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Glossary for Lymphatic system tumors

  • Adult T-Cell lymphoma: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis. The lymphoma subtype is aggressive and tends to affect the lymph nodes more than the blood.
  • Anaplastic large cell lymphoma: A rare type of cancer where a tumor develops in lymph tissue and usually consists of white blood cells and null cells. It is a form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The tumors can develop in more than one lymph node and can also occur in the skin and various organs such as the liver, bones or lungs.
  • Anaplastic small cell lymphoma: A rare type of cancer where a tumor develops in lymph tissue and consists mainly of small cells. It is a form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The tumors can develop in more than one lymph node and can also occur in the skin and various organs such as the liver, bones or lungs.
  • Angiofollicular ganglionic hyperplasia: A rare disorder characterized by a localized overgrowth of lymph node tissue which can form a benign tumor-like growth. The symptoms are determined by the location and number of growths. There are two types of the disease: hyaline-vascular type or the plasma cell type which tends to have more severe symptoms.
  • Angiofollicular ganglionic hyperplasia -- plasma cell type: A rare disorder characterized by a localized overgrowth of lymph node tissue which can form a benign tumor-like growth. There are two types of the disease: hyaline-vascular type or the plasma cell type which tends to have more severe symptoms. The plasma-cell type tends to involve systemic symptoms such as fever and weight loss due to the destruction of red blood cells.
  • Angiofollicular lymph hyperplasia: A rare disorder of the lymph system characterized by the development of benign tumors in lymph tissue anywhere in the body.
  • Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma: A form of cancer which tends to be systemic in nature and thus cancer cells can be found in various parts of the body such as the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, skin and bone marrow.
  • Angiomyomatous Hamartoma: A type of tumor that originates from blood vessel tissue. It is a rare type of tumor that tends to occur most often in lymph nodes in the inguinal (lower abdominal and groin) area.
  • Appendiceal tumor: A tumor of the appendix. The condition is often misdiagnosed as acute appendicitis. The cancer usually metastasizes from other sites and rarely starts in the appendix.
  • Appendix cancer: Cancer of the appendix. The cancer usually metastasizes from other sites and rarely starts in the appendix.
  • B-cell lymphomas: A group cancers involving the proliferation of lymphocytic B-cells. Examples include small lymphocytic lymphoma, immunoblastic lymphoma and lymphoblastic lymphoma.
  • Benign lymphoma: A lymphatic tumor which is not cancerous. There are usually no symptoms other than a lump at the site of the lymphoma.
  • Burkitt's lymphoma: Lymphoma associated with Epstein Barr virus.
  • Central nervous system lymphoma, primary: A type of lymphoma that occurs in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). A lymphoma consists of cancerous lymphocytes which are a type of white blood cell. Symptoms vary according to the location of the lymphoma.
  • Classical Hodgkin disease: Hodgkin's disease is a type of cancer characterized by the abnormal proliferation of a type of white blood cell called lymphocyte. Hodgkin's lymphoma is classified into classical types and nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The nodular form tends to be more localized than the classical form. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is further subdivided into four subgroups depending on the cell composition of the lymphoma: nodular sclerosing, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte rich and lymphocyte depleted.
  • Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: A malignancy of the T-cells which make up part of the body's immune system. The cancer is characterized by the excessive proliferation of T-cells which are a type of white blood cell. The degree of skin involvement is variable.
  • Cutaneous lymphoma: Cutaneous lymphoma is a term used to describe a group of lymphoproliferative disorders characterized by localization of neoplastic T lymphocytes to the skin.
  • Death: The cessation of life
  • Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: A common form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma characterized by abnormal proliferation of B-lymphocytes. It is a cancer of the B-lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) which, if untreated, can spread to other parts of the body such as the bones and the liver. It differs from follicular lymphoma in that it is a high-grade lymphoma that usually develops rapidly. Follicular lymphoma often transforms into diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
  • Enteropathy type T-cell lymphoma: A rare subtype of gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Uncontrolled celiac disease appears to be a risk factor for developing this type of lymphoma.
  • Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma: An aggressive form of lymphoma that is generally only associated with celiac disease.
  • Extra-upper Aerodigestive Tract NK/T cell lymphoma: A form of lymphoma that occurs externally to the lymph nodes but is located in sites other than the upper aerodigestive tract, nasopharynx and nasal cavity. This particular type of lymphoma is rare but tends to be aggressive.
  • Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue: A rare type of cancer where the B cells (a type of white blood cell) in lymph tissue associated with mucosa begin to proliferate. The cancer can affect any mucosal membrane tissue but is most common in the gastric mucosal membranes. Symptoms may vary considerable depending on the stage and location of the cancer.
  • Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma: A form of lymphoma that occurs externally to the lymph nodes. It usually in the nasal area but can also occur in the gastrointestinal tract, trachea, skin, liver and other soft tissues. This particular type of lymphoma is rare but tends to be aggressive.
  • Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal: A form of lymphoma that occurs externally to the lymph nodes and in particular, is located in the nasal region. This particular type of lymphoma is rare but tends to be aggressive. It is often associated with the Epstein-Barr virus.
  • Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type: A form of lymphoma that occurs externally to the lymph nodes. It usually in the nasal area but can also occur in the gastrointestinal tract, trachea or skin. This particular type of lymphoma is rare but tends to be aggressive. Specific symptoms will vary depending on the exact location of the tumor.
  • Fatigue: Excessive tiredness or weakness.
  • Fever: Elevation of the body temperature above the normal 37 degrees celsius
  • Follicular Lymphoma, Susceptibility to, 1: Follicular lymphoma is a form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma characterized by an abnormal proliferation of B-lymphocytes. It is a cancer of the B-lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) which, if untreated, can spread to other parts of the body such as the bones and the liver. It differs from diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in that it is a low-grade lymphoma that usually develops slowly. Follicular lymphoma often transforms into diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Susceptibility type 1 means that a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.33 makes a person more susceptible to developing follicular lymphoma.
  • Follicular dendritic cell tumor: A rare form of malignant tumor. Follicular dendritic cells are immune system cells found in lymph follicles. The tumor tends to be low grade and tends to reoccur after removal and occasionally metastasizes. The symptoms are determined by the location and size of the tumor. The tumor can occur on various parts of the body such as lymph nodes, tonsils, armpits and mediastinum but is most common in the neck lymph nodes.
  • Follicular lymphoma: A form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma characterized by an abnormal proliferation of B-lymphocytes. It is a cancer of the B-lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) which, if untreated, can spread to other parts of the body such as the bones and the liver. It differs from diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in that it is a low-grade lymphoma that usually develops slowly. Follicular lymphoma often transforms into diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
  • Gastric lymphoma: A rare type of tumor that occurs in the lining of the stomach. The tumor may be primary or have spread there from other parts of the body. This type of tumor is more common in old people.
  • Heptaosplenic T-cell Lymphoma: A rare subtype of lymphoma which originates from T-cell lymphocytes in the liver and the spleen. This form of lymphoma is considered quite aggressive. People with solid organ transplants tend to be more susceptible to this form of cancer, possibility because of the need to take immune suppressing drugs to avoid rejection of the transplanted organ.
  • Hodgkin disease, X-linked pseudoautosomal: An inherited form of Hodgkin disease which is a common cancer of the lymph node.
  • Hodgkin lymphoma, childhood: A type of cancer that originates from lymphocytes (white blood cells). It is more common during adolescence but can occur during childhood.
  • Hodgkin lymphoma, during pregnancy: A cancer of the lymph system that occurs during pregnancy. The dilemma is that treatment can't be initiated until the baby is delivered or terminated. If the pregnancy is in the early stages, termination is recommended. If the pregnancy is in the later stages when the lymphoma occurs, the baby is usually delivered as early as safely possible in order to commence cancer treatment as soon as possible. The more prompt the treatment, the better the prognosis.
  • Hodgkin's Disease: A form of cancer that affects the lymphatic system.
  • Hodgkin's disease, adult: A type of cancer that affects the lymphatic system in adults. The lymphatic system forms part of the body's immune system. This type of cancer can also occur in children.
  • Hodgkin's disease, childhood: A type of cancer that affects the lymphatic system in children. The lymphatic system forms part of the body's immune system. This type of cancer can also occur in children.
