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News » AIDS still leaving orphans
 

AIDS still leaving orphans

Orphans in sub-Saharan Africa are double the percentage of orphans to population resulting from the HIV/AIDS pandemic than other regions around the world. Asia has the most number of orphans, which is relevant to the larger size of its population (1.2 billion vs. 350 million in Africa). There is great concern for the increasing threat of more children orphaned by parents dying with AIDS and the demand on resources from these developing countries from a depleting workforce.

Source: summary of medical news story as reported by Ghanian Chronicle

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Article Source Details

About: AIDS still leaving orphans

Date: 6 October 2005

Source: Ghanian Chronicle

Author: Charles Takyi

URL: http://allafrica.com/stories/200510060548.html

Related Medical Topics

This summary article refers to the following medical categories:

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