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Diseases » Pain » Glossary
 

Glossary for Pain

  • Abdominal Injuries: Any injury involving the abdomen. Injuries may penetrating or caused by a fall or blow to the abdomen. Symptoms are variable depending on the nature of the injury.
  • Abdominal Pain: A condition which is characterized by the sensation of pain that is located in the abdomen
  • Accessory navicular bone: An abnormal bone that develops in the arch in the middle of the foot. Often there are no symptoms but if the bone is large it may rub against shoes and cause problems.
  • Accident or injury conditions: Medical conditions caused by accidents or physical injuries.
  • Achenbach syndrome: A rare condition where a blood blister the size of a coin develops spontaneously on the palm of the hand. Sharp pain and redness accompany the blood blister. In some cases the blood blister can develop after strain or temperature change.
  • Achilles tendonitis: Condition causing pain and inflammation in the insertion point of the Achilles tendon, usually due to activities causing repeated stress on the tendon
  • Acitretin- Teratogenic Agent: Reports indicate that the use of Acitretin during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. Acitretin should not be taken by women who are pregnant or planning on becoming pregnant.
  • Actinomycosis: An infection that results from the bacteria sp. Actinomyces.
  • Acute Appendicitis: Infection of the appendix
  • Acute Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Pain: An acute condition which results in the sensation of distress, or agony due to stimulation of nerve endings
  • Acute VE: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute urinary conditions: An acute condition that occurs in the urinary system
  • Adenitis: Inflammation of a lymph gland
  • Adenocarcinoma: A carcinoma derived from/within glandular tissue.
  • Adenoid cystic carcionoma: Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the breast is a rare neoplasm. It has a biological course of slow progression and near absence of Iymph node metastasis.
  • Aflatoxin B1 exposure: Aflatoxin B1 is a toxin produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aflatoxin B2 exposure: Aflatoxin B2 is a toxin produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aflatoxin G1 exposure: Aflatoxin G1 is a toxin produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aflatoxin G2 exposure: Aflatoxin G2 is a toxin produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aflatoxin exposure: Aflatoxins are toxins produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Alcoholic polyneuropathy: A condition where damage to many peripheral nerves throughout the body results from excessive alcohol consumption. The sensory nerves tend to be affected more than the motor nerves and the legs are usually more affected than the arms.
  • Alendronate -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on rats and rabbits indicate that the use of Alendronate during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • All Disease Categories: All major disease categories
  • Amebic dysentery: Ameba-caused bacterial bowel infection and ulceration.
  • Angio-osteohypotrophic syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by malformation of the peripheral (usually veins) blood vessels and skeletal abnormalities. The malformed blood vessels cause localized soft tissue swellings and if veins in bones are affected, the bone may degenerate due to an insufficient blood supply. Usually the hands are affected.
  • Angiosarcoma: Angiosarcomas are a relatively rare type of malignant tumors that develop from blood vessel tissues. The cancer tends to occur mainly in the liver, skin, breasts and deep soft tissues. The cancer is prone to metastasis to the lymphatic system and is considered aggressive. Symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor.
  • Ankle conditions: Conditions that affect the ankle
  • Ankle injuries: Injury to the ankle
  • Anterior Interosseous Nerve Syndrome:
  • Anterior cord syndrome: Neurological symptoms caused by compression of the front part of the spinal column or damage to the anterior spinal artery.
  • Anterior spinal artery syndrome: Neurological symptoms caused by the blockage of the anterior spinal artery. The blockage may be caused by such things as trauma, cancer, thrombosis and arterial disease. Symptoms are determined by the exact location of the blockage.
  • Arachnoiditis: A progressive disorder where the arachnoid membrane becomes inflamed and the brain and spinal cord may also become inflamed.
  • Arizona Bark Scorpion poisoning: A bite from the Arizona Bark scorpion contains chemicals toxic to the nerve system and can cause serious, life-threatening symptoms.
  • Arm conditions: Conditions that affect the arm
  • Arm injury: An injury to the arm
  • Arterial occlusive disease: A condition which is characterized by occlusion of arterioles
  • Artery conditions: Any conditions affecting arteries
  • Atelectasis: Collapse of lung tissue affecting part or all of one lung. Atelectasis may be an acute or chronic condition. In acute atelectasis, the lung has recently collapsed and is primarily notable only for airlessness. In chronic atelectasis, the affected area is often characterized by a complex mixture of airlessness, infection, widening of the bronchi, destruction and scarring.
  • Atorvastatin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Atorvastatin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Autoimmune Interstitial Cystitis: Interstitial cystitis caused by an autoimmune reaction
  • Autoimmune eye diseases: Eye disease that is caused by an autoimmune disease
  • Autoimmune neuropathies: Nerve diseases from autoimmune damage.
  • Back Impairment: An impairment of the function of the back
  • Back conditions: A group of conditions that affect the back
  • Back pain: Pain from the back or spine.
  • Benign tumor: A tumor or growth that remains localized; not always harmless.
  • Bessel-Hagen disease: A dominantly inherited disorder characterized by growth of multiple tumors made up of cartilage on the bones.
  • Bicipital syndrome: Dislocation of the bicipital tendon (the long head of the biceps tendon) due to some form of trauma.
  • Blastoma: A type of tumor that originates from precursor cells or blasts (immature or embryonic tissue). The symptoms can vary greatly and are determined by the part of the body that is affected. Blastomas can occur in parts of the body such as the brain, liver, kidneys, nervous system, bones and the retina.
  • Blood vessel conditions: Conditions that affect the blood vessels
  • Blue-ringed octopus poisoning: The blue-ringed octopus is found in shallow Australian ocean water and can deliver venomous, potentially fatal bite. The poison is present in the saliva of the octopus. The venom affects the neuromuscular system.
  • Bone cancer: Malignancy that occurs in the bone
  • Bone conditions: Conditions that affect the bones
  • Bosviel syndrome: A rare condition where a blood blister on the uvula ruptures. It often occurs as a complication of tracheal intubation.
  • Bowel strangulation: Twisting of the bowel often around fibrous bands, causing decreased blood supply and death of bowel tissue.
  • Brain Fag syndrome: A type of neurotic disorder that was first observed in white collar workers in Africa.
  • Brain conditions: Medical conditions that affect the brain
  • Breast cancer stages: 0, I, II, III, IV: Cancer stage is based on the size of the tumor, whether the cancer is invasive or non-invasive, whether lymph nodes are involved, and whether the cancer has spread beyond the breast.

    Stage 0- is used to describe non-invasive breast cancers, such as DCIS and LCIS. In stage 0, there is no evidence of cancer cells or non-cancerous abnormal cells breaking out of the part of the breast in which they started, or of getting through to or invading neighboring normal tissue.

    Stage 1- describes invasive breast cancer (cancer cells are breaking through to or invading neighboring normal tissue) in which the tumor measures up to 2 centimeters and no lymph nodes are involved.

    Stage 2- Stage 2 is divided into subcategories known as 2A and 2B.

    Stage 2A- No tumor can be found in the breast, but cancer cells are found in the axillary lymph nodes (the lymph nodes under the arm).

    Stage 2B- the tumor is larger than 2 but no larger than 5 centimeters and has spread to the axillary lymph nodes.

    Stage 3- Stage III is divided into subcategories known as IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC.

    Stage 3A- no tumor is found in the breast. Cancer is found in axillary lymph nodes that are clumped together or sticking to other structures, or cancer may have spread to lymph nodes near the breastbone.

