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Treatments for Multiple Myeloma

Treatment List for Multiple Myeloma

The list of treatments mentioned in various sources for Multiple Myeloma includes the following list. Always seek professional medical advice about any treatment or change in treatment plans.

Multiple Myeloma: Is the Diagnosis Correct?

The first step in getting correct treatment is to get a correct diagnosis. Differential diagnosis list for Multiple Myeloma may include:

Multiple Myeloma: Marketplace Products, Discounts & Offers

Products, offers and promotion categories available for Multiple Myeloma:

Multiple Myeloma: Research Doctors & Specialists

Research all specialists including ratings, affiliations, and sanctions.

Drugs and Medications used to treat Multiple Myeloma:

Note:You must always seek professional medical advice about any prescription drug, OTC drug, medication, treatment or change in treatment plans.

Some of the different medications used in the treatment of Multiple Myeloma include:

Unlabeled Drugs and Medications to treat Multiple Myeloma:

Unlabelled alternative drug treatments for Multiple Myeloma include:

Latest treatments for Multiple Myeloma:

The following are some of the latest treatments for Multiple Myeloma:

Hospital statistics for Multiple Myeloma:

These medical statistics relate to hospitals, hospitalization and Multiple Myeloma:

  • 0.38% (48,041) of hospital consultant episodes were for multiple myeloma and malignant plasma cell neoplasms in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 96% of hospital consultant episodes for multiple myeloma and malignant plasma cell neoplasms required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 54% of hospital consultant episodes for multiple myeloma and malignant plasma cell neoplasms were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 45% of hospital consultant episodes for multiple myeloma and malignant plasma cell neoplasms were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 9% of hospital consultant episodes for multiple myeloma and malignant plasma cell neoplasms required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
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Hospitals & Medical Clinics: Multiple Myeloma

Research quality ratings and patient incidents/safety measures for hospitals and medical facilities in specialties related to Multiple Myeloma:

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Choosing the Best Treatment Hospital: More general information, not necessarily in relation to Multiple Myeloma, on hospital and medical facility performance and surgical care quality:

Medical news summaries about treatments for Multiple Myeloma:

The following medical news items are relevant to treatment of Multiple Myeloma:

Discussion of treatments for Multiple Myeloma:

What You Need To Know About Multiple Myeloma: NCI (Excerpt)

To plan a patient's treatment, the doctor needs to know the stage, or extent, of the disease. Staging is a careful attempt to find out what parts of the body are affected by the cancer. Treatment decisions depend on these findings. Results of the patient's exam, blood tests, and bone marrow tests can help doctors determine the stage of the disease. In addition, staging usually involves a series of x-rays to determine the number and size of tumors in the bones. In some cases, a patient will have MRI if closeup views of the bones are needed. (Source: excerpt from What You Need To Know About Multiple Myeloma: NCI)

What You Need To Know About Multiple Myeloma: NCI (Excerpt)

People who have multiple myeloma but do not have symptoms of the disease usually do not receive treatment. For these patients, the risks and side effects of treatment are likely to outweigh the possible benefits. However, these patients are watched closely, and they begin treatment when symptoms appear. Patients who need treatment for multiple myeloma usually receive chemotherapy and sometimes radiation therapy .

Chemotherapy is the use of drugs to treat cancer. It is the main treatment for multiple myeloma. Doctors may prescribe two or more drugs that work together to kill myeloma cells. Many of these drugs are taken by mouth; others are injected into a blood vessel. Either way, the drugs travel through the bloodstream, reaching myeloma cells all over the body. For this reason, chemotherapy is called systemic therapy .

Anticancer drugs often are given in cycles -- a treatment period followed by a rest period, then another treatment and rest period, and so on. Most patients take their chemotherapy at home, as outpatients at the hospital, or at the doctor's office. However, depending on their health and the drugs being given, patients may need to stay in the hospital during treatment.

Radiation therapy (also called radiotherapy) uses high-energy rays to damage cancer cells and stop them from growing. In this form of treatment, a large machine aims the rays at a tumor and the area close to it. Treatment with radiation is local therapy ; it affects only the cells in the treated area.

Radiation therapy is the main treatment for people who have a single plasmacytoma. They usually receive radiation therapy every weekday for 4 to 5 weeks in the outpatient department of a hospital or clinic.

People who have multiple myeloma sometimes receive radiation therapy in addition to chemotherapy. The purpose of the radiation therapy is to help control the growth of tumors in the bones and relieve the pain that these tumors cause. Treatment usually lasts for 1 to 2 weeks. (Source: excerpt from What You Need To Know About Multiple Myeloma: NCI)

What You Need To Know About Multiple Myeloma: NCI (Excerpt)

The complications of multiple myeloma can affect many parts of the body. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy often can help control complications such as pain, bone damage, and kidney problems. However, from time to time, most patients need additional treatment to manage these and other problems caused by the disease. This type of treatment, called supportive care, is given to improve patients' comfort and quality of life.

Patients with multiple myeloma frequently have pain caused by bone damage or by tumors pressing on nerves. Doctors often suggest that patients take pain medicine and/or wear a back or neck brace to help relieve their pain. Some patients find that techniques such as relaxation and imagery can reduce their pain. These and other methods of relieving pain are discussed in the booklet Pain Control: A Guide for People with Cancer and Their Families.

Preventing or treating bone fractures is another important part of supportive care. Because exercise can reduce the loss of calcium from the bones, doctors and nurses encourage patients to be active, if possible. They may suggest appropriate forms of exercise. If a patient has a fracture or a breakdown of certain bones, especially those in the spine, a surgeon may need to operate to remove as much of the cancer as possible and to strengthen the bone.

Patients who have hypercalcemia may be given medicine to reduce the level of calcium in the blood. They also are encouraged to drink large amounts of fluids every day; some may need intravenous (IV ) fluids. Getting plenty of fluids helps the kidneys get rid of excess calcium in the blood. It also helps prevent problems that occur when calcium collects in the kidneys.

If the kidneys aren't working well, dialysis or plasmapheresis may be necessary. In dialysis, the patient's blood passes through a machine that removes wastes, and the blood is then returned to the patient. Plasmapheresis is used to remove excess antibodies produced by the myeloma cells. This process thins the blood, making it easier for the kidneys and the heart to function.

Multiple myeloma weakens the immune system. Patients must be very careful to protect themselves from infection. It is important that they stay out of crowds and away from people with colds or other infectious diseases. Any sign of infection (fever, sore throat, cough) should be reported to the doctor right away. Patients who develop infections are treated with antibiotics or other drugs.

Patients who have anemia may have transfusions of red blood cells. Transfusions can help reduce the shortness of breath and fatigue that can be caused by anemia. (Source: excerpt from What You Need To Know About Multiple Myeloma: NCI)

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