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Glossary for Non-pathogenic inflammatory conditions

  • Achilles tendinitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation and tenderness located in the Achilles tendon of the leg
  • Achilles tendonitis: Condition causing pain and inflammation in the insertion point of the Achilles tendon, usually due to activities causing repeated stress on the tendon
  • Acne: Pimples and blackheads on the face and skin.
  • Actinic cheilitis: Degeneration of the lip due to sun damage. The condition is considered precancerous.
  • Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis: A rare neurological disorder where an inflammation of the brain and spinal cord occurs due to damage to the protective covering (myelin sheath) around the nerves.
  • Acute idiopathic polyneuritis: A rare progressive form of ascending polyneuropathy believed to be an autoimmune response.
  • Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome: The association of a sudden kidney disorder with eye inflammation. Autoimmune processes are believed to be involved.
  • Aerotitis syndrome: Trauma to the blood vessels in the ears caused by rapid changes in atmospheric pressure. Blockage of the Eustachian tube in the ear prevents equalization of air pressure and a vacuum develops inside the ear. Yawning or chewing can sometimes alleviate symptoms by opening up the Eustachian tube.
  • Allergic encephalomyelitis: An autoimmune brain and spinal cord disease that can be induced in laboratory animals in experimental settings. The disease involves inflammation and degeneration of nerve myelin sheaths and it may be acute or chronic.
  • Allergic rhinitis: Allergic rhinitis involves inflammation of the mucous membranes of the nose, eyes, eustachian tubes, middle ear, sinuses, and pharynx.
  • Allergic seminal vulvovaginitis: Vaginal inflammation following contact with semen after ejaculation.
  • Alveolitis, extrinsic allergic: A lung disease that tends to occur in people with jobs where they are frequently exposed to organic dust inhalation.
  • Amyopathic dermatomyositis: A rare disorder involving a skin rash that normally occurs with inflammation of skeletal muscles (dermatomyositis) but there is no muscle involvement. It is important to monitor patients in case muscle involvement develops.
  • Ankle Arthritis: Inflammation of the ankle joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Ankylosing Spondylitis: Inflammation of spinal joints similar to rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Ankylosing spondylarthritis: Inflammation of one or more spine joints. The spine becomes progressively painful and stiff and the spine joints may eventually fuse and cause disability. The condition may vary from mild to severe. Inflammation can affect other joints and tissues.
  • Arachnoiditis: A progressive disorder where the arachnoid membrane becomes inflamed and the brain and spinal cord may also become inflamed.
  • Arthralgia similar to that in rheumatoid arthritis: Pain in the joints similar to that of rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Arthritis: General name for any type of joint inflammation, but often means age-related osteoarthritis.
  • Arthritis pain: Arthritis is inflammation of one or more joints, which results in pain, swelling, stiffness, and limited movement.
  • Arthritis, Gouty: Joint pain and inflammation (arthritis) caused by gout (buildup of urate crystals). The big toe is most commonly affected but other joints may also be affected e.g. foot, ankle, elbow, wrist, knee and fingers. Usually only one joint is affected at a time. The condition is most often seen in older men.
  • Arthritis-related enthesitis: Inflammation of the entheses due to arthritis. The enthuses is the site at which the tendon or ligament attaches to the bone.
  • Aseptic abscesses syndrome: A rare syndrome involving the development of deep, sterile lesions containing neutrophils. The lesions don't respond to antibiotics but do respond to corticosteroid therapy. The abscesses usually occur in the abdomen and are often associated with conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease and polychondritis. Although the abscesses respond to corticosteroids, more than half of the cases relapse.
  • Aseptic osteitis (generic term): A non-infectious inflammation of the bone. Any bone may be affected
  • Asthmatic Bronchitis: A variant of asthma where cough, either chronic or during an exacerbation following a viral infection, is the main or only symptom
  • Atrophic vaginitis: Type of vaginitis usually related to aging and menopause
  • Autoimmune Hepatitis: Liver inflammation caused due to autoimmune processes where the body's immune system attacks the liver.
  • Autoimmune Hypophysitis: Inflammation of part of the pituitary gland due to an autoimmune process resulting in impaired pituitary hormone production. The range and severity of symptoms is variable depending on the degree of damage to the pituitary gland.
