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Diseases » Myasthenia Gravis » Summary
 

What is Myasthenia Gravis?

What is Myasthenia Gravis?

  • Myasthenia Gravis: An autoimmune disorder which interferes with nerve impulses to muscles and hence results in weak, easily fatigued muscles.
  • Myasthenia Gravis: disease characterized by progressive weakness and exhaustibility of voluntary muscles without atrophy or sensory disturbance and caused by an autoimmune attack on acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction.
    Source - Diseases Database
  • Myasthenia Gravis: a chronic progressive disease characterized by chronic fatigue and muscular weakness (especially in the face and neck); caused by a deficiency of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junctions.
    Source - WordNet 2.1

Ophanet, a consortium of European partners, currently defines a condition rare when it affects 1 person per 2,000. They list Myasthenia Gravis as a "rare disease".
Source - Orphanet

Myasthenia Gravis: Introduction

Types of Myasthenia Gravis:

Types of Myasthenia Gravis:

  • Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis - the classic autoimmune form.
  • Congenital myasthenia - a rare genetic non-autoimmune form occurring in infants.
  • more types...»

Broader types of Myasthenia Gravis:

How many people get Myasthenia Gravis?

Prevalance of Myasthenia Gravis: about 5 per 100,000 to 14 per 100,000 (NWHIC)
Prevalance Rate of Myasthenia Gravis: approx 1 in 20,000 or 0.00% or 13,600 people in USA [about data]
Prevalance of Myasthenia Gravis: Myasthenia gravis occurs in about five people per 100,000. (Source: excerpt from MYASTHENIA GRAVIS: NWHIC)

Who gets Myasthenia Gravis?

Patient Profile for Myasthenia Gravis: Children to young adults, typically 20's and 30's.

Gender Profile for Myasthenia Gravis: Women 2:1 (NWHIC).

How serious is Myasthenia Gravis?

Prognosis of Myasthenia Gravis: Good. Many people go into remission or suffer only mild disability.
Complications of Myasthenia Gravis: see complications of Myasthenia Gravis
Prognosis of Myasthenia Gravis: With treatment, the outlook for most patients with myasthenia is bright: they can expect to lead normal or nearly normal lives. Some case of myasthenia gravis may go into remission temporarily, and muscle weakness may disappear so that medications can be discontinued. In a few cases, the severe weakness of myasthenia gravis may cause respiratory failure, which requires immediate emergency medical care. (Source: excerpt from NINDS Myasthenia Gravis Information Page: NINDS) ... Treatment can induce remission, and people can lead productive lives. (Source: excerpt from Neuromuscular Diseases: NWHIC)

What causes Myasthenia Gravis?

Causes of Myasthenia Gravis: see causes of Myasthenia Gravis
Causes of Myasthenia Gravis: Myasthenia gravis is caused by a defect in the transmission of nerve impulses to muscles. Normally when impulses travel down the nerve, the nerve endings release a neurotransmitter substance called acetylcholine. In myasthenia gravis, antibodies produced by the body's own immune system block, alter, or destroy the receptors for acetylcholine. (Source: excerpt from NINDS Myasthenia Gravis Information Page: NINDS)

What are the symptoms of Myasthenia Gravis?

Symptoms of Myasthenia Gravis: see symptoms of Myasthenia Gravis

Complications of Myasthenia Gravis: see complications of Myasthenia Gravis

Can anyone else get Myasthenia Gravis?

Contagion of autoimmunity: generally not; see details in contagion of autoimmune diseases.

Myasthenia Gravis: Testing

Diagnostic testing: see tests for Myasthenia Gravis.

Misdiagnosis: see misdiagnosis and Myasthenia Gravis.

How is it treated?

Doctors and Medical Specialists for Myasthenia Gravis: Neurologist ; see also doctors and medical specialists for Myasthenia Gravis.
Treatments for Myasthenia Gravis: see treatments for Myasthenia Gravis
Research for Myasthenia Gravis: see research for Myasthenia Gravis

Society issues for Myasthenia Gravis


Hospitalization statistics for Myasthenia Gravis: The following are statistics from various sources about hospitalizations and Myasthenia Gravis:

  • 0.014% (1,813) of hospital consultant episodes were for myasthenia gravis and other myoneural disorders in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 83% of hospital consultant episodes for myasthenia gravis and other myoneural disorders required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 45% of hospital consultant episodes for myasthenia gravis and other myoneural disorders were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 69% of hospital consultant episodes for myasthenia gravis and other myoneural disorders were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 31% of hospital consultant episodes for myasthenia gravis and other myoneural disorders required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 12.6 days was the mean length of stay in hospitals for myasthenia gravis and other myoneural disorders in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 6 days was the median length of stay in hospitals for myasthenia gravis and other myoneural disorders in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • more statistics...»

Organs Affected by Myasthenia Gravis:

Organs and body systems related to Myasthenia Gravis include:

Name and Aliases of Myasthenia Gravis

Main name of condition: Myasthenia Gravis

Class of Condition for Myasthenia Gravis: autoimmune

Other names or spellings for Myasthenia Gravis:

MG, Goldflam disease

Erb-Goldflam disease Source - Diseases Database

Myasthenia gravis, Myasthenia
Source - WordNet 2.1

Myasthenia Gravis: Related Conditions

Research the causes of these diseases that are similar to, or related to, Myasthenia Gravis:

 

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