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Diseases » Muscle weakness » Glossary
 

Glossary for Muscle weakness

  • 2-Methylbutyric Aciduria: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • 2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • 3-alpha-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • 3-alpha-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • ACAD9 deficiency: A metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-9). The symptoms are variable and are usually triggered by a viral infection or ingestion of aspirin which can trigger a Reye-like episode which can cause death.
  • ACTH Deficiency: A rare endocrine disorder involving a lack of ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) and low levels of cortisol and steroid hormones.
  • ACTH deficiency, isolated: An inherited deficiency of adrenocorticotropic hormone. The condition results from a genetic defect.
  • APECED Syndrome: APECED is a recessively inherited genetic disease characterized by the presence of two of the following three conditions: impaired parathyroid function, yeast infection (candidiasis) and impaired adrenal gland function (Addison's disease). It is an autoimmune disease resulting from a genetic defect. The body's immune system malfunctions and attacks it's own body tissues.
  • Abetalipoproteinemia: A rare disorder involving abnormalities in fat metabolism. The resulting insufficiency of fats and vitamins affect the normal development and function of the body.
  • Acute intermittent porphyria: A rare metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency in the porphobilinogen deaminase enzyme which results in a build-up of porphyrins or its precursors in the body. Using certain drugs or eating certain foods can trigger the symptoms of the condition.
  • Addison's Disease: A rare progressive hormonal disorder characterized by insufficient production of certain hormones called adrenal corticosteroids.
  • Adhesive abuse: Adhesive abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Adhesives include household glues, rubber cement and model aeroplane glue. These adhesives can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Adhesive addiction: Adhesive addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse adhesives (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Adhesives includes household glue, rubber cement and model airplane glue.
  • Adrenal Cancer: A malignant cancer that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids. Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal Cortex Diseases: Diseases of the adrenal cortex. Examples includes Addison's disease, Cushing's syndrome and adrenal fatigue.
  • Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: A tumor that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids.
  • Adrenal adenoma, familial: A benign tumor that develops in the adrenal gland and tends to run in families. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids . Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal disorders: Disorders affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal gland hyperfunction: Excessive activity of the adrenal gland which causes excessive production of one or more adrenal hormones (aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine). The increased adrenal gland activity may be caused by an adrenal gland tumor or by excessive stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal incidentaloma: A tumor of the adrenal gland that is discovered incidentally while performing an imaging examination for reasons other than an adrenal tumor. The tumor may be asymptomatic or can causes excessive secretion of adrenal hormones and resulting symptoms. The tumor may also be malignant or benign.
  • Adrenocortical carcinoma: A condition which is characterized by malignancy which affects the adrenocortex.
  • Adrenoleukodystrophy, autosomal, neonatal form: A rare inherited disorder involving the adrenal glands, testes and certain parts of the brain (white matter). It is a less severe form of leukodystrophy where an abnormality within the body cells prevents the metabolism of certain fats (long chain fatty acids).
  • Adult SMA: Form of Spinal Muscular Atrophy in adults.
  • Adult progressive spinal muscular atrophy, Aran Duchenne type: A group of inherited motor neuron diseases involving progressive muscle weakness, wasting and paralysis due to degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord. Muscle weakness and wasting usually starts in the hands and may gradually spread to other muscle groups.
  • Aerosol abuse: Aerosol abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Aerosols include air fresheners, hair spray, spray pain and deodorants. These aerosols can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Aerosol addiction: Aerosol addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse aerosol (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Aerosols includes spray pain, air freshener, deodorants and hair sprays.
  • Alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing syndrome: The excessive consumption of alcohol can result in symptoms similar to a condition called Cushing's syndrome. When alcohol consumption is stopped, symptoms regress.
  • Aldehyde syndrome: A metabolic anomaly where consumption of alcohol results in high levels of blood acetaldehyde which causes a variety of symptoms.
  • Aldolase A deficiency: A rare condition where a deficiency of the enzyme called aldolase A causes muscle problems and anemia.
  • Alkalosis: Blood alkalinity levels too high (opposite of acidosis)
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A motor neuron disease involving progressive degeneration and eventual destruction of the function of nerves that control voluntary movement.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, type 6: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 16q12.
  • Arachnoiditis: A progressive disorder where the arachnoid membrane becomes inflamed and the brain and spinal cord may also become inflamed.
  • Arthrogryposis: A rare congenital disorder characterized by reduced mobility of joints due to the build up of fibrous tissue in the joint.
  • Ataxia, Hereditary, Autosomal Dominant: A group of rare, dominantly inherited neuromuscular disorder involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord. The range, progression and severity of symptoms can vary quite considerably depending on the genetic defect involved.
  • Athabaskan severe combined immunodeficiency: A severe immunodeficiency disorder found in Navajo and Apache populations.
  • Autoimmune peripheral neuropathy: Damage to peripheral nerves that occurs when the body's own immune system attacks it.
  • Back tumour: The presence of tumour growth in the vertebra, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast.
  • Balsam apple poisoning: The Balsam apple is a climbing vine which produces yellowish fruit. The fruit contains toxins - resin, saponic glycoside and alkaloids - which can cause various symptoms if eaten. Large amounts of the fruit or seeds to be consumed to cause toxicity. The leaves of the plant may be cooked, drained and eaten safely.
  • Balsam pear poisoning: The Balsam pear is a climbing vine which produces yellowish fruit. The fruit contains toxins - resin, saponic glycoside and alkaloids - which can cause various symptoms if eaten. Large amounts of the fruit or seeds to be consumed to cause toxicity. The leaves of the plant may be cooked, drained and eaten safely.
  • Bassoe syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by hypogonadism, cataracts during infancy and muscle weakness.
  • Becker Muscular Dystrophy: A muscular dystrophy charaterised by enlargement of muscles
  • Bethlem myopathy: A rare, slow-progressing, genetic muscle disorder where the muscle gradually weaken and become wasted.
  • Black widow spider envenomation: The black widow spider bite is toxic to the nerves and can cause serious symptoms. The black widow spider is most commonly found in North America.
  • Borud Syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by numerous features including hearing and vision problems, heart muscle disease, ataxia and peripheral neuropathy.
  • Bottlebrush buckeye poisoning: The Bottlebrush buckeye is a deciduous shrub which bears clusters of white or pink flowers and smooth, leathery fruit containing shiny seeds. The plant originated in southern USA. The plant contains various toxic chemicals (glycoside esculin, saponin aescin) which can cause potentially fatal toxicity if sufficient quantities of the seeds or leaves are consumed.
  • Botulism food poisoning: Extremely dangerous food poisoning requiring medical attention, but not always recognized because of its non-abdominal symptoms.
  • Cachexia: physical wasting with loss of weight and muscle mass caused by disease
  • California buckeye poisoning: The California buckeye is a deciduous shrub which bears clusters of white or pink flowers and smooth, leathery fruit containing shiny seeds. The plant originated in California. The plant contains various toxic chemicals (glycoside esculin, saponin aescin) which can cause potentially fatal toxicity if sufficient quantities of the seeds or leaves are consumed.
  • Camera-Marugo-Cohen syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, muscle weakness, obesity and an asymmetrical body.
  • Camurat-Engelmann disease, type 2: A rare syndrome characterized by a range of abnormalities including waddling gait, muscle weakness, knee and hip contractures, delayed puberty and leg pain.
  • Camurati Engelmann disease, type 2: A rare disorder (described in two patients) which has similar symptoms to the genetic condition called Camurati Engelmann disease but the genetic defect responsible for type 1 is not present in type 2. Type 2 has additional bone abnormalities which were noted on radiographs. Patients tend to suffer flare-ups of their condition which is accompanied by severe pain which may leave the patient incapacitated. Flare-ups can be triggered or made worse by stress, exhaustion, exercise, growth spurts, standing too long, walking too long, infection, illness, injury, surgery, cold weather and sudden changes in air pressure.
  • Camurati-Engelmann Disease: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by diaphyseal dysplasia, muscle weakness and leg pain.
  • Cardioencephalomyopathy fatal infantile due to cytochrome c oxidase deficiency: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where the body doesn't have enough of an enzyme called cytochrome C oxidase (COX) which is needed in the process of energy production by body cells. The fatal infant type generally affects the hear, brain and kidneys as well as the muscles.
  • Carnitine Deficiency Syndromes: Syndromes associated with the deficiency of carnitine.
  • Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase I Deficiency: A very rare inherited deficiency of a particular enzyme (Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1) prevents fatty acids being transported to the part of the cell that converts it to energy.
  • Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase II Deficiency: A very rare inherited deficiency of a particular enzyme (Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1) prevents fatty acids being transported to the part of the cell that converts it to energy. There are two main subtypes of the disorder with each involving a slightly different form of the enzyme. Type I can be readily managed through diet. Type II has three subtypes: the myopathic form affects mainly the muscles; the hepatocardiomuscular form affects the liver and heart muscle; and the lethal neonatal form affects muscles and organs and usually results in death during the first year of life.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 deficiency: A very rare inherited deficiency of a particular enzyme (Carnitine palmitoyl transferase I) prevents fatty acids being transported to the part of the cell that converts it to energy.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 2 deficiency: A very rare inherited deficiency of a particular enzyme (Carnitine palmitoyl transferase) which prevents fatty acids being transported to the part of the cell that converts it to energy. There are two main subtypes of the disorder with each involving a slightly different form of the enzyme. Type I can be readily managed through diet. Type II has three subtypes: the myopathic form affects mainly the muscles; the hepatocardiomuscular form affects the liver and heart muscle; and the lethal neonatal form affects muscles and organs and usually results in death during the first year of life.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase II deficiency, infantile hepatocardiomuscular type: A very rare metabolic disorder where deficiency of a particular enzyme (CPT II) prevents muscle fats being converted to energy. The infantile form of this disease affects the muscles and the liver and heart.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase II deficiency, lethal neonatal form: A very rare metabolic disorder where deficiency of a particular enzyme (CPT II) prevents muscle fats being converted to energy. The lethal neonatal form affects various organs as well as the muscles and death usually occurs during the first year of life.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase II deficiency, myopathic: A very rare metabolic disorder where deficiency of a particular enzyme (CPT II) prevents muscle fats being converted to energy. Prolonged exercise can cause an episode of muscle symptoms. The myopathic form of the condition is the least severe and tends to affect only the muscles.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase deficiency: A very rare inherited deficiency of a particular enzyme (Carnitine palmitoyl transferase) which prevents fatty acids being transported to the part of the cell that converts it to energy. There are two main subtypes of the disorder with each involving a slightly different form of the enzyme. Type I can be readily managed through diet. Type II has three subtypes: the myopathic form affects mainly the muscles; the hepatocardiomuscular form affects the liver and heart muscle; and the lethal neonatal form affects muscles and organs and usually results in death during the first year of life.
  • Carnitine transporter deficiency: An inherited deficiency of carnitine caused by the impaired ability of the carnitine transporter protein to carry the carnitine to where it is needed. Instead the carnitine is excreted through the urine. Fasting or illness can trigger a severe attack.
  • Carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where long-chain fatty acids can't be metabolized properly because the compound needed to transport it is faulty. Ultimately this prevents certain fats (long-chain acylcarnitine) being converted to energy and results in a build up of the fat which is harmful to body organs and tissues.
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Hand or wrist problems; often from repetitive motion.
  • Cerebral Atrophy: Wasting away of the brain.
  • Cerebrovascular accident: Occurs when the blood supply to the brain is interrupted and results in cell injury and death.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disorder: Degeneration of limb muscles.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (generic term): A group of inherited neurological disorders characterized by problems with the peripheral nerves. Muscle weakness, muscle wasting and sensory problems are the most common symptoms. The severity and age of onset of symptoms varies depending on the specific subtype of the disorder.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with pyramidal features, autosomal dominant: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 5 has an autosomal dominant inheritance, progresses slowly and involves movement disorders.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 2: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormalities in the axon of the peripheral nerve cells instead of the myelin sheath coating of the nerves. The condition manifests as muscle weakness and wasting that usually starts in the legs and spreads to the hands and other parts of the body. The severity, age of onset and rate of progression of the condition varies depending on the genetic origin of the defect.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Alanycarb: Alanycarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and nematicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aldicarb: Aldicarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aldoxycarb: Aldoxycarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Allyxycarb: Allyxycarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aluminum: Aluminum is a chemical used mainly for metallurgical purposes and can be found in packaging, electrical parts, vehicles, cooking utensils, construction materials and building components. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aminocarb: Aminocarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonium Bifluoride: Ammonium Bifluoride is a chemical used wheel cleaners, herbicides and in the manufacture of magnesium. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azinphos-methyl: Azinphos-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Baking soda: Baking soda is generally considered non toxic and is used in cooking. However, excessive doses can cause various symptoms.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bendiocarb: Bendiocarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly in . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benfuracarb: Benfuracarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bufencarb: Bufencarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Butacarb: Butacarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Butocarboxim: Butocarboxim is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Butoxcarboxim: Butoxcarboxim is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbanolate: Carbanolate is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbaryl: Carbaryl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbofuran: Carbofuran is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbosulfan: Carbosulfan is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and nematicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cloethocarb: Cloethocarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and nematicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Decarbofuran: Decarbofuran is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dicresyl: Dicresyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimetan: Dimetan is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimetilan: Dimetilan is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dioxacarb: Dioxacarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- EMPC: EMPC is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethiofencarb: Ethiofencarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenethacarb: Fenethacarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenobucarb: Fenobucarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Furathiocarb: Furathiocarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hyquincarb: Hyquincarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Isoprocarb: Isoprocarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methomyl: Methomyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metolcarb: Metolcarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mexacarbate: Mexacarbate is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Monocrotophos: Monocrotophos is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrilacarb: Nitrilacarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Oxamyl: Oxamyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, acaricie and nematicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phenmedipham: Phenmedipham is used as a herbicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pirimicarb: Pirimicarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Promacyl: Promacyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Promecarb: Promecarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Propoxur: Propoxur is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tazimcarb: Tazimcarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thiocarboxime: Thiocarboxime is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thiodicarb: Thiodicarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thiofanox: Thiofanox is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Trimethacarb: Trimethacarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, bird repellent, molluscicide and mamal repellent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- XMC: XMC is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Xylylcarb: Xylylcarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Childhood hypophosphatasia: An inherited bone disorder due to an inborn error of metabolism characterized by a deficiency of alkaline phosphate which results in loss of deciduous teeth before the age of 5 as well as muscle and bone problems - childhood onset.
  • Cholera: An acute bacterial disease transmitted through food or water contaminated with human faeces. The intestinal infection is caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae.
  • Chorea: Any disorder causing involuntary movement or spasms.
  • Chronic Kidney Disease: Long-term and generally irreversible disease of the kidneys due to infection, obstruction, congenital diseases or generalised diseases causing failure of the kidneys' normal functions.
  • Clobazam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Clobazam (an anxiolytic and anticonvulsant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cobra poisoning: The Cobra is a poisonous snake which can be found in Africa, Asia and other parts of the world. Some cobras are able to spit venom into the victims eye and cause serious symptoms.
  • Coconut crab poisoning: The coconut crab is commonly found and eaten as a delicacy in the Indo-Pacific region. These crabs can contain toxic chemicals which can cause severe poisoning in humans if eaten. The toxicity of these crabs is believed to be derived from the ingestion of certain toxic ocean plants. The best way to avoid poisoning is to not eat these crabs at all.
  • Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ10), deficiency: A rare inherited disorder characterized by the deficiency of Coenzyme Q 10. The range and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Coenzyme Q cytochrome c reductase deficiency of: A rare genetic defect where an enzyme deficiency (CoQ-Cytochrome C reductase) disrupts cellular processes. Any of a variety of the components of the enzyme may be missing or defective and hence the clinical presentation and severity may vary. The deficiency may result in a variety of symptoms and conditions of variable severity such as cardiomyopathy, fatal infant conditions and Leber's myopathy.
  • Colchicine poisoning: Ingestion of toxic quantities of colchicines. Colchicine is primarily used as a medicinal theapy for conditions such as gout and familial Mediterranean fever, scleroderma, secondary amyloidosis and pericarditis. The chemical is a natural chemical found in a plant called meadow saffron and ingestion of the plant can also result in poisoning. The plant is found in the northern parts of the world.
  • Compartment Syndrome: Excessive bleeding or swelling following surgery or injury can result in increased pressure within a section of the arms, legs or buttocks. The increased pressure affects blood flow and can result in tissue death necessitating amputation, nerve damage or muscle damage. The condition can be chronic or acute which is a medical emergency.
  • Complex 1 mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency: A rare genetic defect where an enzyme deficiency (NADH CoQ) disrupts cellular processes and causes various organic acid disorders. Any of a variety of the components of the enzyme may be missing or defective and hence the clinical presentation and severity may vary. Presentation may range from infantile death to various disorders such as Leigh's disease, Parkinson's disease and cardiomyopathy.
  • Complex 2 mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency: A rare genetic defect where an enzyme deficiency (succinate CoQ reductase) disrupts cellular processes. The deficiency may result variable symptoms and condition including conditions such as Leigh's syndrome, myopathy and Kearns-Sayre syndrome.
  • Complex 4 mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where the body doesn't have enough of an enzyme called enzyme cytochrome C oxidase (COX or Complex IV) which is needed in the process of energy production by body cells. There are two subtypes: the benign infantile type only affects muscles whereas the fatal infant type affects the hearty and kidneys as well as the muscles.
  • Complex 4 mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency, benign infantile myopathy: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where the body doesn't have enough of an enzyme called enzyme cytochrome C oxidase (COX or Complex IV) which is needed in the process of energy production by body cells. The deficiency generally only affects the muscle tissue
  • Complex 4 mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency, fatal infant myopathy type: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where the body doesn't have enough of an enzyme called enzyme cytochrome C oxidase (COX or Complex IV) which is needed in the process of energy production by body cells. The fatal infant type generally affects the hearty and kidneys as well as the muscles.
  • Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation, Type 1o: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type 1O has a defect in the DPM3 gene which results in decreased activity of an enzyme called dolichol-phosphage-mannose (Dol-P-M).
  • Congenital Muscular Dystrophy: Muscle weakness and wasting that starts at birth or around the time of birth. The severity and extent of muscle involvement is greatly variable.
  • Congenital Myasthenia Gravis: Myasthenia gravis is a chronic neuromuscular disease which usually results from autoimmune dysfunction. Congenital myasthenia gravis however results from a genetic defect. Symptoms tend to become worse during the day with activity and improve after rest or after sleeping. The severity of symptoms may vary.
  • Congenital hypomyelination neuropathy: A rare neurological disorder that is apparent at birth and is characterized by breathing difficulty and muscle problems.
  • Congenital muscular dystrophy syringomyelia: A very rare disorder characterized by muscle weakness and wasting from birth, a severely deformed spine and syringomyelia (cyst in the spinal cord).