  • Autoimmune Interstitial Cystitis: Interstitial cystitis caused by an autoimmune reaction
  • Autoimmune Myocarditis: Inflammation of the heart muscle due to the body's own immune system attacking it.
  • Autoimmune Vasculitis: A inflammation of the blood vessels caused by an autoimmune reaction
  • Autoimmune limbic encephalitis: Limbic encephalitis is an inflammation of the limbic system which is the part of the brain responsible for basic autonomic functions. In the paraneoplastic type, the inflammation is caused by autoimmune processes.
  • Autoimmune oophoritis: An autoimmune condition where the body's own immune system attacks the ovaries and causes them to become inflamed. It can lead to ovarian function stopping prematurely.
  • Autoimmune orchitis: A inflammation of the testicles caused by an autoimmune reaction
  • Autoimmune uveitis: Autoimmune inflammation of the eye's uvea.
  • BXO: Skin condition of the penis which can effect the glans, prepuce or urethra.
  • Balanitis xerotica obliterans: Dermatological condition affecting male genetalia. Characterised by atrophic white patches and white indurarted tissue at the tip preventing retraction.
  • Balo disease: A rare neurological disorder where the protective sheath around brain nerve fibres are progressively destroyed. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the affected brain area.
  • Barotitis Media: Middle ear injury due to eustachian tube blockage
  • Behcet's Disease: Recurring inflammation of small blood vessels affecting various areas.
  • Bicipital syndrome: Dislocation of the bicipital tendon (the long head of the biceps tendon) due to some form of trauma.
  • Bicipital tendinosis: Inflammation of the bicipital tendon (the long head of the biceps tendon). Occurs mainly in athletes who engage in sports that involve throwing, swimming or golfing.
  • Bicipital tendonitis: Inflammation of the bicipital tendon (the long head of the biceps tendon). It is often associated with some sort of trauma or overuse. It is usually associated with rotator cuff disease.
  • Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis: A rare condition where inflammation of the brainstem results in various symptoms such as ataxia and ophthalmoplegia. The onset of symptoms is usually acute.
  • Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE): A rare condition where inflammation of the brainstem results in various symptoms such as ataxia and ophthalmoplegia. The onset of symptoms is usually acute.
  • Blepharochalasis syndrome: An inflammatory, degenerative disease of the eyelid. The disease goes through periods of remission and involves rapid swelling of the eyelids. The eyelid is stretched and becomes thin and wasted over time. There is no discernable cause.
  • Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome: An illness that sometimes occurs in people with gastrointestinal diseases. It is believed to be caused by a build up of bacteria in a pouch in the bowel which triggers the immune system into action.
  • Brodie knee: Chronic inflammation of the knee joint.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Ammonia inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Ammonia. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Chlorine inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Chlorine. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Diacetyl inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Diacetyl. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Hydrogen bromide inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Hydrogen bromide. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Hydrogen chloride inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Hydrogen chloride. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Hydrogen fluoride inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Hydrogen fluoride. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Hydrogen sulfide inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Hydrogen sulfide. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Methyl isocyanate inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Methyl isocyanate. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Nitrogen Oxide inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Nitrogen oxides. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Ozone inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of ozone. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Phosgene inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Nitrogen oxides. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Polyamide-amine dyes inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Polyamide-amine dyes. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Sulphur dioxide inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Sulphur dioxide. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Thionyl chloride inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Thionyl chloride. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Carcinomatous meningitis: Carcinomatous meningitis, is a form of metastatic cancer that has spread to the lining of the brain and spinal cord, the parts of the body that make up the central nervous system.
  • Cheilitis glandularis: A rare disorder characterized by inflammation of the lower lip which cause it to become enlarged and everted. The mucous glands and excretory ducts of the lip are also dilated. The condition is associated with an increased risk of lower lip cancer.
  • Chemical meningitis: Symptomatic aseptic, chemical meningitis is a rare complication of myelography. A number of these cases have a history of one or more episodes of chemical meningitis preceding their arachnoiditis.
  • Chondritis: Inflammation of the cartilage of the joint
  • Chronic interstitial cystitis:
  • Chronic necrotizing vasculitis: Inflammation and destruction of blood vessel walls which leads to death of associated tissue. Symptoms are determined by the extent and location of the blood vessel inflammation. The inflammation possibly has autoimmune origins. It can occur in condition such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma.
