved and the level of dependence.
  • Teeth grinding: Grinding teeth when asleep
  • Teething: Condition when an infant gets a new tooth.
  • Temazepam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Temazepam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Thiamine deficiency: Dietary deficiency of vitamin B1 (thiamine)
  • Thyroid disorders: Any disorder of the thyroid gland.
  • Tranquilizer addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use tranquilizers on a regular basis. Tranquilizers are often prescribed for the treatment of anxiety and sleeping problems but chronic use can lead to dependence on the drug. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Tranquilizer withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when tranquilzer use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Tranquilizers includes benzodiazepines such as valium, rohypnol and serepax.
  • Traumatic Brain Injury: Brain injury from trauma or accident.
  • Trigeminal neuralgia: Trigeminal neuralgia is a very painful inflammation of the nerve (trigeminal nerve) that delivers sensations to the face and "surface" of the eye.
  • Under-diagnosed conditions: Any medical condition that is undiagnosed
  • Variegate porphyria: A rare metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency of a certain enzyme which results in a build-up in the body of porphyrins or their precursors. This form of hepatic porphyria causes the sufferer to have acute attacks as well as skin sensitivity.
  • Vicodin withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Vicodin use is discontinued or reduced. Vicodin is a pain-killing drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Vitamin B1 toxicity: Excessive consumption of vitamin B1 (thiamine) can cause symptoms of toxicity.
  • Vitamin B12 Deficiency: A deficiency of Vitamin B12 primarily causes anemias the body is unable to make sufficient quantities of normal red blood cells. Severe cases can lead to permanent nervous system problems. The vitamin B12 deficiency can result from absorption problems, insufficient dietary intake, certain medications (e.g. metformin), inherited conditions (e.g. transcobalamin deficiency) and certain chronic parasitic intestinal infestations.
  • Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: A rare degenerative brain disorder caused by thiamine (Vitamin B1) deficiency. Chronic alcoholics are prone to this condition.
  • West African Trypanosomiasis: West African sleeping sickness from the tsetse fly
  • Whiplash: Neck injury often from a car accident.
  • Whiplash Injuries: An injury to the neck when the neck is rapidly forced backward and then forwards or vice versa. It most commonly occurs in vehicle accidents when the vehicle is stopped abruptly or pushed forwards suddenly.
  • Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome: An inherited immune system disorder that affects only males and is characterized by recurring infections, eczema and reduced level of blood platelets (thrombocytopenia).
  • Worm conditions: Any condition that is caused by infestation of worms
  • Xanax withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Xanax use is discontinued or reduced. Xanax is a central nervous system depressant. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.

 

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