  • Hodgkin's disease, nodular sclerosis: Hodgkin's disease is a type of cancer characterized by the abnormal proliferation of a type of white blood cell called lymphocyte. Hodgkin's lymphoma is classified into classical types and nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The nodular form tends to be more localized than the classical form. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is further subdivided into four subgroups depending on the cell composition of the lymphoma: nodular sclerosing, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte rich and lymphocyte depleted. The nodular sclerosing form is the most common subtype of classical Hodgkin's disease.
  • Hypertrichosis lanuginosa, acquired: Excessive hair growth associated with certain cancers such as lymphoma or cancers involving the digestive system, bronchi, uterus, ovary or urinary tract. Metabolic disorders, certain drugs or anorexia nervosa may also cause the excessive hair growth. The excessive hair growth can occur on the face, neck, limbs and trunk. The hair growth may be patchy or cover most of the body and the hair is usually fine and pale.
  • Langerhans cell sarcoma: A rare cancerous growth of Langerhans cells that can develop in the lymph nodes, skin, liver, spleen and bones.
  • Littoral cell angioma of the spleen: A usually benign type of tumor that develops in the spleen. The name arises from the fact that the tumor develops from the littoral cells which line the blood vessels in the spleen.
  • Lymph node neoplasm: Lymph node tumor.
  • Lymphangiomas: A form of angioma caused by lymph vessels
  • Lymphatic neoplasm: A tumor that develops in lymphatic tissue. The tumor may be cancerous or benign.
  • Lymphoblastic lymphoma: A cancer of the lymph system which usually involves immature T-lymphocytes and sometimes B-lymphocytes. The cancer usually affects the mediastinum (between the lungs), bone marrow, brain and spinal cord.
  • Lymphocyte depletion Hodgkin's disease: Hodgkin's disease is a type of cancer characterized by the abnormal proliferation of a type of white blood cell called lymphocyte. Hodgkin's lymphoma is classified into classical types and nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The nodular form tends to be more localized than the classical form. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is further subdivided into four subgroups depending on the cell composition of the lymphoma: nodular sclerosing, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte rich and lymphocyte depleted. The lymphocyte depleted form is the least common form of Hodgkin's disease.
  • Lymphoma: Cancer involving lymph nodes and the immune system.
  • Lymphoma of the breast: Lymphomas of the breast are rare, accounting for 1.7% to 2.2% of extranodal lymphomas and 0.38% to 0.7% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Although secondary breast lymphomas are also rare, they represent the largest group of metastatic tumors of the breast.
  • Lymphoma, AIDS-related: HIV patients face an increased risk of various infections and cancers. AIDS-related lymphoma is lymphoma that occurs in AIDS patients. Lymphomas are white blood cell cancers (white blood cells form part of the body's immune system).
  • Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Follicular: A cancer of cells in the immune system. The cancer is comprised of large cells and tends to be aggressive and metastasizes readily.
  • Lymphoma, Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue: Malignancies that occur in the lymphoid tissue found in mucosal linings (MALT) e.g. gastrointestinal tract, skin and lungs. Symptoms may vary considerably depending on which organs are involved but usually the stomach is involved. A significant portion of patients suffering from MALTomas also have autoimmune diseases.
  • Lymphoma, gastric non-Hodgkins type: A very rare form of malignant stomach cancer involving lymph tissue.
  • Lymphoma, large-cell: A cancer of cells in the immune system. The cancer is comprised of large cells and tends to be aggressive and metastasizes readily.
  • Lymphoma, large-cell, immunoblastic: A cancer of the immune system characterized by the presence of immunoblasts. Immunoblasts are T cells which have been transformed due to stimulation by an antigen.
  • Lymphoma, small cleaved-cell, diffuse: A slow-growing cancer of the lymph system that involves small cells. The diffuse form has no distinguishable pattern of progression through the lymph node.
  • Lymphoma, small cleaved-cell, follicular: A slow-growing cancer of the lymph system consisting of small cells that can circulate readily in the blood. The cancer occurs in a follicular pattern. Despite it's ability to spread, the cancer tends to be less aggressive than the large cell variety.
  • Mantle cell lymphoma: A form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (a cancer of the B-lymphocytes) which has a very poor prognosis with the 5-year survival rate being about 25%. The lymphoma can spread to other parts of the body such as the liver, spleen or bone marrow.
  • Metastatic cancer: Any cancer that has spread to other parts of the body.
