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News » Doctor guilty for stillbirth
 

Doctor guilty for stillbirth

An obstetrics registrar was found guilty of medical malpractice after she failed to accurately read a non-reassuring cardiotocograph (CTG), which showed fetal heart rate slowing with contractions. The baby was born stillbirth due to asphyxiation in the birth canal. The doctor, who was regretful of her error, has since retrained and is allowed to continue to work in the obstetrics field.

Source: summary of medical news story as reported by BBC News

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Article Source Details

About: Doctor guilty for stillbirth

Date: 10 January 2006

Source: BBC News

URL: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/4599750.stm

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