  • Chronic pneumonitis of infancy: A rare form of interstitial lung disease that occurs in infants. Death is common even if treatment is delivered.
  • Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis: A rare chronic inflammatory bone disease that occurs in children. The symptoms go into periods of remission only to return. The most common sites for the inflammation are the shinbone, thighbone and collarbone with usually several sites being affected at once.
  • Collagenous Colitis: A chronic disorder of the digestive system characterized by inflammation and thickening of the large intestine lining.
  • Conjunctivitis ligneous: A rare disorder characterized by the formation of thick, tough, woody (ligneous) lesions on mucous membranes.
  • Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis: Inflammation and damage of the blood vessel walls that also affects the skin. The condition may occur on its own or as a result of an underlying condition.
  • Cystic fibrosis -- gastritis -- megaloblastic anemia: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by cystic fibrosis, anemia and gastritis.
  • De Quervains' disease: Inflammation of the tendons in the thumb which can be very painful. It can be caused by overuse of the thumb or wrist which can occur in activities such as knitting, skiing and lifting heavy objects. The condition primarily occurs in females aged 30 to 50 years.
  • Dermatitis herpetiformis related allergy: Dermatitis herpetiformis related allergy refers to the body's immune system response to gluten. IgA antibodies drive the allergic response to gluten exposure and manifests as a distinctive skin rash. The rash usually affects the knees, elbows, back, scalp and buttocks and can come and go sporadically.
  • Dermatomyositis: A muscle disease characterized by chronic muscle inflammation resulting in progressive muscle weakness and a characteristic rash.
  • Diffuse panbronchiolitis: A pulmonary disease involving chronic inflammation of the airways which causes obstruction and can lead to respiratory failure and even death if untreated.
  • Dissecting cellulitis of the scalp: A chronic scalp disorder involving inflamed nodules and a red scalp.
  • Diverticular disease and diverticulitis:
  • Dyschondrosteosis -- nephritis: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal bone development and kidney disease.
  • Elbow Arthritis: Inflammation of the elbow joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Epicondylitis: Elbow injury from repeated movements.
  • Erythema nodosum, familial: A nodular inflammation of the fatty layer under the skin that tends to occur in a familial pattern. The skin nodules are most often located on the shins.
  • Erythema nodosum, idiopathic: A nodular inflammation of the fatty layer under the skin that occurs for no apparent reason. The condition often resolves itself and is believed to be a hypersensitivity reaction. The skin nodules are most often located on the shins.
  • Familial Cold Autoinflammatory Syndrome (FCAS): An inherited inflammatory disorder which causes periods of fever, rash and pain in joints after being exposed to cold conditions. Symptoms last less than a day and start within hours of exposure to the cold.
  • Familial Eosinophilic Cellulitis: A relatively uncommon, recurring skin condition which is inherited and characterized by flame-shaped, raised, red skin lesions. The skin lesions usually blister and change color and resolve after a few weeks. One or more skin lesions may be present.
  • Familial Granulomatosis, Blau type: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Familial Mediterranean fever: A rare inherited condition characterized by recurrent fever and inflammation. The inflammation usually involves the stomach, lungs or joints.
  • Familial hypersensitivity pneumonitis: An immune-mediated lung disease that occurs in a familial pattern.
  • Familial, Systemic, Juvenile Granulomatosis: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Fibrosing alveolitis: A condition characterized by abnormalities in the fibrous tissues between lung alveoli which results in inflammation.
  • Finger Arthritis: Inflammation of the finger joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Gastritis, familial giant hypertrophic: A rare inherited chronic disorder characterized by overgrowth of the stomach lining resulting in excessive folds.
  • Giant cell myocarditis: A rare cardiovascular disease involving inflammation of the heart muscle. The condition occurs for no apparent reason.
  • Giant papillary conjunctivitis: An inflammatory immune reaction to wearing contact lenses or other ocular prostheses.
  • Glomerulonephritis, membranous congenital due to anti-maternal NEP alloimmunisation: An immune reaction involving maternal antibodies which attack the fetus and causes kidney problems. The condition occurs when a mother with a deficiency of NEP becomes exposed to NEP antigen produced by the fetus which results in the production of antibodies that attack NEP and cause kidney damage.
