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Diseases » Narcolepsy » Summary
 

What is Narcolepsy?

What is Narcolepsy?

  • Narcolepsy: Narcolepsy is characterized by the classic tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis.
  • Narcolepsy: A condition characterized by recurrent episodes of daytime somnolence and lapses in consciousness (microsomnias) that may be associated with automatic behaviors and AMNESIA. CATAPLEXY; SLEEP PARALYSIS, and hypnagogic HALLUCINATIONS frequently accompany narcolepsy. The pathophysiology of this disorder includes sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which normally follows stage III or IV sleep. (From Neurology 1998 Feb;50(2 Suppl 1):S2-S7)
    Source - Diseases Database
  • Narcolepsy: a sleep disorder characterized by sudden and uncontrollable episodes of deep sleep; "he believes that narcolepsy is attributable to an inability to suppress REM sleep during waking".
    Source - WordNet 2.1

Narcolepsy is listed as a "rare disease" by the Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This means that Narcolepsy, or a subtype of Narcolepsy, affects less than 200,000 people in the US population.
Source - National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Narcolepsy: Introduction

Types of Narcolepsy:

Broader types of Narcolepsy:

How many people get Narcolepsy?

Prevalance of Narcolepsy: 200,000 Americans (NHLBI estimate); 50,000 diagnosed.
Prevalance Rate of Narcolepsy: approx 1 in 1,359 or 0.07% or 200,000 people in USA [about data]
Undiagnosed prevalence of Narcolepsy: estimated 150,000 undiagnosed (based on NHLBI estimates)
Undiagnosed prevalence rate of Narcolepsy: approx 1 in 1,813 or 0.06% or 150,000 people in USA [about data]
Prevalance of Narcolepsy: Although it is estimated that narcolepsy afflicts as many as 200,000 Americans, fewer than 50,000 are diagnosed. (Source: excerpt from Narcolepsy: NWHIC)

Who gets Narcolepsy?

Patient Profile for Narcolepsy: Typically adolescence or young adults but any age possible.

Profile for Narcolepsy: Symptoms generally begin between the ages of 15 and 30. (Source: excerpt from NINDS Narcolepsy Information Page: NINDS) ... Narcolepsy can occur in both men and women at any age although its symptoms are usually first noticed in teenagers or young adults. (Source: excerpt from Narcolepsy: NWHIC)

How serious is Narcolepsy?

Prognosis of Narcolepsy: With proper management and treatment, patients with narcolepsyusually lead meaningful and productive personal and professional lives.
Complications of Narcolepsy: see complications of Narcolepsy
Prognosis of Narcolepsy: Although narcolepsy is a life-long condition, most individuals with the disorder enjoy a near-normal lifestyle with adequate medication and support from teachers, employers, and families. If not properly diagnosed and treated, narcolepsy may have a devastating impact on the life of the affected individual, causing social, educational, psychological, and financial difficulties. (Source: excerpt from NINDS Narcolepsy Information Page: NINDS) ... Narcolepsy is an incurable life-long condition that requires continuous medication to reduce its symptoms. (Source: excerpt from Narcolepsy: NWHIC)

What causes Narcolepsy?

Causes of Narcolepsy: see causes of Narcolepsy
Cause of Narcolepsy: Unknown.
Causes of Narcolepsy: The normal stages of sleep include a phase of rapid eye movement (REM). It is during the REM phase of sleep when we dream and during this time that our muscles become completely relaxed. The problem in narcolepsy is that REM can occur while awake, resulting in half-sleep dreams and temporary paralysis. (Source: Genes and Disease by the National Center for Biotechnology)
Risk factors for Narcolepsy: see risk factors for Narcolepsy

What are the symptoms of Narcolepsy?

Symptoms of Narcolepsy: see symptoms of Narcolepsy

Complications of Narcolepsy: see complications of Narcolepsy

Onset of Narcolepsy: The age-of-onset distribution is bimodal. The highest peak occurs at 15 years, while a less pronounced peak occurs at 36 years.

Can anyone else get Narcolepsy?

Inheritance: see inheritance of Narcolepsy

Narcolepsy: Testing

Diagnostic testing: see tests for Narcolepsy.

Misdiagnosis: see misdiagnosis and Narcolepsy.

How is it treated?

Treatments for Narcolepsy: see treatments for Narcolepsy
Research for Narcolepsy: see research for Narcolepsy

Society issues for Narcolepsy


Hospitalization statistics for Narcolepsy: The following are statistics from various sources about hospitalizations and Narcolepsy:

  • 0.001% (118) of hospital consultant episodes were for narcolepsy and cataplexy in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 98% of hospital consultant episodes for narcolepsy and cataplexy required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 74% of hospital consultant episodes for narcolepsy and cataplexy were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 26% of hospital consultant episodes for narcolepsy and cataplexy were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 6% of hospital consultant episodes for narcolepsy and cataplexy required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • more statistics...»

Organs Affected by Narcolepsy:

Organs and body systems related to Narcolepsy include:

Name and Aliases of Narcolepsy

Main name of condition: Narcolepsy

Other names or spellings for Narcolepsy:

Narcoleptic Syndrome

Gelineau syndrome Source - Diseases Database

Narcoleptic Syndrome
Source - Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Narcolepsy: Related Conditions

Research the causes of these diseases that are similar to, or related to, Narcolepsy:

 

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