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Sleep deprivation linked to obesity

Research is showing a strong association between obesity and lack of sleep. A person who doesn't get enough sleep is more likely to be obese say researchers. This could be because sleep deprivation affects insulin sensitivity and the level of two hormones that are related to appetite. During sleep deprivation, the levels of appetite stimulant increases which leads to overeating and hence obesity. Also, historically, people's bodies have been designed so that the shorter summer days were used to consume and store food for the winter days which were consumed with more sleep. Research results show that people sleeping 5 hours per night were 73% more prone to obesity than those sleeping 7 to 9 hours per night. Six hours of sleep per night equated to a 27% increased risk. Two to four hours of sleep as associated with a 67% increased risk of obesity.

Source: summary of medical news story as reported by WebMD Medical News

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Article Source Details

About: Sleep deprivation linked to obesity

Date: 16 November 2004

Source: WebMD Medical News

Author: Miranda Hitti

URL: http://my.webmd.com/content/article/97/104033.htm

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