  • Golfer's elbow: Elbow and forearm disorder from repeated motions
  • Gout: Painful joints, most commonly the big toe.
  • Granulomatous arthritis of childhood: A rare chronic inflammatory condition that starts during early childhood and is characterized by arthritic joints, uveitis and a skin rash that forms on the trunk and limbs.
  • Hashimoto's Thyroiditis: Hashimoto thyroiditis is characterized by the destruction of thyroid cells by various cell- and antibody-mediated immune processes. Patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis have antibodies to various thyroid antigens, the most frequently detected of which include antithyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), antithyroglobulin (anti-Tg), and, to a lesser extent, TSH receptor-blocking antibodies.
  • Hashimoto's encephalitis: A rare but serious condition that can occur when thyroid antibodies, such as those present in Hashimoto's thyroiditis, involve the brain tissue and cause neurological symptoms.
  • Hereditary pancreatitis: A rare inherited condition involving recurring bouts of pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) often leading to chronic pancreatitis due to scarring of the pancreas.
  • Hip Arthritis: Inflammation of the hip joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Hunter glossitis: A tongue disorder frequently associated with pernicious anemia.
  • Hypersensitivity pneumonitis:
  • Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis: A rare condition characterized by the presence of recurring urticarial vasculitis, arthralgia or arthritis and hypocomplementemia. Hypocomplementemia involves a reduction or absence of blood complement which is a part of the body's immune system which destroying invading bacteria or other pathogens.
  • Idiopathic diffuse interstitial fibrosis: A rare lung disease involving progressive inflammation and scarring (fibrosis) of deep lung tissue which can cause shortness of breath. In idiopathic forms of the condition, there is no apparent cause.
  • Idiopathic sclerosing mesenteritis: A rare disorder that affects the lining of the digestive tract. The lining of the small bowel mesentery (membrane that joins small intestine to back of abdominal wall) becomes thickened and inflamed. The condition may be mild or severe enough to cause death. The idiopathic form of the condition occurs for no apparent reason.
  • Inclusion Body Myositis: Progressive inflammatory muscle disease causing muscle weakness.
  • Infantile multisystem inflammatory disease: A rare autoinflammatory disease characterized by fever, rash, arthritic changes, eye problems and chronic meningitis.
  • Infantile recurrent chronic multifocal osteomyolitis: A rare disorder characterized by recurring periods of inflammation. The cause is undetermined and tends to affect mostly children. It is often associated with certain autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis and Wegener's granulomatosis.
  • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis: Chronic arthritis affecting children and teens
  • Juvenile dermatomyositis: A very rare autoimmune disorder where the body's own immune system attacks blood vessels and causes them to become inflamed. The condition is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and a characteristic pinkish-purple rash.
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A group of chronic inflammatory joint disorders that affects children. The condition generally involves periods of time where the condition is active followed by periods of abatement of symptoms. In some cases, the condition can be systemic and can cause symptoms such as fever and rash with organ involvement. There are three main types of juvenile idiopathic arthritis - oligoarticular, polyarticular and systemic (Still's disease).
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis, unclassified: A chronic inflammatory joint condition affecting children. This particular subtype is defined as unclassified as it doesn't fit into any of the other classifications.
  • Juvenile temporal arteritis: A rare form of localized blood vessel inflammation that affects older children and young adults. The condition is harmless and any nodules that develop can be removed and do not reappear. The nodules develop in blood vessels in the temples.
  • Keratitis fugax hereditaria: An inherited eye disorder involving recurring corneal inflammation. The number of attacks is variable with anywhere from 2 to even 8 or more episodes occurring each year. The attacks become less severe and less frequent after the age of 50. Symptoms can persist from days to weeks.
  • Keratitis, hereditary: A very rare inherited eye disorder characterized by corneal inflammation. The severity of the disorder is variable.
  • Kimura disease: A rare inflammatory disorder involving the development of clusters of nodules on the head and neck area. Kidney symptoms also usually occur.
  • Knee arthritis: Inflammation of the knee joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Knee tendinitis: Inflammation of the tendons of the knee joint.
  • Leukocytoclastic angiitis -- systemic: Inflammation of small blood vessels. Usually the small blood vessels in the skin are involved but sometimes small blood vessels in other organs such as joints, kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract may be involved. Symptoms become more serious once there is systemic (organ) involvement and death may result in some severe cases.