    Stage 3B- the tumor may be any size and has spread to the chest wall and/or skin of the breast

    Stage 3C- there may be no sign of cancer in the breast or, if there is a tumor, it may be any size and may have spread to the chest wall and/or the skin of the breast, and the cancer has spread to lymph nodes above or below the collarbone.

    Stage 4- the cancer has spread to other organs of the body -- usually the lungs, liver, bone, or brain.

  • Buttercup poisoning: The buttercup plant contains a toxic compound called protoanemonin. The plant is most toxic while it is flowering with the sap being poisonous portion of the plant. Poisoning by eating the plant is unlikely due to the fact that skin contact is quite painful.
  • Caesarian Section: Surgery to deliver a fetus from the uterus.
  • Camurati-Engelmann Disease: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by diaphyseal dysplasia, muscle weakness and leg pain.
  • Cancer: Abnormal overgrowth of body cells.
  • Cancer of Unknown Primary Site: Metastatic cancer whose original source is unknown.
  • Cartilaginous neoplasms: Tumors made up of cartilage tissue. The tumors may be benign or malignant and the symptoms will depend on the location and size of the tumors. The tumors can form on parts of the body such as the arm and leg bones or even in the pharynx. The tumors may cause no symptoms in some cases and are only discovered incidentally.
  • Caterpillar complication poisoning: The spines on certain caterpillars can cause a skin reaction as well as systemic symptoms if ingested. The nature of the symptoms vary depending on the species of caterpillar involved. Some only produce skin reactions whereas others can produce systemic symptoms.
  • Catheter infection: Infection due to an inserted catheter
  • Caustic or corrosive substance ingestion: Ingestion of a caustic (alkaline) or corrosive (acidic) substance. Many cases occur when children ingest cleaning products found in the home.
  • Cerivastatin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cerivastatin (a statin medication) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cervix conditions: Conditions of the cervix (entrance) of the female uterus.
  • Charlin's syndrome: A syndrome involving severe pain along the nasociliary nerve which is part of the an eye nerve that leads to the mucosal lining of part of the nose cavity. The pain can be extremely severe in some cases.
  • Chemical poisoning: Morbid condition caused by chemical.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Calcium hypochlorite: Calcium hypochlorite is a chemical used mainly in bleaching products, fungicides, algicides, disinfectants and deodorants. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diethyl Phthalate: Diethyl Phthalate is a chemical used mainly in cosmetic and as a plasticizer in the production of various plastic products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phenol: Phenol is a chemical used mainly in the production of fertilizer, explosives, rubber, paint, paint remover, perfumes, asbestos products, wood preservatives, resins, textiles, pharmaceuticals and drugs. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chest pain: Pain in the chest area.
  • Childbirth: Delivery of a fetus by a pregnant woman.
  • Chloroma: A rare type of tumor that develops from myeloid cells (type of immature white blood cell) and tends to usually have a greenish color. The tumor is essentially a localized solid collection of leukemic cells that occurs outside the bone marrow. It can occur in many parts of the body such as the chest, vertebrae, pelvis, skin, lymph nodes and parts of the skull. On rare occasions, it can occur in various organs such as the heart and brain. The tumor can occur as a primary condition or may be associated with cancerous conditions such as acute leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia. Symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor.
  • Chloromyeloma: A rare type of tumor that develops from myeloid cells (type of immature white blood cell) and tends to usually have a greenish color. The tumor is essentially a localized solid collection of leukemic cells that occurs outside the bone marrow. It can occur in many parts of the body such as the chest, vertebrae, pelvis, skin, lymph nodes and parts of the skull. On rare occasions, it can occur in various organs such as the heart and brain. The tumor can occur as a primary condition or may be associated with cancerous conditions such as acute leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia. Symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor.
  • Cholestasis: A condition where the bile flow is impaired or completely halted.
  • Chondritis: Inflammation of the cartilage of the joint
  • Chondrocalcinosis due to apatite crystal deposition: A rare inherited disorder involving calcium pyrophosphate deposits in cartilage, joint fluid and tissues around joints.
  • Chronic Pain Syndromes: Any of a variety of disorders that can cause chronic pain of different types.
  • Chronic kidney failure: Gradual failure of the kidneys over a period of time
  • Chronic necrotizing vasculitis: Inflammation and destruction of blood vessel walls which leads to death of associated tissue. Symptoms are determined by the extent and location of the blood vessel inflammation. The inflammation possibly has autoimmune origins. It can occur in condition such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma.
  • Chronic pain: Ongoing pain of any type
  • Compartment Syndrome: Excessive bleeding or swelling following surgery or injury can result in increased pressure within a section of the arms, legs or buttocks. The increased pressure affects blood flow and can result in tissue death necessitating amputation, nerve damage or muscle damage. The condition can be chronic or acute which is a medical emergency.
  • Compound fracture: The occurrence of fractured bone the protrudes through the skin
  • Congenital contractures: A muscle condition present from birth where the muscles are abnormally contracted or short. One or more muscles may be involved and the degree of involvement of the individual muscle may vary.
  • Congenital stenosis of cervical medullary canal: A rare birth anomaly where the spinal canal in the upper part of the back is narrower than normal. The narrowing may be inherited or acquired (e.g. trauma). The narrowing of the canal can result in spinal cord compression and associated symptoms.
  • Conversion Disorder: A psychological condition where physical symptoms arise due to emotional dilemmas.
  • Cranial neuralgia: Pain occurring along the root of the cranial nerves
  • Crystal deposit disease: A group of diseases characterized by the deposit of crystals in body tissues. Some examples of such disorders includes scleroderma, dermatomyositis, arthritis and kidney disease. The severity and type of symptoms depend on the nature and location of the crystals deposited.
  • Cutaneomeningospinal angiomatosis: A rare inherited disorder involving a skin birthmark as well as a blood vessel malformation in the spinal cord (angioma). The severity of the spinal involvement is variable with neurological problems occurring as a result of compression of the spinal cord or bleeding. Other cases may be undiagnosed as the cause no symptoms.
  • Cystine stone: A stone caused by a defect in cystine metabolism
  • Cystinuria: A rare inherited condition characterized by the abnormal transport of various amino acids (cystine, lysine, arginine, ornithine) resulting in excess amounts in the urinary system where it can form stones.
  • Daffodil poisoning: Daffodils contain a toxic chemical which can cause poisoning symptoms if ingested. The plant also has the potential to cause skin reactions in susceptible people. The daffodil bulb contains the highest concentration of toxins and accidental ingestion has occurred when the bulb has been mistaken for an onion bulb.
  • Dejerine-Klumpke syndrome: A rare condition where a lower spine lesion causes paralysis of the forearm and hand muscles as well as eye problems. The lesion may occur during birth or as a result of infection, tumor or trauma.
  • Delphinium poisoning: Delphinium is a member of the Buttercup family and contains toxic alkaloids. It's seeds are very toxic but other parts of the plant are also poisonous. As the plant ages, it becomes less poisonous. Toxicity varies amongst species.
  • Dentatorubral pallidoluysian disorder: Pain occurring along the root of the cranial nerves
  • Desmoid disease, hereditary: A rare inherited disorder characterized by the development of benign growths called desmoid tumors or fibromatoses. The growth usually occurs in the abdomen but can occur in the neck, chest, arms and legs. Symptoms vary depending on the size and location of the growths. Even thought the growths are benign the can cause localized damage and obstruction. The condition can stabilize or become progressively worse and ultimately lead to death. The tumors often develop after some sort of trauma such as abdominal surgery or childbirth.
  • Dysmenorrhea: Pain, cramping, or discomfort due to menstruation
  • Dysplasia: Disordered growth in epithelium, typified by a loss in uniformity and normal architecture of the cells.
  • Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica: A condition characterized by overgrowth of the epiphyseal cartilage on one of the hand or foot bones and occasionally on other bones.
  • Eczema: Eczema is a chronic skin condition characterized by skin inflammation and irritation. The severity of extent of the condition is highly variable. It may be caused by allergies, irritants or other factors such as stress.
  • Eikenella corrodens infection: A type of anaerobic bacterial infection. The bacterium (Eikenella corrodens) is normally found in tooth plaque and can cause infection in various parts of the body. It tends to occur in patients with head and neck cancers or diabetics and drug users who lick their needles. Symptoms will depend on the location of the infection.