  • Congenital myasthenic syndromes: A group of genetic condition characterized by abnormal neuromuscular signals. Symptoms tend to become worse with exertion.
  • Congenital myotonic dystrophy: A form of muscular dystrophy which is usually apparent at birth or within a few years. and affects the skeletal muscles, heart conduction, smooth muscle, eyes and the central nervous system. The range of severity varies from asymptomatic to fetal death.
  • Conn's adenoma: An uncommon (but possible highly underdiagnosed) condition characterized by the excessive production of a hormone called aldosterone by the adrenal gland. The condition may result from the presence of an adrenal adenoma. The severity of the condition is variable with some patients simply suffering high blood pressure and no other symptoms. Due to the high degree of variation in presenting symptoms, the condition may be frequently underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed.
  • Conn's syndrome: An uncommon (but possible highly underdiagnosed) condition characterized by the excessive production of a hormone called aldosterone by the adrenal gland. The condition may result from the presence of an adenoma, carcinoma or enlargement of the adrenal gland or glands. The severity of the condition is variable with some patients simply suffering high blood pressure and no other symptoms. Due to the high degree of variation in presenting symptoms, the condition may be frequently underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed.
  • Conn-Louis Carcinoma: An uncommon (but possible highly underdiagnosed) condition characterized by the excessive production of a hormone called aldosterone by the adrenal gland. The condition results from the presence of an adrenal carcinoma. The severity of the condition is variable with some patients simply suffering high blood pressure and no other symptoms. Due to the high degree of variation in presenting symptoms, the condition may be frequently underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed.
  • Corn Lily poisoning: Corn Lily is a poisonous plant native to the Sierra Nevada mountains. It's appearance is similar to the corn grown as a crop. The plant poison primarily affects the nervous system.
  • Corpus callosum dysgenesis X-linked recessive: Partial or complete lack of development of the structure that divides two sides of the brain (corpus callosum). As the condition is X-linked, it only occurs in males.
  • Cushing syndrome, familial: A hormonal disorder caused by high levels of the cortisol hormone due to the abnormal development of the adrenal gland.
  • Cushing's disease: A condition of hyperadrenocorticism which is secondary to excessive pituitary secretion of ACTH. Cushing's disease is different to Cushing's syndrome which refers to the effects of glucocorticoid excess from any cause.
  • Cushing's syndrome: A rare syndrome where excessive secretion of corticosteroids by the adrenal cortex leads to a variety of symptoms. Hormone-secreting adrenal or pituitary tumors are often the cause of the excessive corticosteroid secretion.
  • Cytoplasmic body myopathy: A rare group of muscle diseases caused by protein deposits inside the muscle cells. The severity, rate of progression and extent of muscle involvement is variable.
  • DOC 12 (Neutral Lipid Storage Type): A rare inherited disorder involving the metabolism of fat which causes skin, muscle and blood abnormalities. The body is unable to metabolize (break down) triglycerides so they build up in various tissues throughout the body. The severity of the symptoms is variable as the body tissues and organs affected varies amongst patients.
  • Decompression sickness: Condition from overly rapid decompression, especially when diving.
  • Decreased serum phosphate: Decreased serum phosphate (or hypophosphatemia) refers to an electrolyte disturbance involving a lower than normal level of phosphate in the blood. This abnormality may in some cases be associated with increased levels of phosphate in the urine but this depends on the underlying cause. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on how low the serum phosphate level is.
  • Dehydration: Loss of fluids in the body
  • Dermatomyositis: A muscle disease characterized by chronic muscle inflammation resulting in progressive muscle weakness and a characteristic rash.
  • Developmental delay -- epilepsy -- neonatal diabetes: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by developmental delay, epilepsy and early-onset diabetes.
  • Developmental delay due to 2-methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • Diabetes: Failing or reduced ability of the body to handle sugars.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Noninsulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 1: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) is a type of diabetes that doesn't respond to insulin but does tend to respond to dietary measures and diabetes medication. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q37.3.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Noninsulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 2: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) is a type of diabetes that doesn't respond to insulin but does tend to respond to dietary measures and diabetes medication. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 12q24.2.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Noninsulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 3: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) is a type of diabetes that doesn't respond to insulin but does tend to respond to dietary measures and diabetes medication. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20q12-q13.1.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Noninsulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 4: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) is a type of diabetes that doesn't respond to insulin but does tend to respond to dietary measures and diabetes medication. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5q34-q35.2.
  • Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Diabetic nerve damage affecting toes, feet, and sometimes hands.
  • Diarrhea chronic with villous atrophy: A very rare metabolic disorder which causes abnormalities in the intestinal lining which results in chronic diarrhea. The reported patients died at 12 years of age and suffered a variety of other problems.
  • Dilutional hyponatremia: Low sodium levels due to excessive fluids.
  • Disorder of Cornification 12 (Neutral Lipid Storage Type): A rare inherited disorder involving the metabolism of fat which causes skin, muscle and blood abnormalities. The body is unable to metabolize (break down) triglycerides so they build up in various tissues throughout the body. The severity of the symptoms is variable as the body tissues and organs affected varies amongst patients.
  • Distal Myopathy 1: An inherited muscle condition that tends to mainly affect the end portions of arms and legs - hands, feet, forearms and lower legs. There are three subtypes which are distinguished by the origin of the genetic defect. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q12. The disease progresses slowly and starts in the ends of the limbs but usually also involves the neck and eventually abdominal muscles.
  • Distal myopathy, Welander type: A very slowly progressing muscle fiber degeneration that starts as mild weakness in the small muscles of hands and feet and may eventually spread to neighboring muscles.
  • Dreyfus syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by flattened vertebrae, kyphoscoliosis, spinal ankylosis, short neck, dwarfism and other abnormalities.
  • Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: An inherited degenerative disease of the muscles which progresses rapidly compared to other muscle wasting diseases.
  • Dystrophia myotonica 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by myotonia, muscle atrophy, cataracts and hypogonadism.
  • Eijkman's syndrome: A group of nervous symptoms that is associated with vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency. The deficiency leads to a condition called Beri-Beri. Severe cases result in progressive paralysis leading to convulsions and death as the nerves become increasingly inflamed and wasted.
  • Electrolyte abnormality: An imbalance in the level of any of a number of chemicals (electrolytes) in the blood stream e.g. chloride, sodium, magnesium, potassium, calcium, phosphate and bicarbonate. Symptoms can vary depending on which electrolyte is involved and the severity of the imbalance - severe cases can readily lead to death. An electrolyte abnormality can be caused by such things excessive loss of body fluid through vomiting or diarrhea, kidney conditions, malabsorption and various drugs such as diuretics and chemotherapy drugs.
  • Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy 1: A rare inherited condition characterized mainly by slowly progressive muscle wasting which tends to start during childhood as well as joint contractures and heart conduction defects. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome Xq28. Because the condition is inherited in a X-linked manner, males tend to be affected but female carriers may have only the potentially fatal heart conduction disorder without any muscle symptoms.
  • Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy 2: A rare inherited condition characterized mainly by slowly progressive muscle wasting which tends to start during childhood as well as joint contractures and heart conduction defects. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q21.2. Because the condition is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner so males and females may be affected.
  • Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy 3: A rare inherited condition characterized mainly by slowly progressive muscle wasting which tends to start during childhood as well as joint contractures. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q21.2. Because the condition is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner so males and females may be affected. Type 3 tends to not have any heart involvement.
  • Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy 4: A rare inherited condition characterized mainly by slowly progressive muscle wasting which tends to start during childhood as well as joint contractures and heart problems. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25. Because the condition is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner so males and females may be affected.
  • Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy 5: A rare inherited condition characterized mainly by slowly progressive muscle wasting which tends to start during childhood as well as joint contractures and heart problems. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q23. Because the condition is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner so males and females may be affected.
  • Emery-Dreifuss Syndrome: A rare inherited condition characterized mainly by slowly progressive muscle wasting which tends to start during childhood as well as joint contractures and heart conduction disorders. In cases with X-linked inheritance, female carriers may have only the potentially fatal heart conduction disorder without any muscle symptoms. The muscle wasting and weakness affects mainly the upper leg muscles.
  • Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, X-linked: A muscle wasting disorder mainly involving the muscles in the arms, legs, face, neck, spine and heart. Symptoms generally only occur in males but female carriers may have some symptoms.
  • Encephalitis: Dangerous infection of the brain
  • Enolase deficiency: Enolase deficiency is a very rare enzyme defect. Enolase is an enzyme involved in carbohydrate metabolism in muscle tissue. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Enolase deficiency type 3: A rare disorder involving a deficiency of beta-enolase enzyme which caused muscle pain and exercise intolerance. Beta-enolase is a muscle specific enzyme.
  • Erb-Goldflam: An inherited disorder characterized by a defect in the transmission of signals to the muscles which results in muscle weakness.
  • Eucalyptus Oil poisoning: Eucalyptus oil can be used for medicinal purposes but excessive ingestion can cause problems. Likewise, eating the leaves of the eucalyptus plant (very unlikely) can also cause poisoning symptoms.
  • Extradural hematoma: Bleeding in the skull outside the brain
  • FOSMN syndrome: A rare neurodegenerative disorder that starts in the face and spreads to the scalp and upper body. The condition progresses slowly.
  • Fabry's Disease: Genetic fat storage disorder
  • Falls: When a person losses balance and falls over
  • Fanconi syndrome: Fanconi syndrome that occurs secondary to the accumulation of crystals of light-chain immunoglobulin molecules in the kidney tubules which affects their functioning.