  • Leukoencephalopathy, arthritis, colitis and hypogammaglobulinemia: A rare syndrome characterized by brain disease, arthritis, colitis and immune system problems.
  • Lupus nephritis: Kidney damage caused by lupus.
  • Lymphocytic colitis: Inflammation of the colon which is only visible through a microscope.
  • Lymphocytic vasculitis: Blood vessel inflammation due to infiltration of blood vessel walls with lymphocytes which can causes raised skin welts which can be tender and painful. The skin often remains darkened after the lesions are resolved.
  • Majeed syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by blood abnormality and recurring bone infections.
  • Major Ulcerative Stomatitis: A mouth condition characterized by large recurring mouth ulcers which can be very painful. There may be one or more ulcers and they can occur on the cheek, tongue, lips or base of gums. The ulcers tend to be 1cm in diameter or larger.
  • McLetchie-Aikens syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by fever and the development of egg-shaped inflammatory nodules in the thigh muscles and eventually in the bicep muscles.
  • Megalocytic interstitial nephritis: A rare form of chronic kidney disease where the kidney is inflamed. The body's own immune system may be involved in the inflammation.
  • Mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis: A rare kidney disorder characterized by blood in the urine caused by a particular type of inflammation inside the kidneys. Immune system abnormalities result in abnormal immune deposits in the mesangial cells (part of the capillaries inside the kidneys) of the kidneys. The mesangial cells become bigger and their numbers increase as a result.
  • Mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis type 1: A rare kidney disorder characterized by impaired kidney function due to autoimmune processes that cause inflammation and changes to the cells that make up the kidneys.
  • Meyenburg-Altherr-Uehlinger syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by recurring inflammation of cartilage which results in deterioration of the cartilage. Any part of the body with cartilage may be affected - ears, nose bridge, larynx, trachea, aortic heart valve and around joints. Symptoms are determined by the part of the body that is affected. Breathing problems and even death can occur if the cartilage in the breathing airways or the aortic valve are affected.
  • Microscopic Polyangiitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of microscopic blood or lymph vessels
  • Microscopic collagenous colitis: Microscopic collagenous colitis refers to inflammation of the colon that is only visible when the colon's lining is examined under a microscope. The appearance of the inner colon lining in microscopic colitis is normal by visual inspection during colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy.
  • Microscopic lymphocytic colitis: Microscopic lymphocytic colitis refers to inflammation of the colon that is only visible when the colon's lining is examined under a microscope. The appearance of the inner colon lining in microscopic colitis is normal by visual inspection during colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy.
  • Microscopic ulcerative colitis: Microscopic ulcerative colitis refers to inflammation of the colon that is only visible when the colon's lining is examined under a microscope. The appearance of the inner colon lining in microscopic colitis is normal by visual inspection during colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy.
  • Mucositis: Inflammation of the mucous membranes in the digestive tract.
  • Multifocal choroiditis: A rare eye disorder involving idiopathic inflammation of the choroid of the eye.
  • Myositis ossificans: A very rare progressive disorder involving calcification of muscles, tendons and ligaments.
  • Myositis ossificans post-traumatic: A calcified mass that can occur in soft tissue or muscle following a trauma to the area. The trauma may result from such things as mechanical injury or tendonitis. The symptoms are determined by the location and size of the lesion.
  • NOMID syndrome: A rare autoinflammatory disease characterized by fever, rash, arthritic changes, eye problems and chronic meningitis.
  • Neck Arthritis: Degenerative arthritic changes in the neck causing pain and loss of function; may be due to age-related degenerative change (osteoarthritis) or due to autoimmune disease (rheumatoid arthritis)
  • Negative rheumatoid factor polyarthritis: A form of rheumatoid arthritis which doesn't involves the presence of rheumatoid factor in the blood. More than one joint is involved.
  • Neonatal hepatitis: A liver inflammation that occurs during the first few months of an infant's life.
  • Nephritis, Familial, without Deafness or Ocular Defect: A progressive kidney disease characterized by the presence of high blood pressure.
  • Neuritis with brachial predilection: A neuromuscular disorder that tends to only affect the arm and hand. It causes muscle pain, weakness and wasting. Physical and emotional stress and pregnancy may trigger episodes. In rare cases the legs may be involved.