  • Electrocution: Any injury caused by electricity
  • Emotional stress: A condition which occurs when a person is under stress affecting their emotions
  • Empyema:
  • Endometriosis: Misplaced uterus tissue causing scar tissue.
  • Eosinophilic granuloma: A fairly benign form of bone tumor.
  • Erdheim disease II: A rare condition that occurs as a result of acromegaly which is where excessive growth hormone production results in gigantism. Symptoms include overgrowth of cartilage in parts of the spine and collar bone which causes kyphosis, pain and restricted movement.
  • Eruptive psoriasis: Guttate psoriasis is a skin condition in which small, red, teardrop-shaped spots appear on the arms, legs, and middle of the body. Guttate means "drop" in Latin.
  • Everlasting pea poisoning: The everlasting pea is a vine which bears pink, pea-like flowers and flat seed pods. It's usually found growing in the wild in many parts of the world. The seeds contains various chemicals (amines, phenol, glycoside) which can cause poisoning symptoms if large quantities are eaten.
  • Exercise: The use of the human muscles to improve ones health
  • Exostoses, multiple, type 1: Multiple extoses is a rare condition involving abnormal bone growths that occurs on bones. Type I differs from type II and III in the location of the genetic defect that causes the disorder. Type I tends to involve more bone growths and shorter arm and leg bones.
  • Exostoses, multiple, type 2: Multiple extoses is a rare condition involving abnormal bone growths that occurs on bones. Type II differs from type I and III in the location of the genetic defect that causes the disorder. Type I tends to be less severe than type I.
  • Exostoses, multiple, type 3: Multiple extoses is a rare condition involving abnormal bone growths that occurs on bones. Type II differs from type I and III in the location of the genetic defect that causes the disorder. Type I tends to be less severe than type I.
  • Extramedullary Myeloid Tumor: A rare type of tumor that develops from myeloid cells (type of immature white blood cell) and tends to usually have a greenish color. The tumor is essentially a localized solid collection of leukemic cells that occurs outside the bone marrow. It can occur in many parts of the body such as the chest, vertebrae, pelvis, skin, lymph nodes and parts of the skull. On rare occasions, it can occur in various organs such as the heart and brain. The tumor can occur as a primary condition or may be associated with cancerous conditions such as acute leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia. Symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor.
  • Fairbank disease: A rare inherited disorder that affects the secondary growth centers of bones usually in the hips, knees and ankles and results in mild dwarfism.
  • Falls: When a person losses balance and falls over
  • Familial Wilms tumor 2: A familial form malignant kidney tumor that occurs in children. Type 2 differs from other forms of Wilms tumor by the origin of the genetic defect (chromosome 19q13.4).
  • Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by a short toe, fibrous dysplasia and bone formation in muscles, ligaments, tendons and soft connective tissue.
  • Fibroma: A tumour that is comprised mainly of fibrous connective tissue
  • Flail Chest: The separation of a portion of the rib cage from the rest of the chest wall - usually due to trauma. The severity of the condition varies depending on the extent of the damage.
  • Flurazepam -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Flurazepam during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Forestier's disease: A rare disorder involving by bony growths that can occur various parts of the skeleton.
  • Fournier Gangrene: A necrotizing bacterial infection of the skin on the genitals and perineum. The condition progresses rapidly and immediate medical attention is vital to prevent the bacteria entering the blood steam and resulting in death. It is usually the male genitals that are affected. The risk of the condition is increased by surgery, extreme obesity, diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, leukemia and immune system disorders.
  • Fractures: Fracture of a bone; also "broken bone".
  • Fungemia: The presence of fungi in the blood. Most commonly occurs in people with a compromised immune system. Other risk factors include dialysis, burns, diabetes and use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and steroids. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Gardner-Diamond syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized by bruises which form readily, tend to spread and are painful. Some cases are believed to have a psychological basis.
  • Gas gangrene: A condition characterized by death of tissue usually followed by bacterial invasion and putrefaction
  • Gastritis: Inflammation of the stomach lining
  • Gaucher Disease: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of the enzyme called glucocerebrosidase and accumulation of glycosylceramide (glucocerebroside). There are three forms of this disease: type 1, 2 and 3.
  • Gaucher disease type 1: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of the enzyme called glucocerebrosidase and accumulation of glycosylceramide (glucocerebroside). There are three forms of this disease: type 1, 2 and 3. Type 1 is the visceral, chronic form which usually starts during adulthood.
  • Gaucher disease type 2: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of the enzyme called glucocerebrosidase and accumulation of glycosylceramide (glucocerebroside). There are three forms of this disease: type 1, 2 and 3. Type 2 is acute neurological form apparent in infancy.
  • Gaucher disease type 3: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of the enzyme called glucocerebrosidase and accumulation of glycosylceramide (glucocerebroside). There are three forms of this disease: type 1, 2 and 3. Type 3 is a subacute neurological form which often first appears in childhood.
  • General somatic pain: General somatic pain is a typical sensory experience that may be described as the unpleasant awareness of a noxious stimulus or bodily harm.
  • Genital system cancer: A malignancy that affects the genital system
  • Gestational trophoblastic tumor: A rare tumor that develops in the uterus from cells formed after an abnormal conception (abnormal union of sperm and egg cell). Gestational trophoblastic tumors can also develop from a normal placenta. There are two type of gestational trophoblastic tumors: choriocarcinoma and hydatidiform mole.
  • Giant silkworm poisoning: A pale, yellow-green caterpillar with red legs which has poisonous green spines on parts of its back. It is commonly found in North America.
  • Glioma: A rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor.
  • Glioma Susceptibility: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. There have been at least 8 genetic defects linked to an increased glioma susceptibility.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 1: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 3p25.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 2: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 2 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 10q23.31.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 3: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 13q12.3.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 4: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 4 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 15q23-q26.3.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 5: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 5 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 9p21.3.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 6: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 6 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 20q13.33.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 7: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 7 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 8q24.21.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 8: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 8 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 5p15.33.
  • Glomerulonephritis: Kidney disease where the kidney's have problems removing waste material and excessive fluid.
  • Graft-versus-host disease: A disease characterised by an immune response as a result of a transplantation or transfusion resulting in a widespread systemic inflammatory response
  • Hag moth poisoning: The hag moth resembles a dried leaf and has stinging hairs on its back . It is found mainly in the United states. It is often found feeding on trees and shrubs such as oak, chestnut, dogwood and ash. Contact with the poisonous spines can result in various symptoms.
  • Hallux valgus: A condition which is characterized by the prominence of the inner aspect of the first metatarsal head with bursal formation.
  • Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome: The episodic whiting of fingers in response to the cold
  • Headache: In medicine a headache or cephalalgia is a symptom of a number of different conditions of the head and sometimes neck. Some of the causes are benign while others are medical emergencies. It ranks among the most common pain complaints
  • Hemangioblastoma: A benign tumor that tends to occur in the central nervous system such as the brain and spinal cord. The tumor arises from the stem cells that develop into blood vessels or blood cells (hemangioblasts). Symptoms vary depending on the exact location and size of the tumor.
