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Causes of Ocular histoplasmosis syndrome

Ocular histoplasmosis syndrome Causes: Risk Factors

The following conditions have been cited in various sources as potentially causal risk factors related to Ocular histoplasmosis syndrome:

Ocular histoplasmosis syndrome: Related Medical Conditions

To research the causes of Ocular histoplasmosis syndrome, consider researching the causes of these these diseases that may be similar, or associated with Ocular histoplasmosis syndrome:

Ocular histoplasmosis syndrome: Causes and Types

Causes of Broader Categories of Ocular histoplasmosis syndrome: Review the causal information about the various more general categories of medical conditions:

Ocular histoplasmosis syndrome as a complication of other conditions:

Other conditions that might have Ocular histoplasmosis syndrome as a complication may, potentially, be an underlying cause of Ocular histoplasmosis syndrome. Our database lists the following as having Ocular histoplasmosis syndrome as a complication of that condition:

What causes Ocular histoplasmosis syndrome?

Article excerpts about the causes of Ocular histoplasmosis syndrome:

Facts About Histoplasmosis: NEI (Excerpt)

Scientists believe that Histoplasma capsulatum (histo) spores spread from the lungs to the eye, lodging in the choroid, a layer of blood vessels that provides blood and nutrients to the retina. The retina is the light-sensitive layer of tissue that lines the back of the eye. Scientists have not yet been able to detect any trace of the histo fungus in the eyes of patients with ocular histoplasmosis syndrome. Nevertheless, there is good reason to suspect the histo organism as the cause of OHS. (Source: excerpt from Facts About Histoplasmosis: NEI)

Facts About Histoplasmosis: NEI (Excerpt)

OHS develops when fragile, abnormal blood vessels grow underneath the retina. These abnormal blood vessels form a lesion known as choroidal neovascularization (CNV). If left untreated, the CNV lesion can turn into scar tissue and replace the normal retinal tissue in the macula. The macula is the central part of the retina that provides the sharp, central vision that allows us to read a newspaper or drive a car. When this scar tissue forms, visual messages from the retina to the brain are affected, and vision loss results.

Vision is also impaired when these abnormal blood vessels leak fluid and blood into the macula. If these abnormal blood vessels grow toward the center of the macula, they may affect a tiny depression called the fovea. The fovea is the region of the retina with the highest concentration of special retinal nerve cells, called cones, that produce sharp, daytime vision. Damage to the fovea and the cones can severely impair, and even destroy, this straight-ahead vision. Early treatment of OHS is essential; if the abnormal blood vessels have affected the fovea, controlling the disease will be more difficult. Since OHS rarely affects side, or peripheral vision, the disease does not cause total blindness. (Source: excerpt from Facts About Histoplasmosis: NEI)

Related information on causes of Ocular histoplasmosis syndrome:

As with all medical conditions, there may be many causal factors. Further relevant information on causes of Ocular histoplasmosis syndrome may be found in:

 

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