  • Neuromyelitis Optica: A demyelinating disorder associated with transverse myelopathy and optic neuritis
  • Neuropathy congenital sensory neurotrophic keratitis: A recessively inherited nerve disease which affects sensation and the eyes. Neurotrophic keratitis is a degenerative eye disease caused by damage to the trigeminal nerve. The lack of sensation in the limbs results in frequent damage to the tissues as the patient is unaware of pain or temperature.
  • Osgood Schlatter Condition: A knee condition believed to be caused by excessive tendon pulling on the kneecap. The bony portion betweent the lower kneecap and upper shin becomes painful, inflamed and swollen. Continuation of certain activities such as running and jumping can make the condition worse. Symptoms usually persist for weeks or months. One or both knees may be affected.
  • Osgood-Schlatter Disease: Knee condition with inflammation of tendons and tissues.
  • Pancolitis: Pancolitis is also known as ulcerative colitis which is an idiopathic chronicinflammatory disorder of the colon and rectum and involves the entire thickness of the colon.
  • Papillitis: A progressive eye disorder characterized by inflammation and degeneration of part of the optic nerve (optic disk) which can result in blindness and can affect only one, or both eyes. The degree of vision loss is variable.
  • Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis: Limbic encephalitis is an inflammation of the limbic system which is the part of the brain responsible for basic autonomic functions. In the paraneoplastic type, the inflammation is caused by cancers such as small cell lung cancer.
  • Pauciarticular chronic arthritis: A rare condition characterized by chronic arthritis that occurs in several joints.
  • Pauli's hypersensitivity pneumonitis: Inhalation of Pauli's reagent in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Pediatric granulomatous arthritis: A rare chronic inflammatory condition that starts during early childhood and is characterized by arthritic joints, uveitis and a skin rash that forms on the trunk and limbs.
  • Perennial allergic rhinitis: A condition which is characterized by a constant allergic reaction of the nasal mucousa
  • Perennial rhinitis: A condition which is characterized by a constant inflammation of the nasal mucous membrane
  • Periadenitis Mucosa Necrotica, Recurrent Type II: A mouth condition characterized by large recurring mouth ulcers which can be very painful. There may be one or more ulcers and they can occur on the cheek, tongue, lips or base of gums. The ulcers tend to be 1cm in diameter or larger.
  • Peripheral uveitis: An eye disorder involving inflammation of the peripheral retina and pars plana which can affect one or both eyes and the severity of the condition can vary.
  • Pfeiffer-Weber-Christian syndrome: A rare skin disorder characterized by recurring inflammation of the fatty layer of the skin and the development of nodules which can vary in size from 1 to 2 cm. The face and hands are not usually affected and the legs and feet tend to be the most commonly affected. The condition tends to reoccur within weeks or months.
  • Pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta: An acute inflammatory skin condition possible caused by abnormal immune system functioning. It involves the development of a skin rash consisting of small skin bumps which eventually blister and form crusted red-brown spots.
  • Plantar Fasciitis: Inflammation of fascia - plantar aspect (bottom) of foot.
  • Plica Syndrome: Knee inflammation usually triggered by overuse or injury.
  • Polyarthritis: Pain and inflammation of more than one joint.
  • Polyarthritis, rheumatic factor-negative: A form of rheumatoid arthritis which doesn't involves the presence of rheumatoid factor in the blood. More than one joint is involved.
  • Polychondritis: A serious, progressive, episodic condition characterized by inflammation and degeneration of cartilage in the body. The duration and severity of the episodes can vary.
  • Positive rheumatoid factor polyarthritis: A form of rheumatoid arthritis which involves the presence of rheumatoid factor in the blood. More than one joint is involved.
  • Primary Glomerulonephritis: Kidney inflammation from autoimmune causes
  • Primary angiitis of the central nervous system: Inflammation of blood vessels that affect the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). There are three main types within this category: benign angiitis of the central nervous system (BACNS), granulomatous angiitis of the central nervous system (GACNS) and atypical primary angiitis of the central nervous system (atypical ACNS). Symptoms vary depending on which particular type is involved and which part of the central nervous system is involved.