  • Hemangioendothelioma: A rare type of blood vessel tumor that can occur anywhere in the body but is most often found in the skin, liver and spleen. Symptoms vary according to the exact location.
  • Hemophilus influenzae B: Bacterial respiratory infection with dangerous complications.
  • Hepatoblastoma: A primary malignant liver tumor which is rare in infants and children.
  • Hereditary Hemochromatosis: A genetic disorder where too much iron is absorbed from food and it is stored in various parts of the body which can cause damage. There are 4 types of hemochromatosis and they are distinguished by age of onset, genetic cause and type of inheritance. Some sufferers may be asymptomatic.
  • Hereditary peripheral nervous disorder: A group of inherited disorders affecting the peripheral nerves (nerves other than the brain and spinal cord). The motor, sensory and/or autonomic nerves may be affected. Examples of such conditions includes Dejerine-Sottas disease and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.
  • Hernia: General term for an organ protruding where it should not.
  • Herpesvirus: A group of DNA viruses that occur in humans
  • Hydatidiform mole: A rare condition where an abnormal union between an egg and a sperm results in the formation of grape-like cysts instead of a baby. The growth is not malignant.
  • Hyperostosis cortical infantile: A rare inflammatory disorder that affects bones and soft tissue in infants. The condition may affect virtually any bone and causes excessive enlargement of part of the bone (cortex). Infant feeding problems may occur if the jaw bone is affected which can affect weight gain. The inflammatory course of the disease eventually stops and over time the bones remodel to a normal appearance.
  • Hyperventilation: Excessively rapid breathing causing blood gas imbalances
  • IV infection: An infection that occurs at an intravenous line site
  • Idiopathic Parkinson's disease: Idiopathic Parkinson's disease is Parkinson's disease for which no particular cause can be determined - it is the most prevalent form of the condition. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Inflammatory breast cancer: Inflammatory breast cancer is a rare and aggressive form of invasive breast cancer, where the skin of the breast becomes red, inflamed and pitted in appearance.
  • Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors: A rare tumor that tends to occur mainly in the soft tissue and internal body organs. The more common specific locations are soft tissue, mediastinum, pancreas, gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts, mouth, skin, breast, nerve, bone and central nervous system. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the tumor.
  • Insect bites and stings: Any bites or stings caused by insects
  • Insect sting allergies: When a person has an allergic reaction at the site of an insect sting
  • Insomnia: Insomnia is defined as repeated difficulty with the initiation, duration, maintenance, or quality of sleep that occurs despite adequate time and opportunity for sleep that results in some form of daytime impairment.
  • Interferon Beta -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Interferon Beta during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Intestinal lymphangiectasis: A dilated intestinal lymph vessel. Symptoms depend on the location and extent of the abnormality. It may be a congenital or acquired condition.
  • Invasive breast cancer: Invasive breast cancers usually are epithelial tumors of ductal or lobular origin. Features such as size, status of surgical margin, estrogen receptors (ER) and progesterone receptors (PR), nuclear and histologic grade, DNA content, S-phase fraction, vascular invasion, tumor necrosis, and quantity of intraductal component are all important in deciding on a course of treatment for any breast tumor.
  • Iritis: Inflammation of the iris and anterior chamber of the eye.
  • Iron poisoning: Excessive ingestion of iron - often occurs when children ingest adult iron tablets.
  • Ischemia: Inadequate blood supply to tissues, usually caused by a problem in the blood vessel.
  • Labor Pain: Pain that occurs during active childbirth.
  • Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: A condition which is characterized by proliferation of Langerhans cells
  • Lathyrism: A condition caused by eating certain legumes from the Lathyrus genus of plants. Some of the spacies involved are Lathyrus sativa, cicera, ochrus and clymenum. The chemicals within the legumes of these plants are toxic to the nerves.
  • Lipedema: A disorder where fat accumulates below the skin of the pelvis and legs
  • Lipobay -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lipobay (a statin medication) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lipogranulomatosis: A condition where abnormal lipid metabolism results in the development of yellow liquid-filled nodules in the skin and mucosal linings. The tissue surrounding the nodules can become inflamed as a result of these abnormal deposits. Symptoms are variable depending on the number and location of the nodules.
  • Liposarcoma: A form of malignant mesenchymal tumour usually occurring in the thigh
  • Lobstein disease: A group of rare inherited diseases that involves fragile bones. There are many different types based on the severity and extent of symptoms. Some types are severe enough to cause stillbirth or infant death whereas other types may cause few if any problematic symptoms.
  • Locally advanced breast cancer:
  • Lymphatic Filariasis: Parasitic worm infection of the lympatic system
  • Lymphocytic vasculitis: Blood vessel inflammation due to infiltration of blood vessel walls with lymphocytes which can causes raised skin welts which can be tender and painful. The skin often remains darkened after the lesions are resolved.
  • Malaria: A parasitic disease transmitted through mosquito bites.
  • Malignant Teratocarcinosarcoma: A rare type of cancer that involves connective (bone, cartilage, fat) and epithelial (skin and lining of internal organs) tissue and tends to be of a large size. It often tends to occur in the nose, pharynx and sinus areas. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the tumor.
  • Malignant mesenchymal tumor: A malignant tumor that arises from soft tissue. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the tumor. It is a usually aggressive tumor that can occur muscle, fat, bone and blood vessels.
  • Mazabraud syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by myxoma within muscles and fibrous dysplasia of the bones. The fibrous abnormality tends to occur during periods of growth whereas the myxomas occur during adulthood.
  • Medullary carcionoma: Medullary carcinoma of the breast is a variant of breast cancer. These tumors have a similar presentation to other breast cancers but are distinguished by a characteristic histologic appearance.
  • Melorheostosis: A rare bone disorder involving overgrowth of the outer layer of bone in a linear pattern similar to wax dripping down the side of a candle. Usually one or more bones of a limb are affected.
  • Meningocele: A condition which is characterized by a protrusion of the meninges of the brain or spinal cord through a defect in the spinal cord
  • Meningomyelocele: A very rare developmental disorder where a part of the membrane that covers the spinal cord and part of the spinal cord itself protrudes through an abnormal opening in the bones of the spinal column. The condition may be asymptomatic or if the defect is large, severe neurological abnormalities may result.
  • Metaplastic carcinoma: Metaplastic carcinoma of the breast is a rare neoplasm containing a mixture of epithelial and mesenchymal elements.
  • Metastatic breast cancer: Metastatic breast cancer is the term used to describe cancer that has spread from the original site in the breast to other organs or tissues in the body.
  • Micropapillary carcinoma: Invasive micropapillary carcinoma (IMPC) is a rare subtype of epithelial tumor of the breast. It has a high incidence of axillary lymph node metastasis, in keeping with an angioinvasive phenotype. IMPC was considered an aggressive subtype of breast carcinoma.
  • Migraine: Chronic recurring headaches with or without a preceding aura.
  • Mild chronic pain: Mild chronic pain is defined as pain that persists longer than the temporal course of natural healing, associated with a particular type of injury or disease process.
  • Mitochondrial Parkinson's disease: A form of Parkinson's disease that seems to be linked to mitochondrial defects - mitochondria are the energy-producing components of body cells. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Moderate chronic pain: Moderate chronic pain is defined as pain that persists longer than the temporal course of natural healing, associated with a particular type of injury or disease process and is moderate in intensity.
  • Mucositis: Inflammation of the mucous membranes in the digestive tract.
  • Multiple Sclerosis: Autoimmune attack on spinal nerves causing diverse and varying neural problems.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 1: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 2: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10p15.1.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 3: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5p13.2.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 4: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1p36.
  • Muscle pain: Pain that is located anatomically in the region of muscles
  • Mycetoma: Any of a group of infections caused by actinomycetes (bacterial) or a fungus (eumycetoma). It causes a chronic, pus-producing infection under the skin and sometimes involves bone. The infection most often occurs in the feet. The infection is most common in arid and semi-arid parts of the world. Serious cases can require amputation of the bone.