  • Metastatic lymph cancer: Metastasis is a complex series of steps in which cancer cells leave the original tumor site and migrate to other parts of the body via the lymphatic system.
  • Mixed cellularity Hodgkin's disease: Hodgkin's disease is a type of cancer characterized by the abnormal proliferation of a type of white blood cell called lymphocyte. Hodgkin's lymphoma is classified into classical types and nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The nodular form tends to be more localized than the classical form. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is further subdivided into four subgroups depending on the cell composition of the lymphoma: nodular sclerosing, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte rich and lymphocyte depleted. The mixed cellularity type if often associated with infection with HIV or Epstein Barr virus.
  • Multi-centric Castleman's Disease: A rare disorder characterized by a generalized overgrowth of lymph node tissue which forms a tumor-like growth. This form of Castleman's disease is progressive and can be serious.
  • Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma: An uncommon form of Hodgkin lymphoma (an immune system cancer) characterized by the presence of nodular lymphocytes representing a nodular growth pattern of the cancer.
  • Nodular sclerosing Hodgkin's lymphoma: Hodgkin's disease is a type of cancer characterized by the abnormal proliferation of a type of white blood cell called lymphocyte. Hodgkin's lymphoma is classified into classical types and nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The nodular form tends to be more localized than the classical form. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is further subdivided into four subgroups depending on the cell composition of the lymphoma: nodular sclerosing, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte rich and lymphocyte depleted.
  • Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A type of lymphoma, a cancer affecting lymph nodes and the immune system.
  • Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, during pregnancy: A cancer that originates in the lymphatic system and occurs during pregnancy. The greatest problem is the fact that the cancer is usually quite aggressive and delays in delivery often results in delayed treatment and a poor prognosis.
  • Orbital lymphoma: A tumor that develops in the soft tissue of the eye socket and can push against the eye causing problems with vision and eye movement.
  • Peripheral T-cell lymphoma: An aggressive form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma characterized by the proliferation of abnormal T-lymphocytes that circulate in the blood in the peripheral parts of the body. It is a rapidly growing lymphoma.
  • Primary effusion lymphoma: A cancerous proliferation of lymphocytic B-cells caused by the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus). It is more prevalent in immunodeficient people such as AIDS patients. The cancer tends to occur in the lining of body cavities such as the pericardium and peritoneum. The cancerous cells are detected in the fluid secreted from the lining of the cavity.
  • Primary malignant lymphoma: The excessive proliferation of lymphocytes which forms part of the immune system. Primary cancers refer to the fact that the cancer originated in the lymph cells rather than having metastasized.
  • Sezary syndrome: A rare type of lymphoma characterized by skin redness, leukemia and enlarged lymph nodes.
  • Small non-cleaved cell lymphoma:
  • Spleen Cancer: Malignancy of white blood cells with tumour deposits in the spleen.
  • Spleen neoplasm: A tumor that originates in the spleen.
  • Swollen lymph glands: The occurrence of lymph glands which are swollen
  • T-cell lymphoma 1A: T-cell lymphoma 1A is a type of cancer that has genetic origins. The genetic defect is located on chromosome 14q32.1. The anomaly is usually implicated in t-cell prolymphocytic leukemia. The cancer is usually aggressive and tends to target the blood, bone marrow, lymph nodes, liver, spleen and skin. The cancer is generally quite rare and tends to occur in people over the age of 30.
  • T-cell lymphoma of the skin: Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a term that describes a group of lymphoproliferative disorders characterized by localization of neoplastic T lymphocytes to the skin.
  • Thymic epithelial tumor: A tumor that develops in the outer layers (epithelial) layers of the thymus. The tumor may be malignant or benign. The thymus produces white blood cells.
  • Thymoma: A condition which is characterized by s tumour derived from the epithelial cells of the thymus
  • Thymus Cancer: Cancer that occurs in the thymus
  • Tonsil cancer: A disorder characterised by malignancy that is located on the tonsils
  • Upper Aerodigestive Tract NK/T cell lymphoma: A form of lymphoma that occurs externally to the lymph nodes but is located in the upper aerodigestive tract. It includes tumors in the nasopharynx, nasal cavity as well as the upper aerodigestive tract. This particular type of lymphoma is rare but tends to be aggressive.
  • Weight loss: Loss of body weight.

 

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