  • Felodipine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Felodipine (an antihypertensive drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Fitzsimmons-Guilbert syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by paraplegia, short fingers and bone abnormalities. The paraplegia progresses slowly.
  • Fitzsimmons-Walson-Mellor syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by spastic paraplegia, progressive kidney disease and deafness.
  • Floppy infant syndrome: A term used to describe reduced muscle tone and muscle weakness in infants.
  • Flurazepam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Flurazepam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Friedreich ataxia -- congenital glaucoma: A rare disorder characterized by glaucoma at birth and a progressive neuromuscular disorder.
  • Friedreich's ataxia: Progressive muscle weakness from nerve damage.
  • Frisium -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Frisium (an anxiolytic and anticonvulsant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Functioning pancreatic endocrine tumor: Tumors that develop in the pancreas and cause excessive secretion of one or more pancreatic hormones such as insulin, somatostatin, glucagons, gastrin, ACTH (corticosteroids) and vasoactive intestinal peptidase.
  • Furukawa-Takagi-Nakao syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by muscle weakness and wasting, ataxia, diabetes and eye problems.
  • GM1 gangliosidosis: A rare biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (beta-galactosidase A) which results in the accumulation of harmful chemicals (GM1 gangliosides) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Type 1 is a severe infantile form of the disorder and involves a greater degree of accumulation than type II or III.
  • Gangliosidosis generalized GM1, type 1: A rare biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (beta-galactosidase A) which results in the accumulation of harmful chemicals (GM1 gangliosides) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Type 1 is a severe infantile form of the disorder and involves a greater degree of accumulation than type II or III.
  • Generalized Myasthenia Gravis: Myasthenia gravis is a chronic neuromuscular disease resulting from autoimmune dysfunction. In generalized myasthenia gravis weakness develops mainly in the limbs and trunk. The severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Most patients suffer increased severity of symptoms during the day with improvement after sleeping.
  • Giant axonal neuropathy: A rare genetic disorder characterized by incoordination, vision problems and dementia caused by abnormalities of a nerve cell component.
  • Gitelman syndrome: A rare, relatively mild, genetic kidney disorder that causes hypokalemia. The defective gene (NCCT) impairs the function of the Na-Cl cotransporter.
  • Glucocorticoid deficiency, familial: A rare inherited disorder where the adrenals don't respond to ACTH resulting in glucocorticoid deficiency.
  • Glutaric aciduria 2: A metabolic disorder involving an enzyme deficiency - electron transfer flavoprotein ubiquinone oxydoreductase. The severity of symptoms depends on the level of deficiency. The infant onset form is the most severe and often results in death. Severe cases usually develop during childhood or infancy and usually involve metabolic acidosis and its associated symptoms. Milder cases may simply present with muscle weakness initially that develops in adulthood. Some cases may involve additional symptoms such as heart, liver and kidney problems, facial anomalies and genital abnormalities.
  • Gnathostoma hispidum infection: A tapeworm infection with a tapeworm species called Gnathostoma hispidum. The infection is called gnathostomiasis and usually results from eating undercooked contaminated fish or poultry or drinking contaminated water. The nature and severity of symptoms vary depending on which part of the body the tapeworms migrate through (usually the skin).
  • Gnathostoma spinigerum infection: A tapeworm infection with a tapeworm species called Gnathostoma spinigerum. The infection is called gnathostomiasis and usually results from eating undercooked contaminated fish or poultry or drinking contaminated water. The nature and severity of symptoms vary depending on which part of the body the tapeworms migrate through (usually the skin).
  • Guam disease: A nerve degeneration disorder that occurs particularly in Guam and involves progressive dementia and parkinsonism which ultimately leads to death.
  • Guillain-Barre Syndrome: A rare progressive form of ascending polyneuropathy believed to be an autoimmune response.
  • HADH deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • Hashimoto's Thyroiditis: Hashimoto thyroiditis is characterized by the destruction of thyroid cells by various cell- and antibody-mediated immune processes. Patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis have antibodies to various thyroid antigens, the most frequently detected of which include antithyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), antithyroglobulin (anti-Tg), and, to a lesser extent, TSH receptor-blocking antibodies.
  • Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia: A slow-progressing degeneration of the tract that connects the brain to the spinal cord (corticospinal tract) resulting in muscle spasticity, weakness and paralysis. The severity of symptoms is determined by the nature and extent of the damage.
  • Hereditary carnitine deficiency: An inherited deficiency of carnitine resulting primarily in muscle problems. Severe symptoms can be triggered by periods of illness or fasting.
  • Hereditary carnitine deficiency myopathy: An inherited deficiency of carnitine resulting primarily in muscle weakness.
  • Hereditary carnitine deficiency syndrome: An inherited deficiency of carnitine resulting primarily in muscle weakness. The carnitine deficiency may be due to excessive loss of insufficient production.
  • Hereditary carnitine deficiency syndrome, systemic: An inherited deficiency of carnitine in tissues other than the muscles resulting primarily in muscle weakness.
  • Hereditary myopathy with intranuclear filamentous: An inherited muscle disease whose pathology involves abnormal filamentous inclusions in the nucleus of the muscle cells.
  • Hereditary peripheral nervous disorder: A group of inherited disorders affecting the peripheral nerves (nerves other than the brain and spinal cord). The motor, sensory and/or autonomic nerves may be affected. Examples of such conditions includes Dejerine-Sottas disease and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.
  • Hip cancer: The presence of tumour growth in the bone of the hip, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast; cancer affecting bone of hip likely to affect other bones e.g. vertebra, ribs
  • Human Cytochrome Oxidase Deficiency: A condition characterized by a deficiency in cytochrome oxidase enzyme
  • Hyperadrenalism: Excessive levels of adrenal hormones in the body. Symptoms depend on which hormone is involved and the degree of involvement. Adrenal hormones are aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine.
  • Hypercalcemia: Raised level of calcium in the blood
  • Hyperkalaemia: Increased concentration of potassium in the blood.
  • Hyperparathyroidism, primary: A rare genetic disorder where excessive activity of the parathyroid gland causes increased blood calcium levels which can cause various problems.
  • Hypertension due to coarctation of the aorta: Hypertension due to coarctation of the aorta is high blood pressure resulting from a birth defect where a heart blood vessel called the aorta is abnormally narrowed. The high blood pressure tends to affect mainly the upper part of the body. Babies and very young children tend to have more severe symptoms as the degree of narrowing tends to be greater than in older children or adults.
  • Hypoadrenocorticism -- hypoparathyroidism -- moniliasis: An autoimmune disorder where hormone production by various glands is reduced. The main features of the disorder are Addison disease and/or hypoparathyroidism and/or chronic candidiasis.
  • Hypocalcaemia: Decreased concentration of calcium in the blood.
  • Hypokalemia: Low levels of potassium in the body.
  • Hypokalemic periodic paralysis: A rare inherited muscle condition characterized by periods of severe muscle weakness or paralysis which can last from hours to days. Episodes can occur as often as daily or only rarely.
  • Hypomagnesemia primary: Low blood magnesium levels which is caused by the abnormal absorption and excretion of the mineral and can be caused by such things as kidney problems and intestinal malabsorption.
  • Hypoparathyroidism familial isolated: A rare familial condition involving low levels of parathyroid hormone which upsets the body's ability to regulate calcium and phosphate. The severity of symptoms is determined by the how low the parathyroid hormone level is.
  • Hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism: A rare condition where low levels of renin result in insufficient aldosterone being produced.
  • Ichythosiform Erythroderma with Leukocyte Vacuolation: A rare inherited disorder involving the metabolism of fat which causes skin, muscle and blood abnormalities. The body is unable to metabolize (break down) triglycerides so they build up in various tissues throughout the body. The severity of the symptoms is variable as the body tissues and organs affected varies amongst patients.
  • Idiopathic myopathy: A rare condition involving inflammation of the skeletal muscles which become weak and wasted.
  • Inborn amino acid metabolism disorder: A group of inherited disorders where the body is not able to metabolize amino acids consumed in the diet. Amino acids are a part of carbohydrates, fats and proteins and are metabolized in order to provide energy or to make other needed compounds. There are many steps involved in metabolism and the severity can be greatly variable depending on the exact nature of the disorder.
  • Infant botulism food poisoning: Very dangerous food poisoning needing medical attention.
  • Infectious meningitis: Infectious meningitis is meningitis caused by bacterial, viral, or protozoan infection. Most of the agents known to cause meningitis are infectious, but very few people exposed to them will get meningitis. Those at greatest danger include people with AIDS, infants, transplant patients, and others whose immune systems may be compromised.
  • Infective myositis: Inflammation of the skeletal muscles due to any type of infection - bacterial, viral or parasitic.
  • Inhalant abuse: Inhalant abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Inhalants include gasoline, adhesives, solvents, and aerosols. These inhalants can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Inhalant addiction: Inhalant addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse inhalants (e.g. inhaling them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Inhalants are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Inhalants includes glues, shoe polish, household cleaners, room deodorizers and nail polish removers.
  • Intestinal capillariasis: Infection with a type of roundworm (Capillaria phillipinensis) found in the Phillipines and Thailand. Infection can occur by eating raw contaminated freshwater fish.
  • Juberg-Marsidi syndrome: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by severe mental retardation, delayed developmental milestones, muscle problems and growth retardation. The range and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Juvenile Myasthenia Gravis: Myasthenia gravis is a chronic neuromuscular disease which results from autoimmune dysfunction. Juvenile myasthenia gravis also has autoimmune origins and tends to develop during childhood. Symptoms tend to become worse during the day with activity and improve after rest or after sleeping. The severity of symptoms may vary.