  • Myeloid Sarcoma: A rare type of tumor that develops from myeloid cells (type of immature white blood cell) and tends to usually have a greenish color. The tumor is essentially a localized solid collection of leukemic cells that occurs outside the bone marrow. It can occur in many parts of the body such as the chest, vertebrae, pelvis, skin, lymph nodes and parts of the skull. On rare occasions, it can occur in various organs such as the heart and brain. The tumor can occur as a primary condition or may be associated with cancerous conditions such as acute leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia. Symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor.
  • Myelomatous polyneuropathy: Polyneuropathy may be associated with multiple myeloma which is a tumour of the plasma cells.
  • Myokymia: Involuntary muscle movement, causing a rippling appearance in the skin.
  • Myoma (fibroid): A benign tumour of the muscle in the wall of the uterus.
  • Nail avulsion: The separation of the nail from the nail bed
  • Nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A malignant cancer that occurs in the nasopharynx area which is the upper part of the throat. Often there are no symptoms until the cancer has metastasized to other parts of the body such as the neck.
  • Nasopharynx cancer: A condition which is characterized a malignancy located in the nasopharynx
  • Nausea: The queasy feeling of nausea and often also vomiting.
  • Nerve cancer: Any cancer that affects the nerves
  • Nerve compression: Compression of a nerve that becomes trapped in a confined space due to any cause e.g. trauma, inflammation or a disease process. This usually occurs near joints. The resulting pressure on the nerve can be very painful and if left untreated can result in damage to the nerve and eventually muscle weakness and wasting. Conditions such as bone spurs, joint swelling due to injury, cysts and trauma can result in nerve entrapment. The exact symptoms will depend on which nerve is trapped and the duration and severity of the entrapment.
  • Nerve conditions: Any condition that affects the nerves
  • Nerve entrapment: Compression of a nerve that becomes trapped in a confined space due to any cause e.g. trauma, inflammation or a disease process. This usually occurs near joints. The resulting pressure on the nerve can be very painful and if left untreated can result in damage to the nerve and eventually muscle weakness and wasting. Conditions such as bone spurs, joint swelling due to injury, cysts and trauma can result in nerve entrapment. The exact symptoms will depend on which nerve is trapped and the duration and severity of the entrapment.
  • Neuroectodermal tumors primitive: A type of brain tumor that consists of small round cells and is believed to originate from primitive nerve cells in the brain. Symptoms are determined by the exact location of the tumor.
  • Neurofibrosarcoma: A rare type of tumor that develops from cells that provide a protective layer around nerves (nerve sheath). Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the tumor. The arms and legs are most commonly affected.
  • Neuropathic pain: Pain that is caused by the nerves
  • Neuropathy, hereditary, sensory, radicular: A rare inherited degenerative disorder of the nervous system characterized by sensory loss in limbs, pain and foot ulcers.
  • Neurosyphilis: A complication of untreated syphilis where the infection invades the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) and causes a range of neurological symptoms. The condition can be life-threatening but some cases are asymptomatic. There are four forms of the condition: asymptomatic, meningovascular, tabes dorsalis and general paresis.
  • Neurosyphilis -- tabes dorsalis: A complication of untreated syphilis where the infection invades the spinal cord and progressively impairs muscle function and nerve damage may also occur. This form of the condition is progressive and life-threatening.
  • Nifedipine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Nifedipine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Nosocomial infections: Any infection that originates in a hospital
  • Notalgia paresthetica: A rare sensory nerve disorder involving the nerves radiating from the spine and characterized by areas of skin on the back that suffer itching, burning, lack of sensation and sometimes pigmentation.
  • Occupational Cancer -- Soft tissue sarcoma: Occupational exposure to chlorophenoxy herbicides can increase the risk of developing soft-tissue sarcoma.
  • Octopus poisoning: Octopus bites are quite rare but octopus such as the blue-ringed octopus can deliver quite a venomous bite.
  • Omphalomesenteric cyst: A very rare umbilical disorder where the omphalomesenteric duct that forms in the early fetal stages fails to disappear during the first couple of months of development and results in the formation of a cyst. The cyst can become infected.
  • Opportunistic infections: Is defined as an infection that occurs due to an organism that does not usually cause disease but becomes pathogenic under certain conditions
  • Oral pharyngeal disorders: Disorders involving the mouth and back of throat area including the pharynx. The disorder may include cancers, structural abnormalities, fungal disease, infections and inflammation. The type and severity of symptoms varies greatly depending on the type of disorder.
  • Osteomalacia: A condition where the bones gradually soften and bend due to poor calcification stemming from a lack or impaired metabolism of vitamin D.
  • Osteopetrosis, intermediate form: A recessively inherited bone disease characterized bybrittle bones with increased density. The intermediate form is less severe than the infantile form but more severe than the adult form.
  • Pain: A feeling of suffering, agony, distress caused by the stimulation of pain fibres in the nervous system
  • Pain Disorder: Somatoform disorder causing pain
  • Pain conditions: Diseases characterized by pain and pain-like symptoms.
  • Pain, Intractable: Pain that is unable to be relived through use of normal medications or other therapies. The pain may be chronic or temporary.
  • Pain, Postoperative: Pain that occurs after any operation. The pain may affect a patients recovery time.
  • Pancreatic Islet Cell Cancer: A malignant carcinoma that is located in the islet cells of the pancreas
  • Papillary renal cell carcinoma: A type of kidney tumor characterized by the development of finger-like projections in at least some of the tumor. It can be inherited in a familial pattern or occur sporadically.
  • Papilloma: A benign tumour that is located in the epithelium
  • Parkinson disease 10 (PARK10): Type 10 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 1p32. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 11 (PARK11): Type 11 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 2q21.2. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 12 (PARK12): Type 12 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome Xq21-q25. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 13 (PARK13): Type 13 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 2p12. This form of the condition tends to progress slowly. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 2, autosomal recessive juvenile (PARK2): Type 2 Parkinson disease is juvenile form of the condition and is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 6q25.2-q27. The condition may be inherited in a recessive manner and symptoms tend to be milder following sleep. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 3, autosomal dominant Lewy body (PARK3): Type 3 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 2p13. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 4, autosomal dominant Lewy body (PARK4): Type 4 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 4q21. This form of the condition tends to start around the age of 45 years and progresses rapidly. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 5 (PARK5): Type 5 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 4p14. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 6, autosomal recessive early-onset (PARK6): Type 6 Parkinson disease is an early-onset form of the condition and is linked to a genetic mutation on the PINK1 gene on chromosome 1p36. The condition may be inherited in a recessive manner and symptoms tend to fluctuate during the day. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 7, autosomal recessive early-onset (PARK7): Type 7 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation in the DJ1 gene on chromosome 1p36. This form of the condition tends to start before the age of 40 years and progresses slowly. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 8 (PARK8): Type 8 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 1p32. This form of the condition tends to progress slowly. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 9 (PARK9): Type 9 Parkinson disease is linked to a mutation in the ATP13A2 gene on chromosome 1p36. This condition progresses rapidly and usually starts during the second decade of life. Dementia, eye movement problems and wasting of the brain tissue occur in addition to the typical symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease, familial, type 1 (PARK1): Type 1 familial Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 4q21. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parotid gland cancer: A malignancy that is located in the parotid gland
  • Parry Romberg Syndrome: Wasting away of one side of the face.
  • Pemphigus Foliaceus: A relatively milder form of the autoimmune skin disorder called pemphigus. Blisters occur on the skin but usually the mucous membranes are unaffected.
