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Dictionary » Hemophilia B
 

Hemophilia B

Introduction: Hemophilia B

Description of Hemophilia B

Hemophilia B (medical condition): A rare coagulation disorder caused by a deficiency of factor IX which...more »

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Hemophilia B:
  »Introduction: Hemophilia B
  »Symptoms of Hemophilia B

Hemophilia B: A deficiency of blood coagulation factor IX inherited as an X-linked disorder. (Also known as Christmas Disease, after the first patient studied in detail, not the holy day.) Historical and clinical features resemble those in classic hemophilia (HEMOPHILIA A), but patients present with fewer symptoms. Severity of bleeding is usually similar in members of a single family. Many patients are asymptomatic until the hemostatic system is stressed by surgery or trauma. Treatment is similar to that for hemophilia A. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1008)
Source: Diseases Database

Hemophilia B: deficiency of blood coagulation factor IX inherited as an X-linked disorder; clinical features resemble those in hemophilia A, but patients present with fewer symptoms.
Source: CRISP

Hemophilia B: A deficiency of blood coagulation factor IX inherited as an X-linked disorder. (Also known as Christmas Disease, after the first patient studied in detail, not the holy day.) Historical and clinical features resemble those in classic hemophilia (HEMOPHILIA A), but patients present with fewer symptoms. Severity of bleeding is usually similar in members of a single family. Many patients are asymptomatic until the hemostatic system is stressed by surgery or trauma. Treatment is similar to that for hemophilia A. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1008).
Source: MeSH 2007

Hemophilia B: Related Topics

These medical condition or symptom topics may be relevant to medical information for Hemophilia B:

Hemophilia B: Rare Disease

Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Hemophilia B is listed as a "rare disease" by the Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This means that Hemophilia B, or a subtype of Hemophilia B, affects less than 200,000 people in the US population.
Source - National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Hemophilia B as a Disease

Hemophilia B (medical condition): See Hemophilia B (disease information).
  »Introduction: Hemophilia B
  »Symptoms of Hemophilia B

Hemophilia B: Related Diseases

Hemophilia B: Hemophilia B is listed as a type of (or associated with) the following medical conditions in our database:

More information on medical condition: Hemophilia B:

Hemophilia B: Related Disease Topics

These medical disease topics may be related to Hemophilia B:

Terms associated with Hemophilia B:

Terms Similar to Hemophilia B:

Source: Diseases Database

Source - NIH

Source - MeSH 2007

Related Topics

Source - MeSH 2007

Broader terms for Hemophilia B

Source - MeSH 2007

Source - CRISP

The term Hemophilia B can be used for:

Source: CRISP

Other terms that may be related to Hemophilia B:

Source: CRISP

Hierarchical classifications of Hemophilia B

The following list attempts to classify Hemophilia B into categories where each line is subset of the next.

MeSH 2007 Hierarchy:

MeSH 2007 Hierarchy

MeSH 2007 Hierarchy

MeSH 2007 Hierarchy

MeSH 2007 Hierarchy

External links related to: Hemophilia B

Source: Diseases Database

Interesting Medical Articles:

Medical dictionaries:

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