  • Pseudogout: A condition which is characterized by an acute inflammatory arthropathy caused by calcium pyrophosphate crystals
  • Pseudomembranous Colitis: Diarrhoeal illness caused by the bacteria Clostridium difficile, usually following a recent course of antibiotics and disruption of normal bowel bacteria
  • Psoriatic Arthritis: Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic disease characterized by inflammation of the skin (psoriasis) and joints (arthritis). Psoriatic arthritis is said to be a seronegative spondyloarthropathy and therefore occurs more commonly in patients with tissue type HLA-B27.
  • Psoriatic Arthritis, susceptibility to: An inflammatory condition where the defective immune system causes joint inflammation as well as skin cells to grow rapidly causing psoriasis. Not all patients who are susceptible to the condition will develop it. There are various environmental factors which can trigger the onset of the disease e.g. strep throat (common trigger), some medication, stress and cold weather. Once the disease develops, it may resolve on its own or with treatment or may become a persistent chronic condition. The severity and duration of symptoms is variable.
  • Psoriatic arthritis, juvenile form: A type of arthritis associated with psoriasis in children. Psoriasis and arthritis are both inflammatory conditions with one affecting the skin and the other affecting the joints. The arthritis tends to precede the psoriasis.
  • Quinquaud's decalvans folliculitis: A form of hair loss involving the gradual destruction and scarring of hair follicles which causes hair loss which spreads outwards from a central point.
  • Rasmussen encephalitis: A very rare disorder of the central nervous system which usually involves only one side of the brain and involves seizures, mental deterioration and progressive weakness on one side of the body.
  • Rasmussen subacute encephalitis: A very rare progressive brain disease possibly caused by immune system problems. Symptoms become progressively worse and then the condition often stabilizes with a long life possible despite permanent neurological damage.
  • Rasmussen's Encephalitis: Rare possibly-autoimmune brain condition.
  • Reactive arthritis: The inflammation of a joint
  • Reflux laryngitis: A voice disorder caused by the backflow of stomach contents into the voice box area which causes swelling and irritation.
  • Relapsing Polychondritis: A chronic disease that affects multiple joints resulting in inflammation and degeneration
  • Respiratory-Bronchiolitis-associated Interstitial Lung Disease: A relatively uncommon form of lung inflammation that has no apparent cause though the majority of patients have a history of smoking. Symptoms tend to develop over a period of six months to one and a half years.
  • Rheumatic pericarditis: Inflammation and swelling of the pericardium (fibrous sac surrounding the heart) that occurs as a complication in people with rheumatism. Rheumatic pericarditis condition may be misdiagnosed as a heart attack and vice versa.
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis Associated with Thymus Hyperplasia: An enlarged thymus gland may be associated with rheumatoid arthritis. The thymus gland is located beneath the breastbone and above the windpipe and heart. It is made up of lymphatic tissue and is believed to be responsible for supporting the development of the immune system from the fetal stage through to puberty. After puberty, the thymus gland tends to shrink.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: Autoimmune form of arthritis usually in teens or young adults.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis related fibromyalgia: Rheumatoid arthritis related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory form of arthritis and is an autoimmune disease.
  • Rheumatoid vasculitis: A rare disorder where sufferers of rheumatoid arthritis with joint inflammation develop inflammation of small and medium sized blood vessels. It tends to mostly affect the blood vessels in the skin. The symptoms are determined by which part of the body is affected.
  • Rhizomelic pseudopolyarthritis: A rare condition which tends to cause muscle pain and stiffness in the neck, shoulder and hip area.
  • Sacroilitis: Inflammation of the sacro-iliac joint
  • Sclerosing Lymphocytic Lobulitis: An inflammatory breast disorder. It is often associated with autoimmune disorders such as diabetes. The lumps that form in the breast tissue appear to similar to cancer and biopsies are needed to conclude a diagnosis.
  • Sclerosing Mesenteritis: A rare disorder that affects the lining of the digestive tract. The lining of the small bowel mesentery (membrane that joins small intestine to back of abdominal wall) becomes thickened and inflamed. The condition may be mild or severe enough to cause death. It may occur for no apparent reason or may be associated with previous abdominal surgery and certain inflammatory disorders such as sclerosing cholangitis.