  • Percocet withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Percocet use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Peripheral neuroectodermal tumor: A type of tumor that consists of small round cells and occurs in bone or soft tissue in the extremities of the body such as the arms, legs, pelvis or chest wall. Symptoms are determined by the location of the tumor. The tumor may be malignant or benign.
  • Peripheral neuropathy: Peripheral neuropathy is the term for damage to nerves of the peripheral nervous system, which may be caused either by diseases of the nerve or from the side-effects of systemic illness.
  • Phimosis: Where there is constriction of the male foreskin so that it cannot be pulled back over the glans of the penis
  • Pilonidal disease: A condition which affects the hair
  • Pinched Nerve: Nerve paralysis from nerve pressure or entrapment.
  • Placental-site gestational trophoblastic tumor: A rare condition where cancer develops in the uterine muscle and in the site that the placenta was attached. The tumor forms after ectopic pregnancies, abortions or even following a normal delivery.
  • Plant poisoning -- Aconitum: Aconitum is a toxin found in certain plants from the Aconitum genus e.g. Monkshood. It is a highly poisonous neurotoxin that affects the heart and other parts of the body. It can cause serious symptoms and even death in severe cases. The toxin can be absorbed through the skin to some degree.
  • Plasmacytoma anaplastic: A type of cancer from plasma cells where the plasma cells multiply uncontrollably. It can occur in the bone or in soft tissue. If the cancer is located in only one part of the body it is called a solitary plasmacytoma and if there are multiple sites it is called a multiple myeloma. Symptoms will vary depending on the location of the cancer.
  • Polyarthritis: Pain and inflammation of more than one joint.
  • Polychondritis: A serious, progressive, episodic condition characterized by inflammation and degeneration of cartilage in the body. The duration and severity of the episodes can vary.
  • Polyp: An growth or protrusion that extends from a mucous membrane
  • Polyradiculoneuropathy: An inflammatory disorder that affects the peripheral nerves and the spinal nerve roots. The onset and progression of the disease is variable with severe cases resulting in premature death. The condition is chronic and progressive but periodic relapses can occur.
  • Pompholyx (dyshidrotic eczema): Pompholyx is an itchy skin condition characterized by small fluid-filled blisters. The condition tends to predominantly affect the fingers, toes, palms and soles. This form of eczema is relatively uncommon.
  • Porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria: An inherited disorder that affects the nervous system and sometimes the skin. It occurs when a metabolic disorder results in excessive production of coproporphyrins which accumulate in body tissues and is excreted in large amounts.
  • Postherpetic neuralgia: A condition which is characterized by persistent burning pain and hyperesthesia along the distribution of a cutaneous nerve
  • Postoperative septicemia: Septicemia (blood poisoning) after surgery from an infection.
  • Pott gangrene: Tissue death that usually occurs in the extremities of elderly people as a result of arterial blockages. The toes are most commonly affected.
  • Pre-invasive breast cancer:
  • Primary granulocytic sarcoma: A malignant tumor derived from immature white blood cells called myeloblasts. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most commonly found in bone, soft tissue, lymph nodes and skin. Symptoms will vary according to the location of the tumor.
  • Processionary tree caterpillar poisoning: A dark, grey-black caterpillar which can cause varying symptoms on contact with its hairs or spines.
  • Prolapse: The downward displacement of any viscus organ
  • Pseudoainhum: The development of constricting bands of tissue that can result in autoamputation of the part of the limb involved (usually a digit). The disorder may be inherited or acquired.
  • Psychoneurosis: Neuroses is characterized by anxiety, depression, or other feelings of unhappiness or distress that are out of proportion to the circumstances of a person's life.
  • Pudendal nerve entrapment: A condition where a nerve in the pelvis (pudendal nerve) becomes trapped or compressed. The problem can arise due to such things as pregnancy, postsurgical scarring and trauma but may also occur due to a birth malformation. Bicycle riding can also result in the condition.
  • Puerperal disorders: Conditions that affect a woman after the delivery of a child
  • Radial Nerve Entrapment: Compression or entrapment of the radial nerve which runs along the forearm. The problem can result from such things as bone tumors, bone fracture, trauma, lipomas or the repetition of certain arm motion. This nerve is involved in controlling various muscles in the hand, forearm and the wrist.
  • Ramsay Hunt Syndrome type I: A rare condition involving progressive neurological degeneration. It tends to start in adulthood and progresses over a number of years before ultimately ending in death.
  • Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome: A condition characterized by pain and reduced range of motion in the shoulder and hand of the affected arm.
  • Renal carbuncle: Kidney abscess
  • Renal cell carcinoma, papillary, familial: A type of kidney tumor inherited in a familial manner and characterized by the development of finger-like projections in at least some of the tumor.
  • Renal cell carcinoma, papillary, hereditary: A type of kidney tumor characterized by the development of finger-like projections in at least some of the tumor. The cancer can occur in a sporadic manner as well as a familial manner.
  • Renal cell carcinoma, papillary, sporadic: A type of kidney tumor characterized by the development of finger-like projections in at least some of the tumor. The cancer can occur in a sporadic manner as well as a familial manner.
  • Repetitive Motion Disorders: Any of various injuries caused by repetitive motion.
  • Repetitive Strain Injury: Various conditions with inflammation from repetitive movements.
  • Ritter syndrome: A rare infantile skin disorder involving severe redness, inflammation, blistering and peeling of skin and mucous membranes which can result from a variety of infections, malignancies and drugs.
  • Salivary gland cancer: Salivary gland cancer is a rare form of cancer in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the salivary glands in the mouth, neck or throat
  • Sarcoma of the skin: Skin sarcomas develop from soft tissues like skin tissues.
  • Scapuloperoneal amyotrophy: An inherited disorder characterized by muscle wasting and weakness in the shoulder and lower leg.
  • Schwannoma, malignant: A malignant tumor that develops from nerve sheath cells. Any nerve can be affected but it is most common on the sciatic, brachial and sacral plexus (leg, upper arm and lower back nerves). Symptoms are determined by the exact location of the tumor.
  • Self Harm: When a person willingly harms themselves
  • Sensory conditions: Medical conditions affecting the sensory system, especially the sense of touch.
  • Sensory nerve trauma: Injury or damage to a sensory nerve. Sensory nerves are nerves associated with delivering information from the body to the brain and spinal cord relating to the five senses - vision, hearing, touch, taste and smell. Damage to these nerves can result in heightened, reduced or abnormal sensations. Severity of symptoms vary depending on the location and extent of damage to the affected nerves.
  • Septicemia: A systemic inflammatory response to an infection.
  • Severe chronic pain: Chronic severe pain is defined as pain that persists longer than the temporal course of natural healing, associated with a particular type of injury or disease process and is severe in intensity.
  • Sickle Cell Anemia: Sickle cell anemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by red blood cells which are crescent-shaped rather than the normal doughnut shape. These abnormally shaped red blood cells are unable to function normally and tend to undergo premature destruction which leads to anemia. If the genetic defect which causes the condition is inherited from both parents the condition can be quite severe whereas if it is inherited from only one parent, often there are no symptoms. The abnormally shaped red blood cells can cause problems when they clump together and block blood vessels.
  • Sinus tachycardia: A condition which is characterized by a fast heart rate
  • Sjogren's Syndrome: Autoimmune disease damaging the eye tear ducts and other glands.
  • Skin allergies: A reaction to the exposure of the skin to an allergen
  • Skin conditions: Any condition that affects the skin
  • Skin rash: A reaction to the exposure of the skin to an allergen
  • Smoking Cessation:
  • Snake bite: When a person is bitten by a snake
  • Soft Tissue Sarcoma: A rare type of cancerous tumor that originates in soft tissues of the body which includes muscles, nerves, tendons, blood vessels and fat. They can occur anywhere in the body and are often asymptomatic during the early stages and symptoms in the later stages depend on the location and size of the tumor.
  • Soft tissue disorder: Any disorder that affects the soft tissues
  • Soft tissue tumors: Any tumor of the soft tissues (e.g. muscles, cartilage), including cancer and benign tumors.
  • Spider Bites: A puncture wound caused by a spider that may involve the release of noxious substances or bacteria.
  • Spinal AVM: Spinal AVM's refers to a group of abnormal blood vessels (arteries and veins) in the spinal canal. The severity of symptoms depends on the size and growth of the blood vessel malformation. Severe complications such as paralysis can result if the malformed blood vessels rupture and bleed.
  • Spinal Cord Tumor: Cancer of the spinal cord or central nervous system.