  • Juvenile dermatomyositis: A very rare autoimmune disorder where the body's own immune system attacks blood vessels and causes them to become inflamed. The condition is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and a characteristic pinkish-purple rash.
  • Kashin-Bek disease: A disease involving progressive joint degeneration which affects the spine and hands and feet. The condition becomes progressively worse and eventually leads to disability. The condition is most often seen in children who live in the northern parts of China, Siberia and Korea. A possible cause is believed to be eating cereals contaminated with a fungus called Sporotrichella.
  • Kearns-Sayre Syndrome: A rare neuromuscular disorder characterized by pigmented deposits on the retina, heart disease and progressive paralysis of some eye muscles.
  • Kwashiorkor: A malnutrition state that is produced by severe protein deficiency
  • Kyasanur-Forrest disease: A viral hemorrhagic fever that is transmitted to humans through tick bites. It is most prevalent in South Asia.
  • L-3-alpha-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, short chain, deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • LADHSC deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • Lactic acidosis congenital infantile: A rare congenital condition where an infant has high levels of lactic acid in the blood causing metabolic acidosis.
  • Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome: A condition where a patient with a carcinoma suffers from progressive muscular weakness.
  • Lamictal -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lamictal during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lamotrigine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lamotrigine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lead poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to lead.
  • Leukodystrophy: A very rare group of metabolic diseases where chemical anomalies affect the development or maintenance of the protective coating around nerves (myelin sheath). The brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerves may be involved. The range and severity of symptoms is determined by the chemical involved but one of the main symptoms for all the leukodystrophies is a gradual loss of previously acquired mental or physical skills.
  • Limbic encephalitis -- neuromyotonia -- hyperhidrosis -- polyneuropathy: A rare autoimmune disorder involving excessive sweating, dysfunction central nervous system and neuromyotonia. The condition occurs when the body develops antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels.
  • Lipid storage myopathy: A rare condition where the abnormal accumulation of lipids in muscle tissue causes muscle weakness.
  • Lisinopril -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lisinopril during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lithium toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A condition which is characterized by a deficiency in long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase
  • Long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A rare inherited genetic condition where the body is unable to convert certain fats to energy i.e. there is not enough of a certain enzyme (3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) which is needed to metabolize a type of fat called long-chain fatty acids. The build-up of these fatty acids in the body causes damage.
  • Lorazepam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lorazepam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lyme disease: Lyme disease is an emerging infectious disease caused by at least three species of bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia.
  • Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis: Rodent-borne viral disease often causing meningitis or encephalitis
  • Lymphomatous thyroiditis: Progressive thyroid gland enlargement due to autoimmune disease.
  • Lyssavirus: A group of viruses that infect mammals and arthropods
  • M/SCHAD deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • MELAS: A mitochondrial disorder characterized by stroke-like episodes, headaches, vomiting and other neurological symptoms.
  • Macrophagic myofasciitis: A rare form inflammatory muscle disease which is more predominant in adults. A possible cause is believed to be aluminium found in some vaccines.
  • Malabsorption syndrome: is an alteration in the ability of the intestine to absorb nutrients adequately into the bloodstream
  • Malignant hyperthermia: A very rare genetic disorder where sufferers suffer episodes of adverse reactions when certain anesthetics or muscle relaxants are administered.
  • Marasmus: A form of malnutrition caused by a severe deficiency of both protein and calories
  • Marinesco-Sjogren syndrome: A group of recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by incoordination due to a brain anomaly.
  • Marinesco-Sjogren-like syndrome (MSLS): A very rare disorder characterized by cataracts (during childhood), mental retardation, muscle weakness and brain degeneration. The disorder is very similar to another syndrome called Marinesco-Sjogren syndrome.
  • Mc Leod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by neuromuscular, blood and central nervous system symptoms. The disease is slowly progressive.
  • Medium and long chan 3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A metabolic disorder characterized by the deficiency of an enzyme (3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) which is needed to metabolise long and medum-chain fatty acids. The severity of symptoms may vary depending on the degree of the deficiency.
  • Medium and short chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • Medulloblastoma: A type of brain tumor.
  • Mesothelioma, adult malignant: A rare type of malignant cancer that occurs in the pleura (chest lining) or peritoneum (abdominal lining). The cancer develops in people who have inhaled asbestos fibres. Symptoms tend to occur many years or even decades after the exposure.
  • Mesothelioma, adult malignant -- pleural: A rare type of malignant cancer that occurs in the pleura (chest lining). The cancer develops in people who have inhaled asbestos fibers. Symptoms tend to occur many years or even decades after the exposure.
  • Metabolic disorders: Disorders that affect the metabolic system in human
  • Metachromatic Leukodystrophy: An inherited biochemical deficiency involving a deficiency of the enzyme called arylsulfatase A which leads to a harmful buildup of fatty material in the body.
  • Methamphetamine overdose: Methamphetamine is a prescription drug mainly used to treat ADHD . Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Minamata disease: Ingestion of seafood containing methylmercury can result in neurological toxicity symptoms.
  • Minicore disease: A rare congenital muscle disorder involving muscle weakness and wasting. The term minicore comes from the small core structures that occur in the muscle tissue. There are four subgroups of the disorder: classic form (rigid spine syndrome), progressive form with hand involvement, antenatal form with arthrogryposis multiplex congenital and the ophthalmoplegic form. The rate of progression and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Minicore myopathy with external ophthalmoplegia: A rare congenital muscle disorder involving muscle weakness and wasting. The term minicore comes from the small core structures that occur in the muscle tissue. There are four subgroups of the disorder: classic form (rigid spine syndrome), progressive form with hand involvement, antenatal form with arthrogryposis multiplex congenital and the ophthalmoplegic form. The ophthalmoplegic form is distinguished by the presence of eye muscle weakness. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Minicore myopathy, antenatal onset, with arthrogryposis: A rare congenital muscle disorder involving muscle weakness and wasting. The term minicore comes from the small core structures that occur in the muscle tissue. There are four subgroups of the disorder: classic form (rigid spine syndrome), progressive form with hand involvement, antenatal form with arthrogryposis multiplex congenital and the ophthalmoplegic form. The antenatal form with arthrogryposis is distinguished by the presence of contractures at birth due to reduced fetal movement as well as various physical anomalies. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Minicore myopathy, moderate, with hand involvement: A rare congenital muscle disorder involving muscle weakness and wasting. The term minicore comes from the small core structures that occur in the muscle tissue. There are four subgroups of the disorder: classic form (rigid spine syndrome), progressive form with hand involvement, antenatal form with arthrogryposis multiplex congenital and the ophthalmoplegic form. The progressive form with hand involvement is less severe than the classic form with breathing problems and scoliosis usually absent or mild. It is distinguished by the presence of hyperlaxity. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome: A group of conditions called mitochondrial disorders involving a reduced number of mitochondrial DNA in tissues rather than defective mitochondrial DNA. The disorders generally involve neurological symptoms which can occur during infancy or childhood. Symptoms will vary depending on the specific order involved.
  • Mitochondrial diseases: Any of a group of mitochondrial disorders affecting cell metabolism and especially muscles.
  • Mitochondrial myopathy -- lactic acidosis: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle disease and a metabolic disorder. The severity and progression of the disease is variable with some dying early in their second decade and others living longer.
  • Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency: A rare genetic condition where the body is unable to convert certain fats to energy. More specifically, there is insufficient levels of a particular enzyme needed to metabolize a type of fat called long-chain fatty acids.
  • Motor neuropathy: A rare disorder involving progressive muscle weakness. The rate of progression, severity and age of onset is variable.
  • Multicore disease: A nonprogressive congenital muscle disease which mainly involves weakness of the proximal muscles. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Multifocal motor neuropathy: Disorder of progressive muscle weakness.
  • Multifocal motor neuropathy with conduction block: A very rare disorder involving progressive destruction of the protective sheath around nerves. Usually arms are affected first and occasionally the legs are involved. It is believed to be an immune mediated disorder.
  • Multiminicore disease (MmD): A rare congenital muscle disorder involving weakness and wasting of skeletal muscles. The term minicore comes from the small core structures that occur in the muscle tissue. There are four subgroups of the disorder: classic form (rigid spine syndrome), progressive form with hand involvement, antenatal form with arthrogryposis multiplex congenital and the ophthalmoplegic form. The rate of progression and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Multiple Myeloma: A rare malignant cancer that occurs in the bone marrow. More common in skull, spine, rib cage, pelvis and legs.
  • Multiple Sclerosis: Autoimmune attack on spinal nerves causing diverse and varying neural problems.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 1: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 2: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10p15.1.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 3: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5p13.2.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 4: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1p36.
  • Muscle conditions: Any condition that affects the muscles of the body
  • Muscle weakness: A condition which is characterized by an inability of the muscles to function at their full strenght
  • Muscular dystrophy -- congenital infantile cataract -- hypogonadism: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle wasting, infantile cataracts and hypogonadism.
  • Muscular dystrophy congenital, merosin negative: A rare group of diseases characterized mainly by reduced muscle tone and muscle weakness in the arms, legs and trunk. Symptoms start at birth or soon after.