  • Seasonal allergic rhinitis: A condition characterized by an allergic inflammatory response in the mucosa of the sinuses which is related to the seasons
  • Seronegative Arthritis: Classification given to the group of joint conditions with similar features to rheumatoid arthritis, but affecting different joints and lacking the specific autoantibodies used to identify rheumatoid arthritis
  • Serpiginous choroiditis: A rare chronic disorder characterized by inflammation of small capillaries in the choroids and retina of the eye.
  • Shoulder arthritis: Inflammation of the shoulder joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Shoulder tendinitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the tendons of the shoulder
  • Sigmoid diverticulitis: Colonic diverticulitis is a condition resulting from the perforation of a colonic diverticulum which leads to inflammatory changes occurring mainly in the pericolic structures.
  • Spinal Arthritis: Inflammation of the spine joints. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Spondylarthritis: Inflammation of one or more spine joints.
  • Spondylitis: Inflammation of one or multiple bony vertebrae of the spine
  • Spring catarrh: An allergic eye condition where an abnormal immune system reaction to an allergen results in inflammation of the conjunctiva of the eye (thin clear lining covering the eye and lining the inside of the eyelids). Symptoms tend to be more common in spring and summer due to the increased presence of potential airborne allergens.
  • Superior limbic keratoconjunctivitis: A condition involving the surface of the eye and characterized by periods of inflammation of the conjunctiva - especially the part of the conjunctiva that forms the outermost layer of the whites of the eyes. The exact cause of the condition is unknown. It is important to note that roughly half of patients with this eye condition have and underlying thyroid problem.
  • Sutton Disease:
  • Sutton Disease II: A mouth condition characterized by large recurring mouth ulcers which can be very painful. There may be one or more ulcers and they can occur on the cheek, tongue, lips or base of gums. Sutton disease is differentiated from other aphthous ulcers by size - larger than 1 cm.
  • Sutton disease 2: A rare condition characterized by recurring periods of painful inflamed mouth ulcers.
  • Sympathetic ophthalmitis: Iris and eyeball inflammation as a delayed autoimmune reaction to eye injury
  • Systemic Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis: Onset of JRA with fevers and systemic symptoms
  • Temporal arteritis: Inflamed head artery causing headache.
  • Tendinitis: Inflammation of a tendon.
  • Tennis elbow: Elbow and forearm disorder from repeated motions
  • Tension myositis related fibromyalgia: Tension myositis related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with tension myositis. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues. Tension myositis is a chronic pain syndrome that tends to mainly affect the back, neck, arm and pelvis.
  • Theodore's syndrome: A condition involving the surface of the eye and characterized by periods of inflammation of the conjunctiva - especially the part of the conjunctiva that forms the outermost layer of the whites of the eyes. The exact cause of the condition is unknown. It is important to note that roughly half of patients with this eye condition have and underlying thyroid problem or some other autoimmune condition.
  • Tietze's syndrome: Inflammation and swelling of the cartilage that joins the ribs to the breast bone.
  • Toe Arthritis: Inflammation of the toe joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Traumatic laryngitis: Temporary hoarseness caused by inflammation of the larynx due to such things as bacteria, viral infection, allergies, overuse of voice, tumors and hormonal problems.
  • Tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis: A rare disorder characterized by neurological degeneration and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Ulcerative colitis: Ulcerative colitis (Colitis ulcerosa, UC) is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Ulcerative colitis is a form of colitis, a disease of the intestine, specifically the large intestine or colon, that includes characteristic ulcers, or open sores, in the colon.
  • Ulcerative proctosigmoiditis: Ulcerative proctosigmoiditisis an idiopathic chronicinflammatory disorder limited to the sigmoid colon and the rectum.
  • Uremic pericarditis: Inflammation and swelling of the pericardium (fibrous sac surrounding the heart) that occurs as a complication in people with uremia. Uremia is a buildup of urea and other waste material in the blood due to kidney failure. Uremic pericarditis condition may be misdiagnosed as a heart attack and vice versa.
  • Vasomotor rhinitis: Type of rhinitis related to dry air
  • Vernal keratoconjunctivitis: A rare allergic type of conjunctivitis (inflammation of the lining of the eyelid and most of the eye) which occurs seasonally in warm weather
  • Vulvar vestibulitis syndrome: The inflammation of the opening of the vagina.
  • Wrist Arthritis: Inflammation of the wrist joint. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis: A lipid laden foam cell tumour of the gallbladder resulting in inflammation

 

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