Assessment
Questionnaire

Have a symptom?
See what questions
a doctor would ask.
 

What is Megaloblastic anemia?

What is Megaloblastic anemia?

  • Megaloblastic anemia: A rare blood disorder where insufficient vitamin B12 absorption results in reduced production of red blood cells and increased levels of abnormal, enlarged red blood cells (megaloblasts). Vitamin B12 insufficiency can result from absorption problems or lack of dietary intake of the vitamin or folic acid.
  • Megaloblastic anemia: anemias associated with impaired DNA synthesis in bone marrow progenitor cells leading to odd shaped, macrocytic, or dysfunctional erythrocytes; usually caused by B12 or folate deficiency.
    Source - Diseases Database
  • Megaloblastic anemia: anemia characterized by many large immature and dysfunctional red blood cells (megaloblasts) in the bone marrow; associated with pernicious anemia.
    Source - WordNet 2.1

Megaloblastic anemia is listed as a "rare disease" by the Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This means that Megaloblastic anemia, or a subtype of Megaloblastic anemia, affects less than 200,000 people in the US population.
Source - National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Megaloblastic anemia: Introduction

Types of Megaloblastic anemia:

Broader types of Megaloblastic anemia:

Who gets Megaloblastic anemia?

Racial predominance for Megaloblastic anemia: Most cases have been diagnosed in Eastern Mediterranean countries.

How serious is Megaloblastic anemia?

Complications of Megaloblastic anemia: see complications of Megaloblastic anemia

What causes Megaloblastic anemia?

Causes of Megaloblastic anemia: see causes of Megaloblastic anemia
Cause of Megaloblastic anemia: The condition originates from a genetic defect which is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner.

What are the symptoms of Megaloblastic anemia?

Symptoms of Megaloblastic anemia: see symptoms of Megaloblastic anemia

Complications of Megaloblastic anemia: see complications of Megaloblastic anemia

Onset of Megaloblastic anemia: Usually during the first 5 years of life.

Can anyone else get Megaloblastic anemia?

Inheritance: see inheritance of Megaloblastic anemia

Megaloblastic anemia: Testing

Diagnostic testing: see tests for Megaloblastic anemia.

Misdiagnosis: see misdiagnosis and Megaloblastic anemia.

How is it treated?

Doctors and Medical Specialists for Megaloblastic anemia: Hematologist ; see also doctors and medical specialists for Megaloblastic anemia.
Treatments for Megaloblastic anemia: see treatments for Megaloblastic anemia
Research for Megaloblastic anemia: see research for Megaloblastic anemia

Name and Aliases of Megaloblastic anemia

Main name of condition: Megaloblastic anemia

Other names or spellings for Megaloblastic anemia:

MGA1, Imerslund-grasbeck syndrome, Pernicious anemia, juvenile, due to selective intestinal malabsorption of vitamin b12, with proteinuria, Enterocyte cobalamin malabsorption, Enterocyte intrinsic factor receptor, defect of

Megaloblastic anaemia Source - Diseases Database

Megaloblastic anaemia
Source - WordNet 2.1

Enterocyte cobalamin malabsorption, Enterocyte intrinsic factor receptor, defect of, Imerslund-grasbeck syndrome, MGA1, Pernicious anemia, juvenile, due to selective intestinal malabsorption of vitamin b12, with proteinuria
Source - Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Megaloblastic anemia: Related Conditions

Research the causes of these diseases that are similar to, or related to, Megaloblastic anemia:

 

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use. Information provided on this site is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information on this site is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs. Please see our Terms of Use.

Home | Symptoms | Diseases | Diagnosis | Videos | Tools | Forum | About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Site Map | Advertise