  • Spinal cord injury: Spinal cord injury is damage to the spinal cord as a result of a direct trauma to the spinal cord itself or as a result of indirect damage to the bones and soft tissues and vessels surrounding the spinal cord.
  • Spinal cord neoplasm: A growth (tumor) that arises from the spinal cord. The tumor may be benign or malignant.
  • Spondylarthropathy: Refers to a family of related inflammatory disorders that affect the sacroiliac joints, the spine and, less commonly, peripheral joints.
  • Sprains and strains: A joint injury in which some of the supporting tissues are damaged
  • Streptococcal Group A invasive disease: Group A streptococci are bacteria which are commonly found in the throat or on the skin. Often it causes no symptoms but in some cases it can cause mild illnesses such as strep throat or more serious, life-threatening diseases such as toxic shock syndrome or flesh-eating disease. Transmission can occur through direct contact with infected skin sores or nose and throat discharges. Symptoms are determined by the location and extent of the bacterial infection.
  • Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome: Toxic shock from streptococcal bacteria infection.
  • Stroke: Serious brain event from bleeding or blood clots.
  • Sunburn: Any injury to the skin caused by the ultraviolet rays caused by the sun
  • Supraglottic laryngeal cancer: Cancer that arises in the tissue above the vocal cords.
  • Surgical foreign body: A foreign body that is left behind after surgery
  • Syringomelia: A rare disorder characterized by the presence of cavities in the spinal cord which are filled with cerebrospinal fluid. The condition may occur for no apparent reason (primary) or may have a known causes (secondary) such as Chiari malformation, posttraumatic spinal canal compression, posttraumatic myelomalacia, intraspinal tumor or postinfective arachnoiditis. The severity of the condition is greatly variable with some people remaining generally asymptomatic whereas others suffer disability and require surgical intervention.
  • Syringomyelia: Spinal cord cysts
  • Tacrolimus -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Tacrolimus during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Tarlov cysts: Development of a cyst in the spinal nerve. Symptoms can be asymptomatic or severe depending on the size and location of the cyst.
  • Telangiectasia: The permanent dilation of pre-existing small blood vessels
  • Teratoma: A neoplasm made up of different types of tissue
  • Thalamic Syndrome (Dejerine Roussy): A rare neurological condition where damage to the part of the brain that controls sensation (thalamus) results in excessive pain in response to mild stimulation or reduced sensation. The limbs and face are the parts of the body most often affected.
  • Thromboembolism: Lodgement of a blood clot causing blockage
  • Thyroid cancer, follicular: A usually slow-growing cancer of the thyroid gland which is rarely fatal. The cancer develops from cells in the thyroid that produce iodine-containing hormones. This type of cancer usually responds well to treatment.
  • Thyroid cancer, medullary: Cancer of the thyroid gland. The cancer develops from the parafollicular cells or in the thyroid gland which produced calcitonin. This type of cancer does not respond to treatment as well as papillary or follicular thyroid cancer. This form of thyroid cancer may be inherited.
  • Thyroid cancer, papillary: A usually slow-growing cancer of the thyroid gland which is rarely fatal. The cancer develops from cells in the thyroid that produce iodine-containing hormones. This type of cancer usually responds well to treatment.
  • Tick bite: When an individual is bitten by a tick
  • Tick-borne diseases: Any disease that is transferred to humans by the tick
  • Torsion: Twisting of the spermatic cord which obstructs blood flow to and from the testes.
  • Torulopsis: A type of yeast infection caused by Torulopsis glabrata. The fungus is often found in normal healthy skin, respiratory system, genitourinary system and gastrointestinal system and it generally only becomes a problem in weakened or immunocompromised people. They type of symptoms are determined by where and how severe the infection is.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Agenerase: Use of an HIV drug called Agenerase may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Amiodarone: Use of a cardiovascular drug called Amiodarone may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Amiodarone tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Amitriptyline: Use of drug called Amitriptyline may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Amitriptyline tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Amphotericin: Use of drug called Amphotericin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Amphotericin tends to primarily affect muscle movement (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Amprenavir: Use of an HIV drug called Amprenavir may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Calcium Carbimide: Use of a drug called Calcium Carbimide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Calcium Carbimide tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Carbutamide: Use of drug called Carbutamide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Carbutamide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Chlorambucil: Use of a cancer drug called Chlorambucil may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Chlorambucil tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Chloramphenicol: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Chloramphenicol may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Chloramphenicol tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Chloroquine: Use of an antirheumatic drug called Chloroquine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Chloroquine tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Chlorpropamide: Use of drug called Chlorpropamide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Chlorpropamide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Cisplatin: Use of a cancer drug called Cisplatin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Clioquinol: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Clioquinol may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Clioquinol tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Clofibrate: Use of a cardiovascular drug called Clofibrate may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Clofibrate tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Colchicine: Use of an antirheumatic drug called Colchicine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Colchicine tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Colistin: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Colistin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Colistin tends to cause mainly paresthesia.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Cytarabine: Use of a cancer drug called Cytarabine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Cytarabine tends to cause mainly paresthesia.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Dapsone: Use of Dapsone, a drug used to tread skin conditions, may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Diamines: Use of a type of antimicrobial drug called Diamines may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Thiamphenicol tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Didanosine: Use of an HIV drug called Didanosine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Disopyramide: Use of a cardiovascular drug called Disopyramide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Disopyramide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Disulfiram: Use of drug called Disulfiram may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Disulfiram tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Ergotamine: Use of a drug called Ergotamine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Ergotamine tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Ethambutol: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Ethambutol may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Ethambutol tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Ethionamide: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Ethionamide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Ethionamide tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Ethoglucid: Use of a drug called Ethoglucid may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Ethoglucid tends to cause mainly localized neuropathy.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Gemfibrozil: Use of a cholesterol-lowering drug called Gemfibrozil may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Glutethimide: Use of drug called Glutethimide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Glutethimide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Gold: Therapeutic use of gold to treat rheumatism may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). The nerve toxicity of the substance may vary amongst people - tolerance level to the drug varies amongst people. Gold tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Hivid: Use of an HIV drug called Hivid may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Hydralazine: Use of a blood pressure drug called Hydralazine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Indapamid: Use of a diuretic and antihypertensive agent called Indapamid may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Indomethacin: Use of an antirheumatic drug called Indomethacin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Indomethacin tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Isoniazid: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Isoniazid may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Isoniazid tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy). B6 supplements may help prevent the neuropathy.