  • Muscular dystrophy limb-girdle (generic term): A group of disorders characterized by muscle weakness and wasting involving mainly the voluntary muscles around the hips and shoulders i.e. the limb-girdle muscles. The terms proximal and distal may be used and this refers to muscles closest to the center of the body and furthest from the centre of the body respectively. The condition may start at any age and the rate of progression and severity of symptoms varies depending on the subtype. Generally, early onset forms tend to be more severe and progress faster than late onset forms.
  • Muscular dystrophy, Duchenne and Becker type: An inherited l disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness. The disorder is caused by a genetic anomaly and results in insufficient quantities of or ineffective dystrophin which is needed for normal muscle functioning. The disorder is expressed in males but females can be carriers.
  • Muscular dystrophy, congenital, infantile with cataract -- hypogonadism: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle wasting, infantile cataracts and hypogonadism.
  • Muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle, autosomal dominant: A rare inherited condition characterized mainly by progressive wasting and weakness of muscles in the shoulder and pelvic girdle (around the top of the arms and legs). Heart and breathing complications may also occur in some cases.
  • Muscular phosphorylase kinase deficiency: A very rare genetic defect which affects muscles and causes rapid fatigue on exertion and muscle cramping and weakness.
  • Myasthenia Gravis: An autoimmune disorder which interferes with nerve impulses to muscles and hence results in weak, easily fatigued muscles.
  • Myasthenia Gravis with Thymus Hyperplasia: Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune neuromuscular disease which is often associated with an abnormal thymus. The relationship between the thymus and myasthenia is not fully understood but as the thymus is involved in the body's immune system, it may trigger the immune system abnormality underlying some cases of myasthenia gravis.
  • Myasthenia, Congenital, Refractory to Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: A neuromuscular disease that is present from birth and is characterized by the inability to manage the condition by administering acetylcholinesterase inhibitors which is used to treat other myasthenias. This form of myasthenia results from a genetic defect whereas other forms of myasthenia generally result from an autoimmune process.
  • Myasthenia, Familial Infantile, 1: Illness, stress or fatigue may result in sudden severe episodes of apnea which can be fatal.
  • Myasthenia, Limb-Girdle, with Tubular Aggregates: A neuromuscular disease affecting the limb-girdle muscles primarily. The condition is distinguished by the presence of abnormal tubular aggregates in the muscle tissue and the absence of weakness in the eye and eyelid muscles which is a usually a symptom of myasthenia gravis.
  • Myasthenia, familial: A familial form of myasthenia which is a muscle disease characterized by muscle weakness. The weakness is exacerbated by physical activity and improved by resting.
  • Myasthenia, familial limb-girdle: A rare genetic condition characterized by weakness of the chest and pelvic girdle muscles.
  • Myasthenic syndrome, congenital, slow-channel: A rare disorder involving progressive muscle wasting and weakness of variable severity depending on the exact origin of the genetic defect. The problem arises from defective processes at the junction of nerve and muscle cells.
  • Myelinopathies: Disorders where the protective myelin sheath around nerves is destroyed which affects the transmission of nerve signals. The severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of myelin destruction and the nerves affected. Multiple sclerosis is an example of a myelin sheath disease.
  • Myopathy: General name for any disease of the muscles.
  • Myopathy -- ophthalmoplegia -- hypoacousia -- areflexia: A rare disorder characterized mainly by muscle weakness, paralysis of eye muscles, lack of reflexes and partial hearing loss.
  • Myopathy and diabetes mellitus: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle disease and diabetes mellitus. The condition was highly variable with respect to the severity, range and onset of symptoms.
  • Myopathy congenital multicore with external ophthalmoplegia: A rare disorder characterized by muscle weakness and as well as weakness or paralysis of the external eye muscles. Severity of symptoms are variable.
  • Myopathy mitochondrial -- cataract: A rare disorder characterized by muscle weakness and cataracts.
  • Myopathy with lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia: A rare disorder of the bone marrow and skeletal muscles which manifests as muscle disease and anemia. Progressive intolerance to exercise usually starts during childhood with anemia occurring around adolescence.
  • Myopathy, Congenital, Batten Turner Type: An extremely rare, benign form of congenital muscular dystrophy involving relatively minor muscle wasting. The condition progresses slowly until adulthood.
  • Myopathy, Myosin storage: A rare form of genetic muscle disease which progresses slowly and causes generalized muscle weakness and wasting. The condition results from the abnormal presence of hyaline bodies in type 1 muscle fibres.
  • Myopathy, early-onset with fatal cardiomyopathy: A rare disorder involving muscle disease and early onset heart disease which leads to death.
  • Myopathy, hyaline body, autosomal dominant: A rare form of genetic muscle disease which progresses slowly and causes generalized muscle weakness and wasting. The condition results from the abnormal presence of hyaline bodies in type 1 muscle fibres.
  • Myopathy, myotubular: A group of rare inherited disorders characterized by muscle wasting. There are three forms of the condition ranging from relatively mild to severe resulting in extreme weakness of breathing muscles.
  • Myositis ossificans: A very rare progressive disorder involving calcification of muscles, tendons and ligaments.
  • N-acetyl-alpha-D-galactosaminidase: A very rare enzyme deficiency (N-acetyl-alpha-D-galactosaminidase) which can occur in three forms: type I (infantile-onset neuroaxonal dystrophy), type II or Kanzaki disease (adult-onset) and type III (mild or moderate form).
  • NADH CoQ reductase, deficiency of: A rare genetic defect where an enzyme deficiency (NADH CoQ) disrupts cellular processes and causes various organic acid disorders. Any of a variety of the components of the enzyme may be missing or defective and hence the clinical presentation and severity may vary. Presentation may range from infantile death to various disorders neurodegenerative disorders such as Leigh's disease, Parkinson's disease and cardiomyopathy.
  • Nasopharyngitis: Nasopharyngitis is a contagious, viral infectious disease of the upper respiratory system, primarily.It is the most common infectious disease in humans
  • Navajo neurohepatopathy: A rare genetic disease found in Navajo populations. It involves peripheral nerve degeneration, liver disease and corneal ulcers. The genetic disease is believed to be caused by maternal exposure to uranium from waters contaminated by old mines.
  • Nelson Syndrome: The rapid growth of a pituitary adenoma (tumor) after the surgical removal of both adrenal glands to treat Cushing's disease. The condition is triggered by the resultant loss of the regulatory function of cortisol.
  • Nerve compression: Compression of a nerve that becomes trapped in a confined space due to any cause e.g. trauma, inflammation or a disease process. This usually occurs near joints. The resulting pressure on the nerve can be very painful and if left untreated can result in damage to the nerve and eventually muscle weakness and wasting. Conditions such as bone spurs, joint swelling due to injury, cysts and trauma can result in nerve entrapment. The exact symptoms will depend on which nerve is trapped and the duration and severity of the entrapment.
  • Nerve conditions: Any condition that affects the nerves
  • Nerve entrapment: Compression of a nerve that becomes trapped in a confined space due to any cause e.g. trauma, inflammation or a disease process. This usually occurs near joints. The resulting pressure on the nerve can be very painful and if left untreated can result in damage to the nerve and eventually muscle weakness and wasting. Conditions such as bone spurs, joint swelling due to injury, cysts and trauma can result in nerve entrapment. The exact symptoms will depend on which nerve is trapped and the duration and severity of the entrapment.
  • Neuroacanthocytosis: An autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by tics, chorea, and personality changes
  • Neuroaxonal dystrophy, infantile: An inherited disorder involving progressive muscular and coordination problems, impaired brain function and speech and vision impairment.
  • Neuromyelitis Optica: A demyelinating disorder associated with transverse myelopathy and optic neuritis
  • Neuropathy: Peripheral neuropathy is the term for damage to nerves of the peripheral nervous system, which may be caused either by diseases of the nerve or from the side-effects of systemic illness.
  • Neuropathy -- ataxia -- retinitis pigmentosa: A rare inherited disorder where defects in the energy producing part of cells affects the nervous system and causes symptoms such as muscle and vision problems. Severity and rang of symptoms are variable.
  • Neuropathy ataxia and retinis pigmentosa: A rare inherited disorder where defects in the energy producing part of cells affects the nervous system and causes symptoms such as muscle and vision problems. Severity and rang of symptoms are variable.
  • Neuropathy, hereditary motor and sensory, LOM type: A severe form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease which involves the loss of the protective covering around nerves resulting in various nerve problems. Muscle weakness and wasting and sensory loss is more severe in the ends of the arms and legs.
  • Neurosyphilis -- general paresis: A complication of untreated syphilis where the infection invades the brain cells and causes a range of neurological symptoms. The condition is progressive and life-threatening.
  • Neurosyphilis -- tabes dorsalis: A complication of untreated syphilis where the infection invades the spinal cord and progressively impairs muscle function and nerve damage may also occur. This form of the condition is progressive and life-threatening.
  • Olivopontocerebellar Atrophy: A group of diseases progressive degeneration occurs in a particular area of the brain (olivopontocerebellar area) which results in various neurological symptoms.
  • Olivopontocerebellar atrophy type 3: A disorder where degeneration of certain parts of the brain and spinal cord results in symptoms such as blindness, tremor, speech problems and ataxia.
  • Oncogenic osteomalacia: A rare type of cancer (mesenchymal) that results in osteomalacia or rickets. Osteomalacia and rickets normally occurs as a consequence of a diet deprived of vitamin D. The tumor can occur in bone or soft tissue. The removal of the tumor alleviates the osteomalacia.
  • Osteomalacia: A condition where the bones gradually soften and bend due to poor calcification stemming from a lack or impaired metabolism of vitamin D.
  • Paraplegia -- brachydactyly -- cone-shaped epiphysis: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by paraplegia, short fingers and bone abnormalities. The paraplegia progresses slowly.
  • Parsonage Turner syndrome: Inflammation of the nerves that carry signals from the spine to the shoulder, arm and hands.
  • Passos-Bueno syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by mental retardation, reduced muscle tone, incontinence, muscle wasting and inability to walk or speak.
  • Pelvic dysplasia arthrogryposis of lower limbs: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by pelvic anomalies and joint contractures involving the legs.
  • Percocet overdose: Percocet is a prescription drug used to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Peripheral neuropathy: Peripheral neuropathy is the term for damage to nerves of the peripheral nervous system, which may be caused either by diseases of the nerve or from the side-effects of systemic illness.
  • Pituitary cancer, childhood: Cancer (malignant) of the pituitary gland in children. The pituitary gland produces various hormones and some pituitary tumors (functioning tumors) can affect the secretion of one or more of these hormones resulting in a range of symptoms depending on the exact location of the tumor. Some pituitary tumors do not affect hormone production (nonfunctioning tumors).
  • Pituitary tumors, adult: A benign or cancer tumor that develops in the tissue of the pituitary gland in adults. The pituitary gland produces various hormones and some pituitary tumors (functioning tumors) can affect the secretion of one or more of these hormones resulting in a range of symptoms depending on the exact location of the tumor. Some pituitary tumors do not affect hormone production (nonfunctioning tumors).
  • Plant poisoning -- Aesculin: Aesculin is a toxin found in horse chestnuts, California buckeye and in the resin from Daphne mezereum. The toxin causes gastrointestinal symptoms and neurological symptoms.
  • Plant poisoning -- Amygdalin: Amygdalin is a chemical found naturally in various plants e.g. stone fruit kernels and raw almonds. Eating these parts of the plant that contain the chemical can cause symptoms of cyanide poisoning as the amygdalin is converted to cyanide by the digestive process. Obviously, the concentration of the chemical varies amongst species of plant and often, significant quantities are needed to produce symptoms. Nevertheless, severe poisoning can result in death. Amygdalin is believed by some to inhibit cancers but there has been no conclusive proof of this.
  • Plant poisoning -- Cyanogenic glycoside: Cyanogenic glycoside is a toxin found naturally in various plants e.g. cherries, plums, almonds, peaches, apricots, apples and cassava. The chemical is usually concentrated in the seeds, kernels or wilted leaves. Eating these parts of the plant that contain the chemical can cause symptoms of cyanide poisoning as the cyanogenic glycoside is converted to cyanide by the digestive process. Even chewing the leaves can result in conversion to cyanide due to the presence of digestive enzymes in the mouth. Obviously, the concentration of the chemical varies amongst species of plant and often, significant quantities are needed to produce symptoms. Nevertheless, severe poisoning can result in death.
  • Plant poisoning -- Indian tobacco (Lobelia inflata): Ingestion of parts of the Indian tobacco plant may cause various symptoms and severe cases may result in a coma.
  • Plant poisoning -- Poison hemlock (Conium maculatum): Ingestion of parts of the Poison hemlock plant may cause various symptoms and severe cases may result in a coma.
  • Plant poisoning -- Saponin: Saponin is a toxin found naturally in plants such as the Christmas rose and carnations. It gives plants a bitter taste which makes poisoning relatively uncommon.
  • Plant poisoning -- tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum): Ingestion of parts of the tobacco plant may cause various symptoms and severe cases may result in a coma.
  • Plendil -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Plendil (an antihypertensive drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Poikilodermatomyositis -- mental retardation: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation , muscle inflammation and weakness and pigmentation abnormalities.
  • Polio: Dangerous virus now rare due to vaccination.
  • Polymyalgia rheumatica: A condition characterized by muscle pain and stiffness, fatigue and fever. It is often associated with giant-cell arteritis which is a related but more serious condition.
  • Polyneuropathy -- hand defect: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by flexion deformity of the thumb and some fingers as well as sensory disturbance in the arms.
  • Polyneuropathy -- mental retardation -- acromicria -- premature menopause: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by premature menopause, sensory impairment, mental retardation and small, delicate facial bones.
  • Pontocerebellar hypoplasia with infantile spinal muscular atrophy: A rare, recessively inherited disorder characterized by an abnormally small brain and brainstem which manifests as a small head and mental retardation. The disorder is lethal with death usually occurring within the first year. The brain progressively degenerates.
  • Porphyria: A group of disorders characterized by excess production of porphyrin or its precursors which affects the skin and/or nervous system.
  • Porphyria, Ala-D: A very rare inherited disorder where involving a lack of the enzyme delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Oxazepam: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Oxazepam (a pharmaceutical drug) has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Posterior column ataxia with retinitis pigmentosa: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by progressive ataxia and eye degeneration resulting in blindness by the third decade as well as muscle problems.
  • Potassium deficiency: A deficiency of potassium in the body
  • Potassium toxicity: Excessive consumption of potassium can cause symptoms of toxicity.
  • Prednisolone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Prednisolone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Primary Aldosteronism: Primary aldosteronism is a condition which the body's adrenal glands produce too much of the hormone aldosterone, causing retention sodium and loss of potassium.
  • Primary Hyperaldosteronism: A condition characterised by the excessive production and release into the circulation of aldosterone
  • Progressive External Opthhalmoplegia, Autosomal Dominant: A slow progressive paralysis of the motor nerves of the eye (external eye muscles). The condition is often abbreviated to PEO which can include the eye muscles. PEO is usually caused by mitochondrial diseases such as mitochondrial myopathy. Muscles are the most frequently affected organs in mitochondrial disease. There are a number of subtypes each originating from a different genetic mutations and involving variations in the manifestations.
  • Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy: Progressive degenerative condition of the brain.
  • Progressive external ophthalmoplegia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by progressive paralysis of the eye muscles as well as occasional skeletal muscle involvement.
  • Protein deficiency:
  • Proximal spinal muscular atrophy, Adult, autosomal recessive: A rare, progressive neuro-muscular disease that occurs in adults. Nerve cells in the spinal cord are impaired resulting in loss of voluntary muscle control in various parts of the body. The lack of use of the muscle results in atrophy or weakness. Progression and prognosis is difficult to determine as individuals are affected to varying degrees.
  • Proximal spinal muscular atrophy, type 1: A type of spinal muscular atrophy which is a progressive genetic motor neuron disease involving the nerves and muscles. The condition is relatively rare and is characterized by muscle weakness which leads to structural deformities and loss or reduced capability of normal body movements. SMA type I is the most debilitating form as muscular weakness is evident at birth and diagnosis usually occurs within the first three months.
  • Proximal spinal muscular atrophy, type 4: A rare, progressive neuro-muscular disease that occurs in adults. Nerve cells in the spinal cord are impaired resulting in loss of voluntary muscle control in various parts of the body. The lack of use of the muscle results in atrophy or weakness. Progression and prognosis is difficult to determine as individuals are affected to varying degrees.
  • Proximal spinal muscular atrophy, type IV: A rare, progressive neuro-muscular disease that occurs in adults. Nerve cells in the spinal cord are impaired resulting in loss of voluntary muscle control in various parts of the body. The lack of use of the muscle results in atrophy or weakness. Progression and prognosis is difficult to determine as individuals are affected to varying degrees.
  • Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) deficiency: A condition which is characterized by a deficiency of purine nucleoside phosphorylate
  • Pyridoxine deficiency: Deficiency of vitamin B6 which has many uses in the body.
  • Pyruvate carboxylase deficiency, Group A: A rare inherited disorder characterized by a deficiency of pyruvate carboxylase which leads to accumulation of lactic acid and other compounds which can have a toxic effect on the nervous system and body organs. Type A has moderately severe symptoms that usually start during infancy.
  • Ray-Peterson-Scott syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by pelvic anomalies and joint contractures involving the legs.
  • Red buckeye poisoning: The red buckeye is a shrubby plant which bears a cluster of small red flowers and brown seeds with distinctive pale markings. The plant originated in the US. The seeds and leaves contain various chemicals (glycoside aesculin, saponin aescin and alkaloids) which can cause poisoning symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered very toxic and death can result in cases of severe poisoning.
  • Renal tubular acidosis, distal, autosomal dominant: A rare kidney disorder characterized mainly by increased urine alkalinity and high blood acidity due to abnormal kidney functioning.
  • Repetitive Motion Disorders: Any of various injuries caused by repetitive motion.
  • Repetitive Strain Injury: Various conditions with inflammation from repetitive movements.
  • Resistance to thyroid stimulating hormone: A very rare disorder where the body is unable to respond to thyroid stimulating hormone even though it is present in sufficient quantities. The problem lies in defective thyroid stimulating hormone receptors.
  • Rhabdomyolysis: Skeletal muscle injury or death, which releases muscle fibres into the blood.
  • Rib Tumor: The presence of tumour growth in the ribs, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary bony metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast.
  • Riedel syndrome: A rare condition that occurs when fibrous tissue forms in the thyroid area and progressively destroys the thyroid gland.
  • SBCAD deficiency: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • SCHAD Deficiency -- formerly: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • Sandhoff Disease: An inherited biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of the enzyme called hexosaminidase A&B which results in the harmful accumulation of chemicals in the central nervous system and other body tissues.
  • Schilder's Disease: Rare nerve myelin condition.
  • Schindler disease: Schindler disease is a rare congenital metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of a particular enzyme (alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase) which results in a buildup of glycoproteins in the body. The condition originates from a genetic mutation and is an inherited disorder. There are three main types of this condition, each with varying severity. The most severe form usually results in death within a few years of birth whereas the mild form doesn't cause symptoms until after the age of 30. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on which form of the disease is involved.