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Lopid: Use of a cholesterol-lowering drug called Lopid may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Lovastatin: Use of a cholesterol-lowering drug called Lovastatin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Lozol: Use of a cholesterol-lowering drug called Lozol may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Methaqualone: Use of drug called Methaqualone may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Methaqualone tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Methimazole: Use of drug called Methimazole may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Methimazole tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Methysergide: Use of a drug called Methysergide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Methysergide tends to cause mainly paresthesia.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Metronidazole: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Metronidazole may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Metronidazole tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Mevacor: Use of a cholesterol-lowering drug called Mevacor may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Mustine: Use of a drug called mustine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Mustine tends to mainly cause localized neuropathy.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Nalidixic Acid: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Nalidixic Acid may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Nalidixic Acid tends to cause mainly paresthesia.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Nitrofurantoin: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Nitrofurantoin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Nitrofurantoin tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Nitrofurazone: Use of a cancer drug called Nitrofurazone may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Nitrofurazone tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Norvir: Use of an HIV drug called Norvir may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Perhexiline: Use of a cardiovascular drug called Perhexiline may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Perhexiline tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Phenelzine: Use of a drug called Phenelzine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Phenelzine tends to cause mainly paresthesia.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Phenylbutazone: Use of an antirheumatic drug called Phenylbutazone may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Phenylbutazone tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Phenytoin: Use of drug called Phenytoin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Phenytoin tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Podophyllum: Use of a cancer drug called Podophyllum may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Podophyllum tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Procarbazine: Use of a cancer drug called Procarbazine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Procarbazine tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Propranolol: Use of a cardiovascular drug called Propranolol may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Propranolol tends to cause mainly paresthesia.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Propylthiouracil: Use of a drug called Propylthiouracil may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Propylthiouracil tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Retrovir: Use of an HIV drug called Retrovir may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Ritonavir: Use of an HIV drug called Ritonavir may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Stavudine: Use of an HIV drug called Stavudine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Streptomycin: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Streptomycin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Streptomycin tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Sulfoxone: Use of a drug called Sulfoxone may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sulfoxone tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Sulphonamide: Use of Sulphonamide drugs may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sulphonamide tends to primarily affect muscle movement (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Sulthiame: Use of a drug called Sulthiame may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sulthiame tends to cause mainly paresthesia.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Thalidomide: Use of drug called Thalidomide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Thalidomide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Thiamphenicol: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Thiamphenicol may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Thiamphenicol tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Tolbutamide: Use of drug called Tolbutamide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Tolbutamide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Trichloroethylene: Trichloroethylene is often used as an industrial degreaser. Exposure the trichloroethylene can cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) due to its toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Videx: Use of an HIV drug called Videx may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Vincristine: Use of a cancer drug called Vincristine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Vincristine tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Zalcitabine: Use of an HIV drug called Zalcitabine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Zerit: Use of an HIV drug called Zerit may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Zidovudine: Use of an HIV drug called Zidovudine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Tranquilizer withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when tranquilzer use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Tranquilizers includes benzodiazepines such as valium, rohypnol and serepax.
  • Transitional cell carcinoma: A type of cancer that occurs in the lining of the urinary system organs (renal pelvis, bladder or ureter).
  • Transverse myelitis: Inflammation of the spinal cord which results in various neurological and muscle symptoms. The inflammation can occur for no obvious reason or may result from a virus, bacterial infection, autoimmune disease or vaccination. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and degree of inflammation.
  • Tumoral calcinosis: A rare disorder characterized by calcified nodules in soft tissue around joints. Abnormal mineral metabolism results in calcium being deposited in the soft tissue. The nodules may become progressively larger and can cause pain.
  • Umbilical cord ulceration and intestinal atresia: A condition which is characterised by umbilical cord ulceration and intestinal atresia
  • Urethral obstruction sequence: A condition which is characterised by the early obstruction of the urethra.
  • Uterine sarcoma: A rare type of cancer that occurs in the uterus or associated tissues. A sarcoma is a cancer that involves soft tissue and connective tissue such as bone, cartilage, fat, muscle and blood vessels.
  • Vaginosis (bacterial vaginosis): A bacterial infection of the vagina causing offensive discharge.
  • Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: The bovine spongiform encephalopathy affects cattle but the variant form can infect humans. Human infection can occur by consuming infected cattle products, especially the brain and other central nervous system tissues.
  • Vein disorders: Any disorder that affects the veins of an individual
  • Vulvodynia: painful or uncomfortable vulva (external female genitalia) from any cause
  • Wallenberg's Syndrome: A rare neurological condition caused by a stroke (involving the cerebellar artery) and resulting in symptoms such as facial paralysis or weakness on one side of body.
  • War sailor syndrome: A type of post-traumatic stress disorder that occurred in merchant ship sailors from World War II.
  • Wilms tumor 2: A familial form malignant kidney tumor that occurs in children. Type 2 differs from other forms of Wilms tumor by the origin of the genetic defect (chromosome 11p15.5).
  • Wilms tumor 3: A dominantly inherited form malignant kidney tumor that occurs in children. Type 3 differs from other forms of Wilms tumor by the origin of the genetic defect (chromosome 16q).
  • Wilms tumor 4: A familial form malignant kidney tumor that occurs in children. Type 4 differs from other forms of Wilms tumor by the origin of the genetic defect (chromosome 17q12-q21).
  • Wilms tumor and radial bilateral aplasia: A condition that is characterised by bilateral aplasia of the kidneys and wilms tumor
  • Wilms tumour and radial bilateral aplasia: A conditions that is characterized by the absence of one of the two forearm bones (radius) as well as the development of a type of kidney tumor called Wilm's tumor.
  • Wilms' tumor: A malignant kidney tumor that occurs in children.
  • Yager-Young syndrome: The false belief by a patient that they have low blood sugar because of the symptoms they are experiencing.
  • Yaws: A rare infections disease caused by the spiral-shaped bacteria Treponema pertenue. The disease consists of three phases: skin lesions are followed by bone, joint and widespread skin symptoms and finally by inflammation and destruction of cartilage in the nose, pharynx and palate. Transmission can be through direct contact with infected skin, insect bites or sex.

 

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