  • Schindler disease, type 1: Schindler disease is a rare congenital metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of a particular enzyme (alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase) which results in a buildup of glycoproteins in the body. The condition originates from a genetic mutation and is an inherited disorder. There are three main types of this condition, each with varying severity. Type 1 is an infantile form and is the most severe form. It usually results in death within a few years of birth.
  • Scleroatonic muscular dystrophy: An inherited disorder affecting muscles and resulting in muscle weakness and wasting that starts from birth. The joints closest to the body tend to have limited movement whereas those in the hands and feet tend to be hyperextensible.
  • Scleromyxedema: A rare connective tissue disorder which causes the skin to become progressively thick and hard. The severity of symptoms is variable with lungs and circulation affected in some patients. The degree of resulting disability, disfigurement and response to treatment is variable.
  • Secondary hyperparathyroidism: A condition which is characterized by the occurrence of hyperparathyroidism due to a secondary condition affects the thyroid
  • Sensory ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoparesis: A very rare syndrome characterized by progressive ataxia, eye muscle problems and a speech disorder (dysarthria).
  • Simvastatin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Simvastatin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Singleton-Merten Syndrome: A very rare disorder involving calcium abnormalities which affect the teeth, bones and blood vessels.
  • Sleep paralysis: The occurrence of paralysis during ones sleep
  • Slocumb syndrome: Symptoms caused by long-term treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with corticoid steroids. Symptoms often improve after a short sleep.
  • Small syndrome: A rare genetic disease characterized by deafness, muscle weakness and wasting, mental retardation and eye disorders.
  • Solvent abuse: Solvent abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Solvents include nail polish removers, paint thinners, gasoline, typing correction fluid and toxic markers. These solvents can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Solvent addiction: Solvent addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse solvents (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Solvents are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Solvents includes paint thinner, toxic markers, gasoline, cigarette lighter fluid, typing correction fluid and nail polish removers.
  • Southwestern Athabaskan genetic diseases: A group of four genetic diseases that are unique to the Navajo and Apache (Southwestern Athabaskan) populations. The disease are Athabaskan severe combined immunodeficiency, Navajo neurohepatopathy, Navajo poikiloderma and Athabaskan brainstem dysgenesis.
  • Spastic Paraplegia 42, Autosomal Dominant: A rare disorder characterized mainly by muscle wasting and weakness in the legs.
  • Spastic paraplegia nephritis deafness: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by spastic paraplegia, progressive kidney disease and deafness.
  • Sphingolipidosis: A group of diseases involving the abnormal metabolism and storage of a substance called sphingolipid. Symptoms will vary depending on the disease. Examples of diseases from this group include gangliosidosis, Gaucher's disease and Niemann-Pick disease.
  • Spina bifida: A birth defect where the spinal vertebrae do not completely enclose the spinal cord often resulting in various degrees of nerve damage.
  • Spinal Muscular Atrophy: A rare condition characterized by progressive degeneration of the spinal and brainstem motor neurons. During fetal development excess primary neurons are formed. The body automatically destroys the extra primary neurons so that only some survive and mature into neurons. In spinal muscular dystrophy, the process that destroys the excess primary neurons doesn't switch off and continues destroying the neurons resulting in progressive motor problems. Various types of the condition range from mild to severe enough to cause death within a couple of years of birth.
  • Spinal Muscular Atrophy type I: Type of SMA, a genetic motor neuron disease affecting nerves and muscles.
  • Spinal bulbar motor neuropathy: A rare inherited disease that affects the nerves in the spine and in the bulbous (bulbar) part of the brain stem. The main signs are muscle weakness and wasting.
  • Spinal muscular atrophy, Adult form: A rare, progressive neuro-muscular disease that occurs in adults. Nerve cells in the spinal cord are impaired resulting in loss of voluntary muscle control in various parts of the body. The lack of use of the muscle results in atrophy or weakness. Progression and prognosis is difficult to determine as individuals are affected to varying degrees.
  • Spinal muscular atrophy, type 3: A rare inherited disorder where motor neuron degeneration causes progressive muscle weakness and atrophy.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia -- amyotrophy -- deafness: A very rare syndrome characterized by muscle weakness and wasting, ataxia and deafness.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 3: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 14q32.1defect) characterized by . Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types. The duration of the disease is 1-20 years.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy, type 2: A neurological disorder characterized by progressive ataxia, tremor and muscle weakness and wasting. The rate of progression and severity is variable with some needing wheelchairs in their second decade and others still capable of some walking in their 4th decade.
  • Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, congenita: A rare genetic bone growth disorder characterized by prenatal growth deficiency, myopia and short trunk.
  • Spondylosis: Spinal degeneration of the discs or spinal joints
  • Sprains and strains: A joint injury in which some of the supporting tissues are damaged
  • Strain: Muscle or tendon injury; compare sprain
  • Subarachnoid haemorrhage: A condition which is characterized by haemorrhage of blood into the subarachnoid space
  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage: Brain bleeding in the subarachnoid area
  • Subdural hematoma: Type of bleeding in the brain
  • Sydenham chorea: Brain disease causing involuntary movements or spasms.
  • Syringomyelia: Spinal cord cysts
  • Tacrolimus -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Tacrolimus during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Thalidomide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Thalidomide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • The Congenital Lactic Acidoses: A condition which is characterized by congenital lactic acidoses
  • Thymic epithelial tumor: A tumor that develops in the outer layers (epithelial) layers of the thymus. The tumor may be malignant or benign. The thymus produces white blood cells.
  • Thymus Cancer: Cancer that occurs in the thymus
  • Thymus disorders: Any disorder that affects the thymus
  • Tick paralysis: Paralysis from Australian tick bites
  • Toluene sniffing syndrome: Symptoms caused by sniffing vapor containing a chemical called toluene.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Amiodarone: Use of a cardiovascular drug called Amiodarone may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Amiodarone tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Amitriptyline: Use of drug called Amitriptyline may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Amitriptyline tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Amphotericin: Use of drug called Amphotericin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Amphotericin tends to primarily affect muscle movement (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Carbutamide: Use of drug called Carbutamide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Carbutamide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Chlorambucil: Use of a cancer drug called Chlorambucil may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Chlorambucil tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Chloroquine: Use of an antirheumatic drug called Chloroquine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Chloroquine tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Chlorpropamide: Use of drug called Chlorpropamide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Chlorpropamide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Clioquinol: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Clioquinol may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Clioquinol tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Clofibrate: Use of a cardiovascular drug called Clofibrate may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Clofibrate tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Colchicine: Use of an antirheumatic drug called Colchicine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Colchicine tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Disopyramide: Use of a cardiovascular drug called Disopyramide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Disopyramide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Disulfiram: Use of drug called Disulfiram may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Disulfiram tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Ethambutol: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Ethambutol may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Ethambutol tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Ethoglucid: Use of a drug called Ethoglucid may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Ethoglucid tends to cause mainly localized neuropathy.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Glutethimide: Use of drug called Glutethimide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Glutethimide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Gold: Therapeutic use of gold to treat rheumatism may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). The nerve toxicity of the substance may vary amongst people - tolerance level to the drug varies amongst people. Gold tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Hydralazine: Use of a blood pressure drug called Hydralazine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Indomethacin: Use of an antirheumatic drug called Indomethacin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Indomethacin tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Isoniazid: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Isoniazid may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Isoniazid tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy). B6 supplements may help prevent the neuropathy.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Methaqualone: Use of drug called Methaqualone may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Methaqualone tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Methimazole: Use of drug called Methimazole may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Methimazole tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Metronidazole: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Metronidazole may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Metronidazole tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Mustine: Use of a drug called mustine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Mustine tends to mainly cause localized neuropathy.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Nitrofurantoin: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Nitrofurantoin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Nitrofurantoin tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Perhexiline: Use of a cardiovascular drug called Perhexiline may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Perhexiline tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Phenylbutazone: Use of an antirheumatic drug called Phenylbutazone may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Phenylbutazone tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Phenytoin: Use of drug called Phenytoin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Phenytoin tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Podophyllum: Use of a cancer drug called Podophyllum may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Podophyllum tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Streptomycin: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Streptomycin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Streptomycin tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Sulphonamide: Use of Sulphonamide drugs may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sulphonamide tends to primarily affect muscle movement (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Thalidomide: Use of drug called Thalidomide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Thalidomide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Tolbutamide: Use of drug called Tolbutamide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Tolbutamide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Vincristine: Use of a cancer drug called Vincristine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Vincristine tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Transient ischaemic attack:
  • Transverse myelitis: Inflammation of the spinal cord which results in various neurological and muscle symptoms. The inflammation can occur for no obvious reason or may result from a virus, bacterial infection, autoimmune disease or vaccination. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and degree of inflammation.
  • Triazolam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Triazolam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Trichinosis: Worm infection usually caught from pigs
  • Triglyceride storage disease with impaired long-chain fatty acid oxidation: A rare inherited disorder involving the metabolism of fat which causes skin, muscle and blood abnormalities.
  • Type 2 diabetes: Most common diabetes in adults, usually progressing slowly, mostly treated without insulin at diagnosis.
  • Vacuolar myopathy: A term used to describe a group of conditions involving degeneration of the spinal cord. It is most often seen in AIDS patients but also occurs in conditions such as inherited muscle diseases and other neuromuscular conditions.
  • Valium -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Valium during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.

 

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